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RIP Harold Ramis


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He was 69.

 

 

Harold Ramis was one of Hollywood’s most successful comedy filmmakers when he moved his family from Los Angeles back to the Chicago area in 1996. His career was still thriving, with "Groundhog Day" acquiring almost instant classic status upon its 1993 release and 1984's "Ghostbusters" ranking among the highest-grossing comedies of all time, but the writer-director wanted to return to the city where he’d launched his career as a Second City performer.

 

“There's a pride in what I do that other people share because I'm local, which in L.A. is meaningless; no one's local,” Ramis said upon the launch of the first movie he directed after his move, the 1999 mobster-in-therapy comedy “Analyze This,” another hit. “It's a good thing. I feel like I represent the city in a certain way.”

 

Ramis, a longtime North Shore resident, was surrounded by family when he died at 12:53 a.m. from complications of autoimmune inflammatory vasculitis, a rare disease that involves swelling of the blood vessels, his wife Erica Mann Ramis said. He was 69.

 

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
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From the same article:

 

Ramis’ later directorial efforts, starting with “Groundhog Day” and including "Stuart Saves His Family" (1995), "Multiplicity" (1996), "Analyze This" and his "Bedazzled" remake (2000), reflect a spiritual striving, exploring individuals' struggles with themselves more than outside forces.

 

Comparing his later to earlier comedies, Ramis told the Tribune: "The content's different, but it comes from the same place in me, which is to try to point people at some reality or truth."

 

He recalled that at the "Analyze This" junket, a writer told him his genre had become "goofy redemption comedy," to which Ramis responded, "OK, I'll take that."

 

Too bad our Best Comedies list isn't ready to release.

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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His "crazy legs" character from SCTV was brilliant.  I'll see if I can find a clip.

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Too bad our Best Comedies list isn't ready to release.

 

I don't mean to be disrespectful in what I'm about to say... quite the opposite, actually. Are we anywhere close to releasing the list? We could lead with "Harold Ramis Tops Arts and Faith Comedies List" - which would draw more attention to our list *and* to the lasting popularity of Ramis's most famous film.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Too bad our Best Comedies list isn't ready to release.

 

I don't mean to be disrespectful in what I'm about to say... quite the opposite, actually. Are we anywhere close to releasing the list? We could lead with "Harold Ramis Tops Arts and Faith Comedies List" - which would draw more attention to our list *and* to the lasting popularity of Ramis's most famous film.

 

Well...I'm writing the accompanying blog post. And it's not written yet. I don't know about the rest of the site, or the blurbs, etc.

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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I just found out on Mediaite. They linked a scene from Knocked Up. Rogan announces he's going to be a father. It just made me bawl. In the end, the man had soul that I never saw on screen. Maybe as a director. Other than the fact he's less than a decade older than me, why am I so broken up over this. Gonna miss the guy.

"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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One of Ramis's SCTV sketches is titled, "So You're Dead; Now What?"

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYCbF0Fat-c

 

Yeah...

 

Not sure how to feel about finding that.

I want to believe Ramis would appreciate thaat I was laughing at that. I think I am going to watch a few of his films (Stripes and Ghostbusters, for example) this weekend. Or this week, as I am currently jobless.

"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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I believe the only Ramis-directed film I have ever reviewed is Year One. I've been debating whether I should tweet a link to that. I get the impression it's the sort of film Ramis's fans would rather forget. Certainly the handful of obituaries I've seen have neglected to mention it at all (although at least one of them did mention The Ice Harvest!).

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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This was my favorite archived article about Harold Ramis

 

It makes the point that he is largely responsible for the Bill Murray personae that dominated the 80s. 

Nick Alexander

Keynote, Worship Leader, Comedian, Parodyist

Host of the Prayer Meeting Podcast - your virtual worship oasis. (Subscribe)

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Too bad our Best Comedies list isn't ready to release.

 

I don't mean to be disrespectful in what I'm about to say... quite the opposite, actually. Are we anywhere close to releasing the list? We could lead with "Harold Ramis Tops Arts and Faith Comedies List" - which would draw more attention to our list *and* to the lasting popularity of Ramis's most famous film.

 

 

Well...I'm writing the accompanying blog post. And it's not written yet. I don't know about the rest of the site, or the blurbs, etc.

 

 

FWIW, I finished up the blog post first thing this morning, and sent it to Greg and Jeremy. I haven't heard yet whether they've gotten it or not.

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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