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Variety:

After taking a year to find his next project, David Fincher may be ready to helm another adaptation of a popular book.

Fincher is in talks to helm Fox's "Gone Girl," adapted from the Gillian Flynn novel that has sold 2 million copies. No offer is on the table yet.

Reese Witherspoon and Bruna Papandrea will produce through their Pacific Standard banner along with Leslie Dixon.

Flynn's third novel, "Gone Girl" is the dark and suspenseful story of a woman who disappears on the day of her fifth wedding anniversary. It's not known if Witherspoon would be interested in starring as the mysterious wife.

I read Gone Girl a few months ago. I didn't love it as much as some people seem to, but it's a well-done novel.

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
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I trust that Harris is a more versatile actor than his roles so far have shown us. I've been waiting for him to branch out, play "more notes." I'm excited about having him in a Fincher film. 

 

As for the age difference, I think Pike can play older than she is; she has a magisterial quality about her that could easily convince me she's an older woman to Affleck's air of naiveté.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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I trust that Harris is a more versatile actor than his roles so far have shown us. I've been waiting for him to branch out, play "more notes." I'm excited about having him in a Fincher film.    As for the age difference, I think Pike can play older than she is; she has a magisterial quality about her that could easily convince me she's an older woman to Affleck's air of naiveté.

Yeah...considering Harris has spent the majority of his time the past few years on a popular sit-com (which led -not to shockingly- to people calling him for comedy roles in between)...I trust Fincher knows what he is doing...

Edited by Thom Wade

"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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Justin Chang's review.
 

A lady vanishes and is soon presumed dead, but it’s her marriage that winds up on the autopsy table in “Gone Girl,” David Fincher’s intricate and richly satisfying adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s 2012 mystery novel. Surgically precise, grimly funny and entirely mesmerizing over the course of its swift 149-minute running time, this taut yet expansive psychological thriller represents an exceptional pairing of filmmaker and material, fully expressing Fincher’s cynicism about the information age and his abiding fascination with the terror and violence lurking beneath the surfaces of contemporary American life. Graced with a mordant wit as dry and chilled as a good Chablis, as well as outstanding performances from Ben Affleck and a revelatory Rosamund Pike, Fox’s Oct. 3 wide release should push past its preordained Oscar-contender status to galvanize the mainstream.

 

 

"A revelatory Rosamund Pike." 

 

Shoot, Justin Chang, that's all you had to say.

 

pulp.jpg

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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The AV Club:

 

As with almost all of Fincher’s movies, Gone Girl has too much going on in it to absorb in one viewing, and I’d like to see it again before indulging in further hyperbole. (At least one plot element, apparently already controversial from the novel, sticks in my craw; the movie’s take on various forms of assault doesn’t exactly qualify as enlightened.) But this is a far richer film than Fincher’s The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo—and one that, I suspect, will be remembered with his best.
 

 

 

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Anthony Lane:
 

At first blush, “Gone Girl” is natural Fincherland. Not geographically; he seems less absorbed in North Carthage, described by Amy as “the navel of the country,” than he was in the California of “Zodiac” or the Harvard of “The Social Network.” Those are his masterpieces: the two movies that I can’t not watch when they turn up on TV, and the two occasions on which his pedantry and his paranoia have fused together, engrossing us in a crazed aggregation of detail. Nothing could equip him better for the coiled and clustered goings on in the new film, and, for good measure, he has hired Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, whom he last used for “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” to compose the score. They don’t let him down. “Gone Girl” boasts one major act of savagery, drenched in a downpour of blood, and what we hear during it sounds like the wah-wah pedal of Satan. So why doesn’t the movie claw us as “The Social Network” did? Who could have predicted that a film about murder, betrayal, and deception would be less exciting than a film about a Web site?

 

The glum fact is that “Gone Girl” lacks clout where it needs it most, at its core. We are accustomed to Fincher’s heroes being as obsessively smart as he is, if lacking his overarching patience, whereas Nick remains, to put it gently, a lunkhead. Amy has twice the brain, and ten times the cunning, but, despite the best efforts of Rosamund Pike, her character, onscreen as on the page, feels cooked up rather than lived in.

 

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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David Fincher talks Gone Girl, avoids spoilers

 

 

It's very much ... subjective, sort of "he said, she said" in the book. But, you know, Gillian was very crafty. ... She understood one fundamental thing, which is the audience needs an access point. And she was very smart about being able to keep the "she said" to this extremely subjective point of view. And yet she was able to bring the "he said" into this omniscient foreground, where you're kind of measuring everything in terms of Ben's behavior, the way he reacts to information as it's divulged to him.

