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The final worldwide number looks to be about $520 million... still not enough to take The Incredibles' #3 slot and likely to come up just behind The Simpsons' $525 million worldwide. But $530 million, beating out both films' positions, is possible

'Ratatouille' keeps cooking overseas

Fun-loving toon easily remained the market leader at the international box office over the Oct. 26-28 frame, with a hefty haul of $22.5 million, nearly double that of its closest competitor. That bumped up the international cume to $348.2 million, bringing the pic

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Variety says the film was #1 overseas this past weekend for the fifth straight week, and that it has raked in $371.8 million overseas ... which means it has inched ahead of The Incredibles to become Pixar's #2 film of all time overseas. It is still #3 worldwide (because The Incredibles did a lot better in North America). Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Nose on the Prize, but Which Oscar to Sniff?

Now the makers of "Ratatouille" are about to find out if Valiant also speaks for the movie academy in Hollywood. As the awards season heats up, the Walt Disney Company and its Pixar Animation Studios unit have been wrestling with a conundrum posed by their warmly received, computer-animated fable about a rat who aspires to become a Parisian chef: Any move to promote it as the year's best picture might lead to ballot-splitting that would diminish its chances of getting the less prestigious but more easily won Oscar for best animated film.

New York Times, November 28

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Surely this is a non-problem?

The vote-splitting phenomenon can certainly be a real factor, but I just don't see it applying here, in part because the competition for best animated feature is never all that stiff.

A foreign film that gets dual nods for best picture and foreign film can easily get some voters thinking "It's got my best picture vote, but for foreign film I want to honor something else," while others think "I'll give it my foreign film vote, but something else deserves best picture." And the film winds up losing both categories when it might have been a lock had it been nominated only for one.

Here, though, I just don't see anyone thinking "Ratatouille's got my best picture vote, but for best animated feature I want to honor something else." What? The Simpsons Movie? Shrek the Third? Beowulf? Bee Movie?

Even if you think there's another potentially award-worthy animated film out there, surely anyone voting Ratatouille for best picture will vote it also for best animated feature. I just don't see a best-picture nomination translating into lost animated-feature votes here.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

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FWIW, Persepolis and Ratatouille have closer Cream of the Crop Rotten Tomatoes rankings than any other two competitors for Best Animated Film yet, as far as I can tell. (They both have 100%.)

I don't think that the critical horserace here changes anything, because of Ratatouille's far broader exposure, but still, that's one reason the Times picked out Persepolis as Ratatouille's strongest competitor.

That's just how eye roll.

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Here, though, I just don't see anyone thinking "Ratatouille's got my best picture vote, but for best animated feature I want to honor something else." What? The Simpsons Movie? Shrek the Third? Beowulf? Bee Movie?
Persepolis?

A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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Yes, Persepolis is a good film indeed, and it would not be the first foreign film to win the six-year-old award: five years ago, Spirited Away won (its fellow nominees were Ice Age, Lilo & Stitch, Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron and Treasure Planet).

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Yes, Persepolis is a good film indeed, and it would not be the first foreign film to win the six-year-old award: five years ago, Spirited Away won (its fellow nominees were Ice Age, Lilo & Stitch, Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron and Treasure Planet).

And wow did Spirited Away richly deserve its win, and not just because nothing else that year came close. I know a lot more Miyazaki today than I did then, but I still find Spirited Away to be his finest achievement. If I ever put together a list of my personal 50 top films, it would definitely make the cut. I'm not sure it wouldn't crack my top 10.

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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  • 2 months later...

Just for the record, as of this weekend, Ratatouille is no longer one of the ten top-grossing films of 2007; it has been bumped down to #11.

Ratatouille is the only Pixar film that is not one of the five top-grossing films of its year. Toy Story was #1 in 1995, Finding Nemo was #2 in 2003, Toy Story 2 and Cars were #3 in 1999 and 2006 respectively, A Bug's Life and Monsters Inc were #4 in 1998 and 2001 respectively, and The Incredibles was #5 in 2004.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Just for the record, as of this weekend, Ratatouille is no longer one of the ten top-grossing films of 2007; it has been bumped down to #11.

Domestically, yes. Worldwide, however, it's still at #6 -- eight places ahead of the film that bumped it out of the top ten domestically.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

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SDG wrote:

: Domestically, yes. Worldwide, however, it's still at #6 . . .

Hmmm.

[ checking other worldwide charts ]

In terms of worldwide grosses, Toy Story was #1 for 1995 (very narrowly beating Die Hard with a Vengeance), Finding Nemo was #2 in 2003, Toy Story 2 and Monsters Inc. were #3 in 1999 and 2001 respectively, The Incredibles was #4 in 2004, A Bug's Life was #5 in 1998, and Cars was #6 in 2006.

So most of the previous films have ranked about as highly worldwide as they did in the U.S., give or take a notch, with the notable exceptions being Cars (#3 in the U.S., #6 worldwide) and Ratatouille (#11 in the U.S., #6 worldwide).

Only two Pixar films have lower ranks worldwide than they did in North America, i.e. A Bug's Life and Cars (the Lasseter-directed, Americana films).

And three Pixar films have higher ranks worldwide than they did in North America, i.e. Monsters Inc., The Incredibles and Ratatouille.

Only one film fell outside the top five in North America, i.e. Ratatouille; only two films fell outside the top five worldwide, i.e. Cars and Ratatouille.

Only one film fell outside the top ten in North America, i.e. Ratatouille; none of the films fell outside the top ten worldwide.

Of course, how a film ranks relative to other films may say as much about the other films as it does about the film in question.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 1 month later...

