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So we've no thread for Homeland yet? Season One comes out on DVD tomorrow, and, while I didn't watch it when it was on its first run last year, I have been catching re-runs and am now about halfway through. This may be some of the best acting Claire Danes has been given an opportunity to do. Damian Lewis (Captain Winters from Band of Brothers), Morena Baccarin (Inara from Firefly), and Mandy Patinkin (Rube from Dead Like Me) are all pretty stellar as well. I like how the show actually does some thinking. It doesn't just simplify politics and religion, Christianity and Islam - but it makes what I'd call a good faith effort to look with some depth and intelligence at both sides.

Not a great show yet, but significantly better than most of what's on television right now. Season Two begins on September 30th. Here's the trailer -

Anyone else see Season One?

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Damian Lewis (Captain Winters from Band of Brothers),

And Life!

I also enjoyed what I caught of this show, though I was not able to keep up with it at the time. The performances drew me in, but I stayed for the intriguing plot developments as they handled an overall sense of disorientation very well.

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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I saw all but the last installment, which I'missed but later recorded on DVR (I don't know why I'm saving it, espicially now that it is renewed). I concur with all that has been said. I am impressed with their sympathetic portrayal of Islam. Impressed that it is not simplistic and PC "sympathy". Islam as a plausible, if subtley duplicitous way of life as depicted here. Islam has a big presence here in Detroit. I have many Moslem acquaintances and some friends. I'm saying they do Islam "right" without a sales pitch, or totally in the tank for or against.

Edited by Rich Kennedy

"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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We're most of the way through the first season. Aside from a few false notes, I think this is great television. I'll probably comment more on story or theme when I actually finish the season, but I'll mention a few things I like. First, Virgil and Max ("He thinks the wife is hot."). I've been a fan of David Marciano since Due South, and it's great to see him here. Second, I love the jazz theme that's woven throughout. Saul makes a quote about halfway through the show about how he prefers Coltrane to Monk. "Less fuss," or something like that. I think, as layered and complex as the show is, it's not fussy at all. Third, the show is incredibly cinematic. There are some long shots and pans that are just beautiful, especially in high def. There's a lot of care taken with the cinematography. Lastly, I really enjoy how the show handles time. Todd VanDerWerff from the AV Club pointed this out — unlike a lot of other shows, which tend to move in real time with the audience (each episode represents a week), Homeland (and Mad Men) do what they want with time. It might be a day between episodes, or it might be four months.

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Love this show. (Spoilers for the final episodes below)

I thought the conversation between Brody and Carrie at the cabin when they finally confronted each other about Carrie's surveillance and Brody's shadiness was particularly well handled. In a lesser show, there might be screaming and fistfighting and strawmen and ad hominem. Instead, after a protracted tension while they post-coitally flirt in which the viewer is thinking about when Carrie is going to need her gun, they both just kind of looked at each other calmly across a picnic table and laid out their cards...or some of them.

Damian Lewis (Captain Winters from Band of Brothers),

And Life!

I still mourn Life all the time.

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So, was it worthy of the Emmys? Have to say it seems like kind of a weak year for American TV - most of the great shows of the last decade have stopped, others are pretty much running on empty...

As to Homeland, for some reason I'm more interested in seeing Hatufim (Prisoners of War), the original Israeli version. Has anyone seen this, and if so is it worth watching?

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The fact that the narrative hook for the show (US official keeping the drone bombing of a school under wraps) closely resembles what is actually happening with current drone strikes makes this show more emotionally engaging than it otherwise would be.

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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Anyone else keeping up with the second season? I wasn't a huge fan of the first four episodes, but last night's kind of blew me away. There's a sequence that was up there with the priest scene from Hunger in terms of two-character interaction.

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
Twitter Blog

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The second season is almost over (1 episode left). It's been one of the most uneven seasons of a show I can remember, mainly in terms of how compelling it is; it went off the deep end of plausibility a while ago, and hasn't looked back. But when the show is on, it can still be quite good.

The "Hollywood Prospectus" podcast at Grantland recaps the show every week, and one of the most intriguing points they've made is that the Dana plot line is basically the plot of Margaret, only not good at all.

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
Twitter Blog

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The second season is almost over (1 episode left).

And 1:1 is still marked a very long wait at Netflix and keeps getting skipped over each time I return something.flame.gif

Edited by Darrel Manson
A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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Saul really wanted Carrie to go with him to Nazir's burial instead of to Walden's memorial, like he knew going there would be a bad idea. Also, Quinn sure disappeared for the last half of the episode. Also also, where was F. Murray Abraham?

It was strange (and fun) to see John Cariani, the guy who plays autistic reporter Michael Falk for The Onion, as a regular person here.

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
Twitter Blog

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Henry Bromell, who wrote "Q&A," the best episode Homeland has done, has died.

Over the course of his career, Bromell worked on "Homicide," "Homeland," "I'll Fly Away," "Chicago Hope," "Carnivale," "Brotherhood" and "Rubicon," among others. Sometimes, as on "Homeland," he was part of the staff; other times, like "Rubicon" (where he was brought in after the pilot to replace the creator), he was the man in charge.

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
Twitter Blog

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  • 11 months later...

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