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Peter T Chattaway
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Hailee Steinfeld in Talks to Star in Indie 'Romeo & Juliet' (Exclusive)

Hailee Steinfeld, Oscar-nominated for the Coen Bros’ True Grit, is in negotiations to star as Juliet in a new Romeo and Juliet movie.

Carlo Carlie, an Italian director perhaps best known for the 1992 festival foreign film Flight of the Innocent, is behind the camera for the adaptation of the William Shakespeare classic, which has a some big names behind it.

Julian Fellowes, whose screenwriting credits range from Gosford Park to The Tourist, wrote the script and is producing along with Garbiele Muccino, the director of the Will Smith drama Seven Pounds, as well as former New Line execs-turned-producers Ileen Maisel and Mark Ordesky. . . .

Hollywood Reporter, April 7

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Julian Fellowes, whose screenwriting credits range from Gosford Park to The Tourist, wrote the script ...

... wrote the script??? ... oh, I guess this is an "indie" version, does that mean we can't actually use Shakespeare's dialogue?

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Persiflage wrote:

: ... wrote the script??? ... oh, I guess this is an "indie" version, does that mean we can't actually use Shakespeare's dialogue?

Well, not necessarily. The "indie" Ethan Hawke version of Hamlet used Shakespeare's dialogue, but obviously, because of the modern setting, there had to be a lot of new stage directions etc. And while I've never read the screenplay for Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet -- which famously included every single word of the bard's dialogue, even though it meant a running time of about four hours -- I am told that it deserved its Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay, again because it had to provide stage directions and camera directions and the like.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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The "indie" Ethan Hawke version of Hamlet used Shakespeare's dialogue, but obviously, because of the modern setting, there had to be a lot of new stage directions etc. And while I've never read the screenplay for Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet -- which famously included every single word of the bard's dialogue, even though it meant a running time of about four hours -- I am told that it deserved its Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay, again because it had to provide stage directions and camera directions and the like.

Yeah. I would imagine that writing a Shakespeare script is actually a pretty challenging endeavor.

Alright, I wasn't thinking of that, so you guys are right. I guess the main question then is whether Carlie and Fellowes are going to use Shakespeare's language or not.

When someone uses the phrase "adaptation of" a Shakespeare play, I've generally taken that to mean they are not using Shakespeare's dialogue (i.e., Kiss Me Kate (1948), The Tempest (1982) or Scotland, P.A. (2001)). But hopefully I'm wrong, because I'd bet that Steinfeld could handle Shakespearean dialogue just fine. Just don't cast Robert Pattinson as the lead.

Edited by Persiflage
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  • 1 month later...

As Romeo's cousin Benvolio ... Kodi Smit-McPhee?

And ... will there be nudity?

(Olivia Hussey was 16 when the Zeffirelli film came out. Steinfeld turns 15 in December. For whatever that's worth.)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Douglas Booth, thou art 'Romeo'

British thesp Douglas Booth has been cast as Romeo opposite Hailee Steinfeld in Carlo Carlei's "Romeo and Juliet."

19-year-old Booth beat out more than 300 other young thesps for the coveted role of Romeo, an accomplished swordsman and adept lover who falls for Juliet despite the bitter rivalry between their families.

Holly Hunter co-stars as Juliet's Nurse, while Ed Westwick and Kodi Smit-McPhee are set to play the two lovers' cousins, Tybalt and Benvolio, respectively. . . .

Booth previously appeared in the Starz miniseries "Pillars of the Earth" and will soon be seen as Miley Cyrus' love interest in "LOL." Thesp clearly has a taste for the classics, as he's also set to star alongside Ray Winstone in the BBC's upcoming adaptation of "Great Expectations." . . .

Variety, June 21

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Yet another retelling of Pyramus and Thisbe...

Creativity is dead. :D

Who should be cast as "The Wall?" That wicked wall, through whom no one sees any bliss!

Cursed be thy stones for thus deceiving us!

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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Yet another retelling of Pyramus and Thisbe...