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Matt Zoller Seitz:

 

Suffice to say that with its explicit sex and violence and its one-damn-thing-after-another, to-hell-with-realism plotting, it's very much in the "Basic Instinct"/"Fatal Attraction"/"Presumed Innocent" wheelhouse. It is a metafictionally-minded version of a bloody domestic melodrama that actually uses the word "meta" (in a scene where Nick discusses his bar, which is named The Bar). It hitches most of its mystery plot to an anniversary scavenger hunt with clues enclosed in numbered envelopes clearly marked "clue." Many key scenes revolve around public statements that are in some sense performances, and that are evaluated by onlookers in terms of their believability.  

 

And yet it never crosses the line and becomes too much a deconstruction or parody. It's a plot-obsessed picture that's determined to stay one step ahead of the audience at all times, and cheats when it feels it has to. It is a perfect example of a sub-genre that the great critic Anne Billson has labeled "the preposterous thriller," in which "characters and their behavior bear no relation not just to life as we know it, but to any sort of properly structured fiction we may have hitherto encountered." 

Edited by NBooth
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I'm certainly drawn to the "preposterous thriller," so I'm hoping I can find something to appreciate here.

 

I actually thought of you when I got to this bit of the review:

 

 You know just how well working when you hear how audiences laugh at and with it. Their laughter evolves as the film evolves. They laugh tentatively at first, then with an enthusiasm that gives way to a full-throated, "I endorse this madness!" gusto during the final half-hour, when the story spirals into Brian DePalma-style expressionism and the picture becomes a maelstrom of blood, tears and other bodily fluids. 
 
--which certainly sounds promising, anyway.
 

That said, the last time we got comparisons to films like Basic Instinct and Fatal Attraction, it was in reference to the dull and sterile Side Effects.

 

Based on what I've read about this movie, I half-expect to wind up in the "better versions" thread saying that Dream Lover is a better version of Gone Girl

 

--that's a pretty major spoiler, btw. From what I can gather.

 

[Except who am I kidding? I'm a confirmed Fincher fan--or, at least, I've got a track record of liking more Fincher movies than I dislike--so I'm likely to appreciate this effort as well]

Edited by NBooth
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I tire easily of Fincher's acerbic nihilism and often find his relentless precision constricting rather than inspiring. This isn't to say that he hasn't made films I like (Fincher's The Game is one of the best films of the nineties).

I suspect my level of enthusiasm for Gone Girl will directly correlate to how funny I find it to be.

Edited by Ryan H.
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Meh. I disagree with MZS that it stays ahead of audience and never descends into self parody. But not enough to argue the point. It was okay b/c it was Fincher, but I was disappointed b/c it was Fincher.

 

It's essentially an A-list treatment of a B-list story and script.

Edited by kenmorefield
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When did Fincher acquire his anointing as a "great director"? Honest question. Did the widespread critical reverence he now receives solidify after Se7en and Fight Club? Or did it come together around the release of Zodiac (not an audience favorite, but a smash with critics)?

 

The following is, admittedly, speculation. I first became aware of any sort of critical love around the time Zodiac came out--and since he followed that with two prestige-type movies (Benjamin Button, which is dire but which did manage to garner a fair amount of affection, and The Social Network), I'd say that the 2007-2010 years were a very good period for him, critically speaking. Certainly, it was Zodiac and The Social Network that won me over--and Se7en.

 

Did anyone love Fight Club when it came out? I mean, anyone who wasn't a college-age male? [i can appreciate it as a dark comedy, but it's far from my favorite Fincher]

Edited by NBooth
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Did anyone love Fight Club when it came out? I mean, anyone who wasn't a college-age male? [i can appreciate it as a dark comedy, but it's far from my favorite Fincher]

 

 

I fell for FIGHT CLUB soon after it was released on DVD (probably early 2000), but then I was also a college-age male at the time. I still think it's a pretty brilliant dark-comedy and critique of both capitalism AND counter-culture. As my supervisor put it, rebellion is already part of the system in a film like this.  I find its subversive elements work pretty well considering how many people (both detractors and fans) take it at face value, even though the film is completely ameniable to counter-readings.

 

Take this scene:

 

 

Anyone who can take Tyler Durden's statement at face value when both Pitt and Norton essentially look as cut as the guys in the Gucci ad, well I'm not sure what they're watching.

 

Still, I probably prefer SOCIAL NETWORK, ZODIAC, and maybe even DRAGON TATOO more right now. I like SE7EN and THE GAME at lot, but haven't revisited them in a while.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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I wouldn't suggest that Fight Club can be taken at face value. In fact, it's so subversive and contradictory that it moves into incoherence and then finally into the void, smugly standing against everything and for nothing.

The Game circles around the void, too, but it sustains its thematic tensions with greater clarity and more feeling.

Edited by Ryan H.
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