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The Rider


  1. Directed by: Chloé Zhao
  2. Produced by:
  3. Written by:
  4. Music by:
  5. Cinematography by:
  6. Editing by:
  7. Release Date: 2017
  8. Running Time: 104
  9. Language: English

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix

Tender, empathetic, and visually rich, Chloé Zhao’s contemporary neo-Western both affirms and subverts its generic roots, deconstructing and reconstructing the masculinity, violence, and individualism of the American myth of the Cowboy. The titular rider here is Brady (Brady Jandreau), a rodeo cowboy and horse trainer in the badlands of South Dakota—Zhao originally was filming a documentary, which evolved into a fictional interpretation of Brady’s real-life experiences. Recovering from a severe head injury after being thrown from his horse in a rodeo competition, Brady’s very identity has been shaken by the fall. Unable to ride until he recovers (if he ever recovers at all), he’s forced to watch from the sidelines and learn what it means to rest and heal. Living with his alcoholic father Tim (Tim Jandreau) and his younger sister Lilly (Lilly Jandreau), Brady trains horses with a pastoral vocation and mission, a dedication to the craft without devolving into obsession. It’s who he is–he’s a Cowboy with a capital ‘C.’ At one point he tells Lilly that just as mustangs were made by God to run on the plains, cowboys were made to ride. Yet with the lingering physical effects of his injury forcing him to remain on foot, Brady is forced to confront the very sources of his self, what distinguishes Brady The Cowboy from Brady The Human Being. And this human being prays to the God who created him and the horses he loves, prayers characterized by a simple sincerity and beauty, floating up to heaven like sparks from a campfire. Marked by its beautiful cinematography and sincere performances, The Rider is a film overflowing with life. 
– Joel Mayward


  1. Directed by: Chloé Zhao
  2. Produced by:
  3. Written by:
  4. Music by:
  5. Cinematography by:
  6. Editing by:
  7. Release Date: 2017
  8. Running Time: 104
  9. Language: English

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix

Tender, empathetic, and visually rich, Chloé Zhao’s contemporary neo-Western both affirms and subverts its generic roots, deconstructing and reconstructing the masculinity, violence, and individualism of the American myth of the Cowboy. The titular rider here is Brady (Brady Jandreau), a rodeo cowboy and horse trainer in the badlands of South Dakota—Zhao originally was filming a documentary, which evolved into a fictional interpretation of Brady’s real-life experiences. Recovering from a severe head injury after being thrown from his horse in a rodeo competition, Brady’s very identity has been shaken by the fall. Unable to ride until he recovers (if he ever recovers at all), he’s forced to watch from the sidelines and learn what it means to rest and heal. Living with his alcoholic father Tim (Tim Jandreau) and his younger sister Lilly (Lilly Jandreau), Brady trains horses with a pastoral vocation and mission, a dedication to the craft without devolving into obsession. It’s who he is–he’s a Cowboy with a capital ‘C.’ At one point he tells Lilly that just as mustangs were made by God to run on the plains, cowboys were made to ride. Yet with the lingering physical effects of his injury forcing him to remain on foot, Brady is forced to confront the very sources of his self, what distinguishes Brady The Cowboy from Brady The Human Being. And this human being prays to the God who created him and the horses he loves, prayers characterized by a simple sincerity and beauty, floating up to heaven like sparks from a campfire. Marked by its beautiful cinematography and sincere performances, The Rider is a film overflowing with life. 
– Joel Mayward

Tender, empathetic, and visually rich, Chloé Zhao’s contemporary neo-Western both affirms and subverts its generic roots, deconstructing and reconstructing the masculinity, violence, and individualism of the American myth of the Cowboy. The titular rider here is Brady (Brady Jandreau), a rodeo cowboy and horse trainer in the badlands of South Dakota—Zhao originally was filming a documentary, which evolved into a fictional interpretation of Brady’s real-life experiences. Recovering from a severe head injury after being thrown from his horse in a rodeo competition, Brady’s very identity has been shaken by the fall. Unable to ride until he recovers (if he ever recovers at all), he’s forced to watch from the sidelines and learn what it means to rest and heal. Living with his alcoholic father Tim (Tim Jandreau) and his younger sister Lilly (Lilly Jandreau), Brady trains horses with a pastoral vocation and mission, a dedication to the craft without devolving into obsession. It’s who he is–he’s a Cowboy with a capital ‘C.’ At one point he tells Lilly that just as mustangs were made by God to run on the plains, cowboys were made to ride. Yet with the lingering physical effects of his injury forcing him to remain on foot, Brady is forced to confront the very sources of his self, what distinguishes Brady The Cowboy from Brady The Human Being. And this human being prays to the God who created him and the horses he loves, prayers characterized by a simple sincerity and beauty, floating up to heaven like sparks from a campfire. Marked by its beautiful cinematography and sincere performances, The Rider is a film overflowing with life. 
– Joel Mayward


  1. Directed by: Chloé Zhao
  2. Produced by:
  3. Written by:
  4. Music by:
  5. Cinematography by:
  6. Editing by:
  7. Release Date: 2017
  8. Running Time: 104
  9. Language: English

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix
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