Creativity is dead. :D

Who should be cast as "The Wall?" That wicked wall, through whom no one sees any bliss!

Cursed be thy stones for thus deceiving us!

I hope the new movie doesn't pad out the story with extraneous characters and absurd plot complications like that Shakespeare guy did. And after adding all that junk, he leaves out the Mulberry Tree? Really. Some people have no respect for the classics and think they have to be tarted up for contemporary tastes to be any good.

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Some people have no respect for the classics and think they have to be tarted up for contemporary tastes to be any good.

[/carlin]

Respect the classics, maaan!

[/carlin]

Who says Cars isn't quotable?

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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SDG wrote:

: Who says Cars isn't quotable?

I didn't say it isn't quotable, just that I've never heard anyone quote it. Obviously, any movie with dialogue is ABLE to be quoted. :)

Edited to add: Okay, I did say A Bug's Life was "more quotable" than Cars, which was a succinct way of noting that one film tends to be quoted (though perhaps not that often) while the other film tends NOT to be quoted. But that was intended as a descriptive, rather than prescriptive, observation. And of course calling A Bug's Life "more quotable" does leave open the possibility that Cars is "less quotable", rather than "not quotable". :)

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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But I gave you two!! :)

Oh, make that three! :)

Oh, make that... oh never mind.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Holly Hunter co-stars as Juliet's Nurse, while Ed Westwick and Kodi Smit-McPhee are set to play the two lovers' cousins, Tybalt and Benvolio, respectively. . . .

Booth previously appeared in the Starz miniseries "Pillars of the Earth" and will soon be seen as Miley Cyrus' love interest in "LOL." Thesp clearly has a taste for the classics, as he's also set to star alongside Ray Winstone in the BBC's upcoming adaptation of "Great Expectations." . . .

Variety, June 21

No casting for Mercutio yet? Maybe it's because I was given the part in high school, but he's always been my favorite character in the play. John McEnery was a depressing Mercutio in Zeffirelli's version (no real sense of fun). Harold Perrineau's gay version was a little more spirited, but somehow his part seemed smaller in Baz Luhrmann's version. Honestly, I haven't seen an actor do the part who I really liked since John Barrymore's 1936 character.

Edited by Persiflage
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  • 3 months later...

Footage has been shown at Cannes, with one publicist promoting the film as "'Romeo and Juliet’ for the Twilight Generation".

post-46-0-29037200-1337521799_thumb.jpg

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 10 months later...

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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As much as I loved Steinfeld in True Grit, based on the clips in the trailer, it doesn't seem like she is quite able to pull of Juliet. The actor playing Romeo definitely has a Twilight-esque vibe. And was it just me, or were the accents all over the place (ranging from very British to mostly American, occasionally from the same character)?

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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The music was my next concern, especially since the styles were so widely diverse (dark oscillating strings and then pop piano music) which would really fight a unified atmosphere and tone for the movie. But widely diverse music styles with no coherence is something I complain about every time I see a David Fincher film, so I try to refrain from bringing that up too often. Horner is also a very hit or miss composer for me.

Edited by Evan C

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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But widely diverse music styles with no coherence is something I complain about every time I see a David Fincher film

Are you thinking of specific Fincher films here?

I only ask because your remark strikes me as odd. Many of his films have relatively coherent soundtracks (ALIEN 3, THE GAME, THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON).

Edited by Ryan H.
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But widely diverse music styles with no coherence is something I complain about every time I see a David Fincher film

Are you thinking of specific David Fincher films?

Primarily The Social Network, about which I snarkily remarked to a friend: "That film's score was composed by two people who took one class in computer music then randomly created a bunch of sounds that supposedly sounded interesting, but had no continuity or coherence with the action of the film." (Although how much I hate The Social Network's score has become a little bit of a joke among my friends.) I thought The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo had exactly the same problem, although you could possibly argue that it's appropriate for that film. And the sparse underscoring in Zodiac was so completely different each time it entered that I found it distracting from the film.

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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