If there is such a thing as "Canada-specific stats for films," I guarantee you that Peter Chattaway is the man to ask. He may even be the elected official in charge of Canada-specific stats for films.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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metalfoot wrote:

: Let's see if I can be threadkiller here too... I found Ratatouille to be an excellent bit of film. Glad to hear it did so well world-wide. I'm wondering if there are Canada-specific stats for films?

You mean, box-office stats? I've been keeping track of the differences between the Canadian and "North American" top-ten charts for a few years now, and as of Ratatouille's last appearance in the Canadian top ten (on the weekend of August 10-12), it had grossed $13,660,000 in Canada and $193,369,000 in "North America". Since the "North American" figures include both the U.S. and Canada, that means Ratatouille had earned about 7.1% of its North American grosses on the north side of the border -- which is kind of a low figure, since Canada has 9.7% of the "North American" population. On the other hand, Ratatouille wasn't even in the "North American" top ten that week -- for the weekend of August 10-12, it was #10 in Canada but #13 in "North America" as a whole -- so the film may have had more staying power in Canada than it did in the States. (In its FIRST weekend, June 29-July 1, the film grossed only $2,180,000 in Canada and $47,227,000 in "North America" as a whole, giving Canada 4.6% of the first-weekend take -- though the low first weekend might have had something to do with the fact that July 1 is our national holiday. At any rate, the Canadian share of the "North American" gross did rise over the next couple months. Or, to put this another way, the film multiplied its first-weekend take in Canada by a factor of 6 or 7, while it multipled its first-weekend take in "North America" by a factor of only 4, and possibly less once you take Canada out of the "North American" equation.)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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which is kind of a low figure, since Canada has 9.7% of the "North American" population.

[tangetn]You mean I have to put French on each of my packages for less than 5% of my target distribution?! That's got to have a great NPV. [/grumble]

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Peter, can you provide a breakdown by province? I'm trying to determine the film's grosses in northern Saskatchewan.

Too much coffee for me this morning. Stuff goes straight to my head.

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Peter, can you provide a breakdown by province? I'm trying to determine the film's grosses in northern Saskatchewan.

Too much coffee for me this morning. Stuff goes straight to my head.

Well, I only saw the film once in the theatre. ;)

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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  • 3 weeks later...

Spot the Dick Cheney gag?

Shotgun-3-whole-web.jpg

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 2 months later...

I just finished Neal Gabler's biography of Walt Disney -- very good, by the way! -- and think it helped me appreciate this analysis of Ratatouille as a metaphorical history of Disney and Pixar.

Enjoy!

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Affirmation that I was on the right track, then, since my original, opening-day review made a very, very similar analogy...

Attention, parents, kids, anybody who appreciates good movies and great food! Ratatouille is a feast so fantastic you'll go running back for seconds. And if you pay close attention, you'll also see that it's a film that tells two great stories at the same time.

The first story is what you'll see on the big screen. And the second—at least the way I see it—is a more subtle, almost allegorical re-telling of what really happened to one of the 20th century's most-loved and enduring pop culture icons …. Walt Disney himself.

Once upon a time, there was an adventurous French chef named Auguste Gusteau (think Walt Disney) whose Paris kitchen (think Disney studios) was famous for awe-inspiring cuisine (Disney's classic animated features, like Pinocchio).

Gusteau knew his strengths and focused on them, serving up heaping plates of excellence to the delight of the customers at his self-titled restaurant. Gusteau's and its namesake became legendary worldwide.

But then, for one reason or another, the quality of his work began to falter. He died, and his successors (think …. Michael Eisner?) sold out, stamping the Gusteau (Disney) name on all manner of mediocrity. The master's face and name eventually flew like a banner over mediocre microwave meals (frivolous features like Pocahontas, and disposable straight-to-video sequels to Disney classics). And eventually his name represented fare that seemed completely unrelated to his legacy (The Muppets?).

And while the masses seemed content to choke down anything contained in a Gusteau can (or released on a Disney label), it looked like Gusteau's name would become synonymous with trash.

Enter Remy, a little rat with a nose for excellence and a passion for cooking. (Enter director Brad Bird, the brilliant storyteller and filmmaker behind The Iron Giant and The Incredibles.)

Remy would never, in normal circumstances, be allowed into the great Gusteau's kitchen. He's a rat after all, likely to be exterminated before his extraordinary talent wins the attention it deserves. (Bird's Iron Giant was badly botched by Warner Brothers, who didn't know that they had a classic on their hands. Thus it never got the box office it deserved.)

But then, Remy meets Linguini (voiced by Lou Romano), a gawky, insecure fellow who works as the kitchen garbage boy. He couldn't cook a microwave dinner if he tried. And yet, when Remy climbs beneath Linguini's chef hat and begins to direct Linguini around the kitchen by pulling on his hair—presto! Or should I say, Pesto?

Can a little guy with a big imagination step into that famous kitchen and restore it to its former glory? Yes. (And yes!)

With Remy's creative genius and Linguini's access to the pots, pans, and ingredients, a new Gusteau masterpiece is just a matter of time. (In the same way, Pixar's powerful chemistry has produced a string of masterpieces …. delivered with the Disney label: A Bug's Life, Toy Story 2, Monsters Inc., Finding Nemo, The Incredibles, and Cars.)

...

So go ahead, serve yourself a heaping plate of Ratatouille, which is likely to be remembered as 2007's summer moviegoing peak. It'll be hard for some to admit, but thanks to this Parisian fairy tale, Walt Disney Studios is once again the premiere filmmaking kitchen in America. Like those diners who swoon at the aroma wafting from Remy's restaurant, moviegoers will keep coming back for seconds, and thirds, so long as Brad Bird is in the kitchen.

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Affirmation that I was on the right track, then, since my original, opening-day review made a very, very similar analogy...

You said it better (and in much more detail) than I did.

Ironically, much like Skinner cashing in on Gusteau

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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