Jump to content

Iron Man Three a.k.a. Iron Man 3


Peter T Chattaway
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • 3 months later...
  • Replies 169
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

China will gets its very own version of the movie.

The Chinese version of the film will also feature a special appearance of China’s top actress, Fan Bingbing, and will offer specially prepared bonus footage made exclusively for the Chinese audience. Marvel Studios’ experience working on this film with Fan Bingbing and Wang Xueqi and in shooting in China has been very positive and has created a springboard for future collaboration with China’s talented stars and its growing film and television industry.

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
Twitter Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

China will gets its very own version of the movie.

The Chinese version of the film will also feature a special appearance of China’s top actress, Fan Bingbing, and will offer specially prepared bonus footage made exclusively for the Chinese audience. Marvel Studios’ experience working on this film with Fan Bingbing and Wang Xueqi and in shooting in China has been very positive and has created a springboard for future collaboration with China’s talented stars and its growing film and television industry.

If that's really true (not just publicity spin), it's great news! On multiple levels.

Also, China's top actress is a "Fan." laugh.png

"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

"If apologetics could prove God, I would lose all faith in Him." -- Josie

"What if--just what if--the very act of storytelling is itself redemptive? What if gathering up the scraps and fragments of a disordered life and binding them between the pages of a book in all of their fragmentary disorder is itself a gambit against that disorder?" -- NBooth

Link to comment
Share on other sites

China will gets its very own version of the movie.

The Chinese version of the film will also feature a special appearance of China’s top actress, Fan Bingbing, and will offer specially prepared bonus footage made exclusively for the Chinese audience. Marvel Studios’ experience working on this film with Fan Bingbing and Wang Xueqi and in shooting in China has been very positive and has created a springboard for future collaboration with China’s talented stars and its growing film and television industry.

If that's really true (not just publicity spin), it's great news! On multiple levels.

You think so? It gives me frightening visions of a world where every big-budget movie has a different version for every market and unutterable confusion reigns. Also it raises the horrible, horrible prospect of foreign films having new scenes and actors added for Americans.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rushmore wrote:

: You think so? It gives me frightening visions of a world where every big-budget movie has a different version for every market and unutterable confusion reigns. Also it raises the horrible, horrible prospect of foreign films having new scenes and actors added for Americans.

Well, that world has been with us for a while now. See, e.g., the American re-cut of the original Gojira aka Godzilla, which added new footage of Raymond Burr; or see the rather different European and American versions of the 1999 mini-series Jesus starring Jeremy Sisto. Or the various cuts of Blade Runner, Legend and the first few Superman films (including Supergirl), which were released with different shots (and with an entirely different soundtrack, in Legend's case) based on which continent they were playing on. And then there are the IMAX versions of the Transformers films, which had extra scenes that were not in the regular theatrical versions of those films, right?

I guess one thing that *might* be new here is that an American film is having footage added for a *foreign* audience, rather than vice versa; plus, this is being done during the film's initial release, and not when the film is released in another country a year or two after it played in its own country. And maybe the fact that they're casting a popular foreign actress to appear *only* in scenes that are released in her native country is unprecedented, too.

But the notion of multiple versions of big-budget films, depending on geography etc., is not all *that* unusual, when you get right down to it.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw gives it 4 stars:

Iron Man 3 is smart, funny and spectacular – I particularly liked Stark's brutally unsentimental reaction to the news that a kid who is helping him is missing his errant dad. Stark now probably succeeds Chaplin as Downey's key creation as an actor, loosing off funny lines with virtuoso skill, throwing away gags and delaying punchlines: Alec Baldwin does something similar, but in a more reflective style. This may not be to everyone's taste and some odd repeated jokes about Christmas indicate that a different release date may have been planned. But it is quality Friday night entertainment: the innocent pleasure of the week.

"I feel a nostalgia for an age yet to come..."
Opus, Twitter, Facebook

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A couple comic artists have tweeted that they thought this was the strongest of the Iron Man flicks.

That wouldn't be a high bar to clear.

[ducks!]

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thom Wade wrote:

: A couple comic artists have tweeted that they thought this was the strongest of the Iron Man flicks.

Are we counting The Avengers in that?

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another Clip.

I think this is a pretty neat scene and I'm looking forward to seeing how it all plays out. So I guess that means that this is a great piece of marketing.

Edited by Attica
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Questions to ask yourself while watching Iron Man 3:

1. Where are the other Avengers?

You know, at the risk of losing an hour to writing this post, I'm just going to stop there.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Justin Hanvey wrote:

: I'm always wondering...where's the Xmen? Where's Spiderman? Even during the Avengers movie...

The X-Men are with 20th Century Fox, and Spider-Man is with Sony, while the Avengers are with Disney. So, no overlap as far as the movies are concerned.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Questions to ask yourself while watching Iron Man 3:

1. Where are the other Avengers?

You know, at the risk of losing an hour to writing this post, I'm just going to stop there.

Well.... they're out Winter Soldiering or Dark Worlding or whatever else Avengers have to do on their own...

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Questions to ask yourself while watching Iron Man 3:

1. Where are the other Avengers?

You know, at the risk of losing an hour to writing this post, I'm just going to stop there.

Maybe they were busy making another movie.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So yeah. Downey is Downey, and there are some nifty action sequences, and Ben Kingsley can act. In my book, that's not enough.

My three main problems:

First, the Mandarin. I find the twist relating to his character highly off-putting, and not as a comic-book fan (I'm not sure I ever read a single comic book featuring the Mandarin). There's a political as well as cultural dimension that I find problematic, especially in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing.

