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The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012)


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Please no! Raimi doesn't have the vision or the talent to direct these films.

I would tend to agree, but let's remember how many of us cried out, "What? The Fellowship of the Ring, from the director of Meet the Feebles?!"

I respect Raimi's Spider-man 2, and he did some good work in the first and third films as well. I wouldn't despair if he ended up helming The Hobbit. He would probably bring a lighter, more amusing tone to the story than Jackson or Del Toro, and that would be a good thing.

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Please no! Raimi doesn't have the vision or the talent to direct these films.

He probably COULD pull it off, but do we really want to see Bruce Campbell in a cameo as Bard? :)

If PJ is Executive Producing and presumably "signing off" on every creative decision, then he needs to go ahead and direct these movies. The Middle Earth that modern moviegoers know and love is his vision and his "baby,' and if PJ is as combative and uncompromising as he seems, there is bound to be creative conflict between him and whatever "big name director" they sign on to the project. All of that could be avoided if he would just direct the dang thing himself.

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Jeffrey said:

I would tend to agree, but let's remember there were many who cried out, "What? The Fellowship of the Ring, from the director of Meet the Feebles?!" I respect Raimi's Spider-man 2, and some of the first and third films as well.

I sort of agree with that comparison. But, Jackson had directed Heavenly Creatures before LOTR and that movie indicated he had the directing chops to handle a more serious story. And The Frighteners showed that he could handle a film full of FX. Granted, not on the level of LOTR, but it was still an indication of his abilities.

I also respect Spider-man 2. It's just that the first and third films are so generic and bland. I've never seen that much spectacle look and feel so unspectacular.

I'm just going to throw this out there:

BRAD BIRD

I could live with that. Well, let's be honest, I could do more than just live. :)

Edited by Phill Lytle

"The greatest meat of all. The meat of friendship and fatherhood."

The Blue Raft - Are you ready to ride?

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And where were all those girls when Kingdom of Heaven and Elizabethtown came out?

My wife was in those theaters. And she owns both on DVD.

"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

"If apologetics could prove God, I would lose all faith in Him." -- Josie

"What if--just what if--the very act of storytelling is itself redemptive? What if gathering up the scraps and fragments of a disordered life and binding them between the pages of a book in all of their fragmentary disorder is itself a gambit against that disorder?" -- NBooth

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Phil Lyttle wrote:

: Well, at the time of the first Pirates film . . .

Right, I remember all the buzz about Orlando then. But it was the sequels we were discussing here.

morgan1098 wrote:

: If PJ is Executive Producing and presumably "signing off" on every creative decision, then he needs to go ahead and direct these movies.

Not necessarily. See my earlier comment about George Lucas vs. Steven Spielberg. Or, for that matter, consider how Judd Apatow gets all the credit for certain comedies even when they are directed by other people (e.g. Superbad, Walk Hard), and consider how V for Vendetta is often treated as a Wachowski brothers movie even though it was officially directed by one of their proteges.

So it may be that the LAST thing you'd want for this film is a director with a stamp or a style of his own. What you need is someone who could channel Jackson's vision -- just as, with the original trilogy, what you needed was lesser-known actors who could serve the material, such as Ian McKellen, rather than big stars such as Sean Connery. ANY name that comes up in these early fanboy debates will almost certainly be the wrong person for the job, just on that basis (and perhaps for other reasons as well).

And FWIW, as with the James Bond movies, so here: I incline towards the view that the director should come from the British Commonwealth. (Though obviously the third Harry Potter movie didn't suffer for being directed by a non-Brit. The first two, though...)

: The Middle Earth that modern moviegoers know and love is his vision and his "baby,' and if PJ is as combative and uncompromising as he seems, there is bound to be creative conflict between him and whatever "big name director" they sign on to the project. All of that could be avoided if he would just direct the dang thing himself.

Or if they went for a "small name director" or even a "no name director", as per above.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I may be in the minority, but I like Raimi's films much more than anything Jackson has ever helmed. Would Raimi's style fit the Hobbit? No, not at all. Would Jackson? I think so. But I'd rather watch A Simple Plan over Two Towers any day of the week.

Don't know that I'd say quite that (I would've after my first viewing of Two Towers; but the second viewing was stronger), but I love A Simple Plan. However, Raimi qualifies for The Hobbit based more on his horror film style than his big-budget spectacles, which should be the more obvious comparison, but aren't, in my book.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Okay, I'll throw a new one in the mix. Instead of all these dark-and-serious guys, why not Jon Favreau? Everything he's done since Elf shows he's got both the technical skills and the kid-sense to pull of a light-hearted family film with a sense of danger.

Greg Wright

Managing Editor, Past the Popcorn

Consulting Editor, Hollywood Jesus

Leader of the Uruk-Howdy, Orcs of the West

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  • 2 weeks later...
I swear this conversation looks like it's being conducted in some smoky back room in a bordello. Come on, Beth? Where are you? Others? Am I the only one who thinks it's time to give a woman a shot at a big-budget fantasy?

No, you are not the only one. I think that Fran Walsh could do a very good job. I'm not sure she would even consider it though.

Jon Favreau is an interesting idea. I do know that he doesn't like CG though. He prefers physical makeup and effects. I wonder if he could get past his hangup for two CG heavy films.

