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Guardians of the Galaxy


Peter T Chattaway
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It's striking how the European ad plays up the epic-ness whereas the American ad goes for the jokey-ness. (Which is not to say that the European ad doesn't have a few jokes, or that the American ad doesn't have some epic stuff. But the *tone* is so different...)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I was happy to see that the 17-minute preview went by pretty fast (after a slightly iffy start). Groot has the potential to be my favorite scene-stealer since, I dunno, Jon Lovitz in The Wedding Singer (though he's absolutely nothing like that character)...

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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For me the trailers certainly give the hope that this film will have some things "fresh" about it.  Of course I don't know if this is found within the 17 minute preview.

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  • 2 weeks later...

This was part of the 17-minute clip that played in IMAX theatres a week or two ago:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EzI-U1Fh9zc

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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Um, guys.

 

Just when I give up on comic book movies, this happens.

Don't look at me. You know my opinion is useless to you when it comes to comic-book movies (at least my positive opinion).

For what it's worth, though, there is a sense in which this movie is like the antidote to the whole vibe of nearly all summer tentpole blockbusters these days.

More to come.

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Um, guys.

 

Just when I give up on comic book movies, this happens.

Don't look at me. You know my opinion is useless to you when it comes to comic-book movies (at least my positive opinion).

For what it's worth, though, there is a sense in which this movie is like the antidote to the whole vibe of nearly all summer tentpole blockbusters these days.

More to come.

 

 

Question related to this, if you can answer at this moment: one of the reviews said that the film still

succumbs to the Marvel "big final act", throw in everything, action scene

. True?

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

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Um, guys.

 

Just when I give up on comic book movies, this happens.

Don't look at me. You know my opinion is useless to you when it comes to comic-book movies (at least my positive opinion).

For what it's worth, though, there is a sense in which this movie is like the antidote to the whole vibe of nearly all summer tentpole blockbusters these days.

More to come.

 

 

Question related to this, if you can answer at this moment: one of the reviews said that the film still

succumbs to the Marvel "big final act", throw in everything, action scene

. True?

 

Yes. True.

 

And there's an all-important MacGuffin that's fleetingly tied into the Marvel universe we know, and a team that nearly falls apart but comes together in a (hilarious) turning-point convo. Structurally, it's very much a Marvel Movie.

 

Tonally, visually, character-wise, it's … something different. 

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Dying to see the Howard the Duck cameo, myself.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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My review.
 

Surveying the prison commons, Rocket identifies three articles he will need to engineer an escape: a control device worn by the guards on their arms; a battery powering a device high on a tower in the middle of the commons — and a fellow prisoner’s prosthetic robot leg.

 

It’s a goofily random yet specific list, vaguely reminiscent of Westley in The Princess Bride, tallying the assets for storming the castle and sighing that it’s hopeless — though if only they had a wheelbarrow… And then, when the breakout comes, there’s an unexpected, hilarious punchline as Rocket’s reasons for including each of the items becomes clear.

 

If a satiric fairy-tale movie from the 1980s seems like an odd reference point at the top of a review of a 2014 Marvel movie, consider that one of Rocket’s companions is singularly obsessed with a vendetta to find the murderer of his kin. Another is enormous and powerful, not too bright, eager to please and has idiosyncratic speech patterns. When I figure out how to connect the green alien-warrior chick to Buttercup, I’ll get back to you.

 

Consider, too, that Guardians of the Galaxy explicitly name-checks such 1980s touchstones as Raiders of the Lost Ark and Footloose. And our protagonist, an ’80s child mash-up of Han Solo and Indiana Jones, jams on a Sony Walkman to tunes like "Come and Get Your Love" and the "Piña Colada" song. Wait, why are the songs from the ’60s and ’70s instead of the ’80s? Ah, there’s a reason.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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So if one has always thought The Princess Bride was overrated, as I have, does it follow that Guardians of the Galaxy is overrated too?

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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What Peter said.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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I spent the majority of GotG trying to figure out why I wasn't enjoying it more. Other than that the ending dragged a little and

that crashing flying vehicles into buildings is back to being a cool movie thing again

. I couldn't really answer. Each time I tried to look at any part, I gave grudging assent, noting some of the things I think Steven liked (though I'm surprised to be on the side of this duo that wishes a PG-13 movie were a little more kid friendly), but the whole was less than the sum of its admittedly good parts, for me, anyway.

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Peter and Christian: Did you read my review? The Princess Bride is one of three films I name-check, along with Galaxy Quest and Pirates of the Caribbean, that have a similar approach to genre and spoofery.

