Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I'm staying out of this ... :)

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 733
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

When the imagination of a writer and the passion of a theologian cross-fertilize the result is a novel on the order of The Shack. This book has the potential to do for our generation what John Bunyan

"Could we ever know each other in the slightest without the arts?"

« Nous connaîtrions-nous seulement un peu nous-mêmes, sans les arts? »

Quoted on Canada's $20 bill; from Gabrielle Roy's novel La montagne secrète. The English translation, The Hidden Mountain, is by Harry L. Binsse.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

I'm a little late to the game, but I've been doing my best to catch up as quickly as possible on George R.R. Martin's "A Song Of Fire And Ice" series. I just started A Feast For Crows, and so far, it's just what I've come to expect from Martin: captivating, dynamic characters, intense action, and a plot that continually throws in surprising developments and never seems to suffer or stagnate due to its scope.

"I feel a nostalgia for an age yet to come..."
Opus, Twitter, Facebook

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just started Theodore Roszak's Flicker, thanks to Dennis Cozzalio; Good Calories, Bad Calories, by Gary Taubes, which is an informational feast; and Hanna Rosin's God's Harvard, about Patrick Henry College.

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to post
Share on other sites
...and Hanna Rosin's God's Harvard, about Patrick Henry College.

I just heard a review of this on my NPR Book podcast; it sounds quite interesting. Let me know how it is!

Having finished UnChristian by the Barna Group, I'm starting Endo's Silence, moving on to Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon and then on to a bunch of other books I said I was reading a while ago.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jason: I

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the thoughts, Christian. Rosin related the story about her babysitter on NPR, which was pretty interesting. The interviewer also had a Patrick Henry student on the air, and he did a fair job of presenting the school in a positive light.

The student studied film at PH, and Rosin was asked if she saw any difference between a Christian making a film to "change Hollywood" and Robert Redford making a 'liberal' film to "wake people up." She said something along the lines of, "No." And it was in a positive sense.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jason Panella wrote:

: The student studied film at PH, and Rosin was asked if she saw any difference between a Christian making a film to "change Hollywood" and Robert Redford making a 'liberal' film to "wake people up." She said something along the lines of, "No." And it was in a positive sense.

Ugh, just what we need. A Godsploitation version of Lions for Lambs.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've recently finished Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke and loved it. A rich sense of English history with occasional trips into magic and fantasy. A novel that is literary in the best sense of the word.

Now I have to decide the next 800-page novel from my to-read list that I want to tackle next.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I've recently finished Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke and loved it. A rich sense of English history with occasional trips into magic and fantasy. A novel that is literary in the best sense of the word.

Now I have to decide the next 800-page novel from my to-read list that I want to tackle next.

Glad you liked it. It was a joy to read.

As for massive tomes...how about Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon?

Link to post
Share on other sites
As for massive tomes...how about Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon?

I waded through Cryptonomicon last year and found it worthwhile. I was afraid the myriad plot lines and characters would not coalesce at the end but they did.

After enjoying Cryptonomicon , Quicksilver and Zodiac I decided to try The System of the World, the first part of the Baroque Trilogy and got completely bogged down. I could never figure out where the plot was going. Has anybody made it through? Is it worth going back to?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have read Cryptonomicon and was very impressed with the story. I dug the mathematics/code stuff. If only the coursebooks I had to read in college were that interesting.

As far as massive tomes go, I've looked at the books in the Baroque cycle, and haven't yet gotten up the courage to dig into a trilogy of 800-900 page works. One of those at a time is enough for me. But maybe when I get caught up some more on my to-read list, I'll tackle those.

And The System of the World is the third part of the Baroque cycle, is it not?

Link to post
Share on other sites
And The System of the World is the third part of the Baroque cycle, is it not?

Yeah. I hope to tackle the Baroque cycle in the next few months. I think Stephenson considers them not as three separate books, but as one giant book that can't really be published as a 4000 page tower. (The end result is the same, I guess.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

Got three books in the mail over the last week and a half.

Christian Apologetics in the Postmodern World

What Would Jesus Deconstruct: The Good News of Postmodernism for the Church

Sexuality and the Christian Body

I'm looking forward to this last book as Rogers argues for "marriagelike homosexual relationships." It's suppose to be one of the best treatment coming from neither the traditional liberal or conservative angles that we usually hear.

Brandon

"God is so great and merciful that he does not require that we name him precisely. God is even willing to be anonymous for a time. Remember how God led the Three Wise Men from the East to Christ? The Wise Men did not know the God of Israel or Jesus. They worshipped the stars. So God used a star to lure them."--The Twelve Steps for Christians

myspace-animation-codes121.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger. I loved it. Niffenegger somehow managed to make time travelling seem something normal, while also writing a beautiful love story. Highly recommended.