As played by Kingsley, there’s nothing ostensibly even remotely Chinese about this “Mandarin,” beyond his trappings (Asian attendants and what we see of a Hollywood opium-den compound). Then comes a revisionistic twist that will make fans of the comics character wonder why they used the name “Mandarin” at all…

But the problem goes deeper. The original Iron Man was willing to deal pretty honestly, within its comic-book milieu, with the reality of foreign terrorism. The terrorists in its Afghanistan caves were an international lot with no explicit religious or political agenda, but their methods and behavior looked realistic enough, and there was a certain thoughtfulness to the political subtext of Iron Man touching down in the Middle East to clean up a problem that he had inadvertently created with his own weapons.

Compared to that, what happens in Iron Man 3 is a travesty — one in which the U.S. government is implicated at (almost) the highest level. As it happens, this cop-out plays particularly poorly after the Boston Marathon bombings and the inevitable, inflammatory “truther” allegations of an inside job with government involvement…

Second, the "Extremis" serum and how it's portrayed (again, I never read the comics series). This whole plot feels like it belongs in a different movie from the first two Iron Man films. It doesn't really work for me.

To begin with, there are extraordinary regenerative powers that would put the X-Men’s Wolverine to shame. They also have hopped-up aggressive tendencies, which means they’re all supervillains. This is a problem, since you basically can’t stop them unless you kill them (which isn’t easy).

All the violent killing, of people who may not be entirely morally responsible for their actions, puts a damper on the escapist fun quotient — and that’s apart from Extremis-powered villains going haywire and literally exploding with such force that bystanders are vaporized.

For some reason, the super-baddies’ regenerative powers generate enormous amounts of heat — but they can also generate heat at will, melting steel with their bare hands and so forth (a little Human Torch thrown in). One of them even breathes fire, an unnecessary flourish that isn’t much helped by having Tony’s armored ally Jim Rhodes (Don Cheadle) comment disbelievingly on it (“You breathe fire?!”).

Oh, and they do electricity, too. Well, why not. With a single zappy touch, one of them shorts out the armor Rhodey wears as War Machine (or “Iron Patriot,” as the government has rebranded him). In The Avengers, Thor hit Iron Man with a lightning bolt, and it charged up the suit to “400% capacity.” Now an electrical zap shuts down the armor? How does that work?

Finally, Pepper, once again underutilized and, in the end, badly misused.

“I get to wake up every morning with someone who still has her soul,” Tony says in one of the film’s more resonant lines. Unfortunately, there’s more tell than show. Pepper was underutilized in Iron Man 2, but what happens here isn’t an improvement.

The movie separates Tony and Pepper for most of the story, and when she finally reappears, it’s in a capacity that, suffice to say, doesn’t play to her strengths as a character. Pepper has always been what grounded Tony, what connected him to reality. Iron Man 3 ultimately disconnects Pepper from reality, which is just not right.

In The Avengers, Pepper had one real scene and a couple of other moments, but, in those brief appearances, Joss Whedon nailed what’s special about her character and her relationship with Tony. That’s missing here. Whether or not Tony deserves better, Pepper certainly does.

My review.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Link to comment
Share on other sites

SDG wrote:

: Compared to that, what happens in Iron Man 3 is a travesty — one in which the U.S. government is implicated at (almost) the highest level. As it happens, this cop-out plays particularly poorly after the Boston Marathon bombings and the inevitable, inflammatory “truther” allegations of an inside job with government involvement…

Hmmm, between that and Star Trek into Darkness, we might have a theme here...

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

: Compared to that, what happens in Iron Man 3 is a travesty — one in which the U.S. government is implicated at (almost) the highest level. As it happens, this cop-out plays particularly poorly after the Boston Marathon bombings and the inevitable, inflammatory “truther” allegations of an inside job with government involvement…

Hmmm, between that and Star Trek into Darkness, we might have a theme here...

Oh, dear. Have you seen it already, or are you reading tea leaves?

In the Iron Man films, we are now 3 for 3 with the following trope (spoiler warning). Two villains: a) a visible, exotically non-American villain (who in this case is not quite as exotic as he seems), and b.) an invisible American villain, an entrepreneur who is the real power behind the visible, non-American villain, whom he is in some way using or exploiting. (In Iron Man 2, though, this relationship was much more interesting and ambiguous than in either of the other two. Mickey Rourke and Sam Rockwell were each using the other in their own ways. Villain-wise, Iron Man 2 was easily the best of the trilogy.)

I am tired of this, and the way it plays in this particular case against the background of the Boston Marathon bombing makes it particularly distasteful.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Link to comment
Share on other sites

SDG wrote:

: Compared to that, what happens in Iron Man 3 is a travesty — one in which the U.S. government is implicated at (almost) the highest level. As it happens, this cop-out plays particularly poorly after the Boston Marathon bombings and the inevitable, inflammatory “truther” allegations of an inside job with government involvement…

Hmmm, between that and Star Trek into Darkness, we might have a theme here...

From SDG's review (not excerpted here):

In the very end comes a moment that’s meant to be redemptive, to suggest that Tony has somehow conquered a problem he had. It doesn’t work.
Among Side Effects, Oblivion, and to a much lesser extent Mud, cathartic moments that don't work seems to be a theme.

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

Link to comment
Share on other sites

By the way, it turns out my Star Trek screening yesterday wasn't canceled. The publicists just lied to us, while telling a few elite critics that what they really meant to do was preserve it for only critics who would be doing fancy features and interviews with the cast. One of those critics told me, "They said, 'Yeah, if anybody asks you why the screening was canceled, just lie.'"

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...