"The greatest meat of all. The meat of friendship and fatherhood."

The Blue Raft - Are you ready to ride?

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No, you are not the only one.

Whew! Thanks for throwing me a bone on that one. Given that I was just about the only one around here who expressed confidence all along in saner business heads prevailing in the Jackson/New Line dispute, you'd think that my ideas about this topic would be more interesting to folks than they are proving to be... I mean, heck -- this IS my area of expertise!

Greg Wright

Managing Editor, Past the Popcorn

Consulting Editor, Hollywood Jesus

Leader of the Uruk-Howdy, Orcs of the West

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I could live with the Fran Walsh idea. So long as she and Philippa didn't decide to make the story some kind of "the power of the human spirit" kind of thing, like they did for LOTR.

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

SOURCES: Bob Shaye's New Line Contract Won't Be Renewed By Time Warner Boss

I can't pinpoint just when the formal announcement of Shaye's and Lynne's departures will come, but it's a safe bet that New Line will be folded into Warner Bros as a result, moving such premium projects as the long anticipated back-to-back feature films of that beloved book The Hobbit. Well, it's about time!

Nikki Finke, Deadline Hollywood Daily, January 21

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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History shows that people who publically say such things usually lose their jobs soon after.

TheOneRing.net has just published my guest editorial on the subject. Read it, if you care to.

I feel better and better about my prognostications all the time... [/smug]

Greg Wright

Managing Editor, Past the Popcorn

Consulting Editor, Hollywood Jesus

Leader of the Uruk-Howdy, Orcs of the West

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Don't get too smug. ;) This was posted yesterday: The OneRing.net.

Oops! I didn't see that my [/smug] tag was showing...

Well, it ain't over until it's over, as they say. Bob Shaye put out "For Your Consideration" ads for The Last Mimzy, too, so the "official" perception of reality at New Line is entirely in line with a fantasy like The Hobbit. New Line may be a good fit for the project yet.

Greg Wright

Managing Editor, Past the Popcorn

Consulting Editor, Hollywood Jesus

Leader of the Uruk-Howdy, Orcs of the West

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Phill Lytle wrote:

: Don't get too smug. ;) This was posted yesterday: The OneRing.net.

What's all this talk of "IMDB"? The story was "broken" -- if indeed there IS a story to be broken -- by Nikki Finke at Deadline Hollywood Daily. And Studio Briefing (perhaps among other news summaries) gave credit to Finke for this story (and even said she "cit[ed] no sources"). And the IMDb (among other sites) posted what Studio Briefing wrote, including the credit for Finke. There's no need for a "correction" here (unless there was some OTHER page at the IMDB that failed to indicate where the rumour had started, or even that it WAS just a rumour at this point).

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Del Toro doubles up for 'Hobbit'

Guillermo del Toro is in talks to direct back-to-back installments of J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Hobbit," which is being co-financed by New Line and MGM. . . .

Principal photography for the films, which will be shot simultaneously, is tentatively set for 2009. The production budget is estimated at $150 million per film. The release of the first film is slated for 2010 and the second in 2011. . . .

Hollywood Reporter, January 27

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Has there really been such little fanfare around these parts for this news? I'm pretty pumped. Where's Jeffrey?

Some of the other names that got thrown around were ok, but I really wanted Peter Jackson to do these. But if he can't, I really can't think of anyone I'd rather have than del Toro. Not only is he someone who clearly has an affinity for fantasy, he also has the technical chops to do amazing work with Weta Workshops. I can actually see his visual style meshing better than almost anyone else with Jackson's style. And one thing I really wanted was for the art direction on this film to really mesh with the existing trilogy - for it to feel like it is the same world. When Jackson signed on to produce I knew we were part of the way there. As a fan, I'm feeling pretty happy about this today.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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Anders wrote:

: I really can't think of anyone I'd rather have than del Toro.

Really? I dunno, Del Toro's style is pretty dark, pretty grim -- all of his films have been R-rated except for Hellboy, which was PG-13 in theatres and "unrated" on DVD -- and The Hobbit is, essentially, a children's story. (Yes, yes, Peter Jackson has put his own stamp on the franchise now, but think about it: If the first film is basically The Hobbit and the second film is meant to bridge the gap between one story and the other, doesn't that also give the second film the opportunity to bridge the styles of the two stories? to offer some sort of segue?)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Anders wrote:

: I really can't think of anyone I'd rather have than del Toro.

Really? I dunno, Del Toro's style is pretty dark, pretty grim -- all of his films have been R-rated except for Hellboy, which was PG-13 in theatres and "unrated" on DVD -- and The Hobbit is, essentially, a children's story. (Yes, yes, Peter Jackson has put his own stamp on the franchise now, but think about it: If the first film is basically The Hobbit and the second film is meant to bridge the gap between one story and the other, doesn't that also give the second film the opportunity to bridge the styles of the two stories? to offer some sort of segue?)

I guess I'm not thinking so much the "grimness" or how dark it is, but just the kind of visual style that del Toro has, and shares with Jackson, as far as detail, texture. del Toro's films feel "real" in the same way that Jackson's films (for good or worse, depending on your view) felt like a real world. Couldn't you see some of del Toro's creatures mixing it up with Jackson's orcs? I guess that's what I mean.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
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Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

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