Now I'm reading The Navigator of New York by Wayne Johnston.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am currently reading Watership Down by Richard Adams. I feel like everyone I know read it in either high school or college, except me of course. I think what drew me to this book were the references to it in Donnie Darko. It is an incredible story and it has given me a huge respect for rabbits. So far, one part that has really stuck out to me is the story in chapter 31 of El-ahrairah and the Black Rabbit of Inle. I particularly enjoyed the end of the story where Lord Frith tells El-ahrairah "Wisdom is found on the desolate hillside, El-ahrairah, where none comes to feed, and the stony bank where the rabbit scratches a hole in vain."

Anyways, this is probably old hat for most of your but thought I would share.

Tim

""Human speech is like a cracked pot on which we beat out rhythms for bears to dance to when we are striving to make music that will wring tears from the stars."

-Gustave Flaubert

Link to post
Share on other sites
Got three books in the mail over the last week and a half.

What Would Jesus Deconstruct: The Good News of Postmodernism for the Church

If you enjoy this book maybe you can read Graham Ward's Barth, Derrida, and the Language of Theology for me. I read an excerpt from it about a year ago and found it extremely intriguing.

"It is scandalous for Christians to have an imagination starved for God." - Mark Filiatreau

I write occasionally at Unfamiliar Stars.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Kyle,

Sorry, I didn't see your post as I have not "enable email notification of replies." I just checked online whether that book was at the university library and they have it. I'll have to take a gander.

Also, it looks as if D.A. Carson has a new book coming out in May: Christ and Culture Revisited

Brandon

"God is so great and merciful that he does not require that we name him precisely. God is even willing to be anonymous for a time. Remember how God led the Three Wise Men from the East to Christ? The Wise Men did not know the God of Israel or Jesus. They worshipped the stars. So God used a star to lure them."--The Twelve Steps for Christians

myspace-animation-codes121.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am reading the Oxford History of England, edited by Kennth O. Morgan. This was prompted by my realization that I really don't know much about Henry VIII other than the story of his six wives and his long feud with the Catholic Church.

Unfortunately, I really cannot recommend Mr. Morgan and his history of England. I want tales of knights, and kings, and stories of how the English managed to discover that blanc mange and eel pie were semi-edible. Instead, I'm getting page after page of the wheat harvest of <year> and its dire impact on the peasantry, complete with charts showing bushels per year. And not one mention of The Beatles. What kind of history is this?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I have just started "Above All Earthly Pow'rs: Christ in a Postmodern World" by David F. Wells.

We are part of the generation in which the image has triumphed over the word, when the visual is dominant over the verbal and where entertainment drowns out exposition. We may go so far as to claim that we live in an age of the image which is also the age of anti-word and potentially is the age of the lie. ~ Os Guiness

So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God (Romans 10:17)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished:

The Secret River, by Kate Grenville, novel about convict settlers in 18th c. Australia, which won a boatload of prizes.

The Book of Lost Things, by John Connolly, which draws on folk & fairy tales and Bettelheim's Uses of Enchantment to produce a remarkably effective coming-of-age fantasy.

About to begin:

Foreign Bodies, by Hwee Hwee Tan, described as "A dazzling fusion of Western pop culture, Christian mysticism and Taoist rituals, Foreign Bodies is a brilliantly multi-layered and decidedly humorous debut."

There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Read a little bit of this today. Craig Gay teaches at Regent. So far so good. Interestingly, Gay spoke about how we value everything according to the "monetary unit" such that this does not reflect and may actually obscure the real intrinsic value of the thing itself. Cash Values: Money and the Erosion of Meaning in Today's Society

A Matrix of Meanings: Finding God in Pop Culture

Fundamentalism

Barth, Derrida and the Language of Theology

Brandon

"God is so great and merciful that he does not require that we name him precisely. God is even willing to be anonymous for a time. Remember how God led the Three Wise Men from the East to Christ? The Wise Men did not know the God of Israel or Jesus. They worshipped the stars. So God used a star to lure them."--The Twelve Steps for Christians

myspace-animation-codes121.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

I've just finished the new Leif Enger novel, So Brave, Young, and Handsome, and loved it. The prose transported me into the world of these characters, and it seemed each sentence was masterfully constructed. It was like uncovering an untold myth of the old American West, a Western more in the style of Terrence Malick rather than John Ford.

I thought Enger surpassed his very fine first novel, Peace Like a River, because his voice was so strong throughout this book. And the most interesting character of the novel turned out to be one I didn't expect.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I've just finished the new Leif Enger novel, So Brave, Young, and Handsome, and loved it. The prose transported me into the world of these characters, and it seemed each sentence was masterfully constructed. It was like uncovering an untold myth of the old American West, a Western more in the style of Terrence Malick rather than John Ford.

I thought Enger surpassed his very fine first novel, Peace Like a River, because his voice was so strong throughout this book. And the most interesting character of the novel turned out to be one I didn't expect.

I enjoyed Peace Like a River, so I'll have to look for the new one.

I'm currently reading The Times are Never so Bad by Andre Dubus.

Ryan

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...