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Not the full review yet, no.

In other news: what were the post-credits tags to the first Captain America and Iron Man 3, again? I'm trying to figure out if Guardians of the Galaxy is the first Marvel film in which the post-credits tags *don't* point ahead to a future movie. (Unless, y'know, Marvel really does intend to base an entire movie on *that* character.)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Peter and Christian: Did you read my review? The Princess Bride is one of three films I name-check, along with Galaxy Quest and Pirates of the Caribbean, that have a similar approach to genre and spoofery.

Not when I'd posted, no, but I have now. 

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Rise of the Guardians of the Galaxy.

 

 

It may have seemed like the makings of a perfect opening night: perhaps popcorn, soda, great seats, the whispering of an excited crowd as the lights went down for a midnight first peek at "Guardians of the Galaxy."

 

The previews rolled, and then ... whaaaat?

 

"omg," one moviegoer tweeted. "they started playing rise of the guardians instead of guardians of the galaxy."

 

How in the galaxy did that happen?

 

"EVERYONE IN THE THEATRE IS CRYING," the tweeter added.

 

Then it happened again ... and again, possibly in more than one location...

It's the side effects that save us.
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Um, don't the studios have some control over which of their films are playing in which theatres and when? How could a movie that flopped a year and a half ago still *be* in these theatres' projection systems?

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Not the full review yet, no.

In other news: what were the post-credits tags to the first Captain America and Iron Man 3, again? I'm trying to figure out if Guardians of the Galaxy is the first Marvel film in which the post-credits tags *don't* point ahead to a future movie. (Unless, y'know, Marvel really does intend to base an entire movie on *that* character.)

 

The Avengers' post-credits tag didn't point to a future movie. It was just a bunch of heroes lounging around and enjoying a meal. Now, if you're talking about mid-credits tags... then The Avengers' pointed ahead to a future movie.

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Saw Guardians this afternoon with my son. We thought it was a lot of fun, a good adventure with interesting characters and an absorbing plot. Some highlights:

  1. Ship design was excellent, specifically on the Milano - loved the open cockpit, and the way the camera moved around the cockpit, seemed to be in a unique way
  2. Groot was a hoot, and Drax was a lot of fun
  3. Blue Amy Pond looked VERY cool, but was a kind of flat character
  4. Loved the sentiment and positivity
  5. Loved the Nova Corps
  6. Loved that the main planet seemed like a lovely place to live - most sci-fi locales these days are so grungy you sometimes wonder why they are worth saving. This place was gorgeous, but looked like a lived-in and livable place
  7. What Rocket wanted with the guy's leg

Some things that misfired:

  1. I hate to say it, but Bradley Cooper (who I *loved* in Alias) turned Rocket into almost a bland character. Rocket was well-written, and looked great. But the voice acting was so boring that I almost didn't care about Rocket, which seems like an impossible feat.
  2. Boy, this was the first Marvel movie that I winced at the dialogue, because of its raciness. Iron Man and Iron Man 2 had scenes I fast-forwarded or hid my son's eyes from. But this movie seemed to push the line a lot.
  3. Yeah, Blue Amy Pond was not very interesting

All in all, a solid film that I enjoyed very much.

In case you were wondering, my name is spelled "Denes House," but it's pronounced "Throatwobbler Mangrove."
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Well, mid-credits tags are, by definition, post-*some* credits. :)

Oh, and were the Avengers actually *enjoying* the shwarma? I thought the whole joke of the scene was that they *weren't*. :)

Christian: Agreed about Bradley Cooper's miscasting, especially in light of the perfect casting of Vin Diesel.

Though did the main planet really looked "lived in"? I kept thinking it looked a little *too* perfect, like some of the characters' hair.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I think the shawarma scene is ambiguous. You can't tell if they're enjoying it or not.

Fwiw, I have gotten shawarma in NYC more than once since AVENGERS. It's awesome.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY is the best of the new Star Wars sequels. I'm guessing that the identity of Quill's father ends up being

Han Solo.

 

I had a lot of fun with this one, and it's one of the better Marvel films in recent memory (though I greatly enjoyed the recent X-Men, for entirely different reasons than this film). I was particularly impressed with the details and world-building. Both the CGI and the makeup/effects were impressive, and different designs were intriguing and complex. I'm not sure if these are a reflection of the comics or the filmmakers; either way, they were splendid.

Edited by Joel Mayward
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