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Around the World in 80 Days


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The previews looked frighteningly bad, so personally, I'll need a lot of persuasion to see this one. A Jules Verne novel turned into a Jackie Chan martial arts showcase would seem even more painfully revisionist than Disney's 'Hunchback.'

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I couldn't think of a Jackie Chan movie I'd seen worth a thirty-minute drive.

There are a couple, such as Drunken Master 2 (bastardized as Legend Of The Drunken Master) or some of the Police Story series, but they all came out 10-20 years ago.

Edited by opus

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Ah yes, Drunken Master 2 is so good, even in its bastardized form.

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What kills me is that this "revisionist" film has been made by the same studio that made the reportedly faithful adaptation of Holes and is now at work on Narnia ...

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I'm guessing that, given the importance of the whole 80 days thing, there may be specific dates given either in the original or the sequel. Is it so?

Ron "One Track" Reed

I've posted a couple hundred of my Soul Food Movies write-ups at letterboxd

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Is this the one with Steve Coogan? He's pretty well known over here for his comedy stuff, notably his Alan Partidge character who started out as a TV Chat Show host, but has got demoted in every series. Coogan stuff cleary went on to influence the office. The awful embarrasment you feel watching "The Office" is really just a progression from "Alan Partridge", and Brent is very similar to Partridge, a self important social inadequate deluded, but still somehow human and very vaguely lovable.

So Coogan could be good, which will be the reason it gets watched over here (well Jackie Chan will pull a few in I suppose). That said he's not written it (or adapted it rather), and "The Parole Officer" was only lukewarm.

If you like The Office you should go and see it, just on the off chance it comes close to Coogan's highs.

Matt

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The good news is that it isn't awful, as long as you go in expecting a relatively tame but colorful family friendly time at the movies.

::Confessing ignorance, never having read the book:: Seeing that Mexican actor Cantinflas played Fogg's French valet Passepartout in Mike Todd's '59 version and Jackie Chan plays the part in 2004, I can't help wondering: In the original story, is Passepartout a foreigner pretending to be French or is there in any way some mystery surrounding his origins?

---

Come to think of it, this might make for an interesting exercise. What were the best/worst jobs by an actor playing a nationality other than his/her own?

Edited by Michael Elliott

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Come to think of it, this might make for an interesting exercise.  What were the best/worst jobs by an actor playing a nationality other than his/her own?

I actually liked Keanu Reeves in Little Buddha, but it's a casting decision that lives in infamy.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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The worst: Hands down, Mickey Rooney in Breakfast at Tiffany's.

Also bad: Katherine Hepburn & John Wayne played orientals in a film together...

Really good: Vivien Leigh in Gone With The Wind,

Also: Renee Zellweger in Bridget Jones' Diary.

Nick

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Michael Elliott wrote:

: Come to think of it, this might make for an interesting exercise. What were the

: best/worst jobs by an actor playing a nationality other than his/her own?

Well, FWIW, the Golden Turkey Awards (published over 20 years ago) nominated Charles Mack and George Moran for their portrayal of Afro-Americans in Hypnotized (1933), Elvis Presley for his portrayal of a Native American in Stay Away, Joe (1968), and Robby Benson for his portrayal of a Chicano in Walk Proud (1979) before giving the award to Marlon Brando for his portrayal of an Okinawan in The Teahouse of August Moon (1956).

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Good: Bob Hoskins in Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

Robert Donat in The Inn of the Sixth Happiness

Kenneth Branagh in Dead Again

Bad: Lou Diamond Phillips in Young Guns

Raymond Massey in The Scarlet Pimpernel (great villain, but no serious attempt at being French)

Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

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: GOOD: Ben Kingsley in... uh... several things.

Yeah although despite the brilliance of his Gandhi performance there's also something about the nature of it that jars with me. I dunno it just feels a bit, um , colonial?

Bad - the numerous actors who've played Jesus (Iraxoqui and Cavaziel excepted). but Ted Neely - did he look even remotely like a Jewish labourer?

Tom Cruise in Far and Away ("Oi'm Oirish"). And Sean Connery in any role where he's not playig someone from Edinburgh.

Good - Gwyneth Paltrow's English accent is so good (and frequently resorted to) that I forget she's American (I saw her do something in an AMerican accent the other day and it just seemd weird!)

Matt

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  • 1 month later...

Saw this today, partly out of some perverse desire to catch up on recent films, and partly cuz I like Steve Coogan (whose only other film that I've seen, I think, was 24 Hour Party People), but also partly out of some sort of completist compulsion to keep track of what Walden has been up to before their Narnia movie comes out next year.

SDG wrote:

: The most aggressively stupid film I have seen in a very long time.

Hmmm, define "aggressively". I can think of stupider films in recent memory, but they might have been more, I dunno, lazily stupid than aggressively so.

I thought this was par for the course as recent Jackie Chan flicks go ... but most Jackie Chan flicks don't have budgets of $100 million or more. (And by "recent" I mean films that were MADE recently, not films that were RELEASED recently after being hacked down from much older films such as Drunken Master 2, which I saw on video long before the bastardized Legend of the Drunken Master came out.)

Refresh my memory -- Jackie Chan is NOT in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, correct?

And neither is Richard Branson, right?

Okay, whew, good, thought not.

This movie could also be a contender for Most Unexpected Credit: "Special thanks to Wim Wenders." Eh? What did HE do to get his name listed in this film?

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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This movie could also be a contender for Most Unexpected Credit:  "Special thanks to Wim Wenders."  Eh?  What did HE do to get his name listed in this film?

Convince the governor of California to dress up like a girly man?

Edited by Clint M
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Good explanation, SDG -- and in fact, your Anchorman reference reminds me, Around the World in 80 Days really did sink to that level in some strange ways, like in those scenes that deal with Mark Addy's missing nipples. What was THAT all about?

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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