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Ida


  1. Directed by: Pawel Pawlikowski
  2. Produced by:
  3. Written by: Pawel Pawlikowski
    Rebecca Lenkiewicz
  4. Music by: Kristian Eidnes Andersen
  5. Cinematography by: Ryszard Lenczewski
    Lukasz Zal
  6. Editing by: Jaroslaw Kaminski
  7. Release Date: 2013
  8. Running Time: 82
  9. Language: Polish, Latin, French

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix

In his most recent film, director Pawel Pawlikowski grapples with belief, loss, and religious ambiguity in 1960s Communist Poland. The story’s protagonist, a novitiate nun named Anna, is suddenly faced with a crisis of faith when she learns of her family’s dark history. Submersion in the past eventually pushes Anna to question not only her personal identity, but also her commitment to God. Shot in rich monochrome, Ida uses disproportional angles and off-center framing to convey the feeling that life isn’t always as symmetrical as one would like. With powerful performances and a patient, lingering presence, Ida paints a beautiful portrait of faith by showing us that faith isn’t always so beautiful.  — Wade Bearden (Christ and Pop Culture; WadeBearden.com)


  1. Directed by: Pawel Pawlikowski
  2. Produced by:
  3. Written by: Pawel Pawlikowski
    Rebecca Lenkiewicz
  4. Music by: Kristian Eidnes Andersen
  5. Cinematography by: Ryszard Lenczewski
    Lukasz Zal
  6. Editing by: Jaroslaw Kaminski
  7. Release Date: 2013
  8. Running Time: 82
  9. Language: Polish, Latin, French

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix

In his most recent film, director Pawel Pawlikowski grapples with belief, loss, and religious ambiguity in 1960s Communist Poland. The story’s protagonist, a novitiate nun named Anna, is suddenly faced with a crisis of faith when she learns of her family’s dark history. Submersion in the past eventually pushes Anna to question not only her personal identity, but also her commitment to God. Shot in rich monochrome, Ida uses disproportional angles and off-center framing to convey the feeling that life isn’t always as symmetrical as one would like. With powerful performances and a patient, lingering presence, Ida paints a beautiful portrait of faith by showing us that faith isn’t always so beautiful.  — Wade Bearden (Christ and Pop Culture; WadeBearden.com)

In his most recent film, director Pawel Pawlikowski grapples with belief, loss, and religious ambiguity in 1960s Communist Poland. The story’s protagonist, a novitiate nun named Anna, is suddenly faced with a crisis of faith when she learns of her family’s dark history. Submersion in the past eventually pushes Anna to question not only her personal identity, but also her commitment to God. Shot in rich monochrome, Ida uses disproportional angles and off-center framing to convey the feeling that life isn’t always as symmetrical as one would like. With powerful performances and a patient, lingering presence, Ida paints a beautiful portrait of faith by showing us that faith isn’t always so beautiful.  — Wade Bearden (Christ and Pop Culture; WadeBearden.com)


  1. Directed by: Pawel Pawlikowski
  2. Produced by:
  3. Written by: Pawel Pawlikowski
    Rebecca Lenkiewicz
  4. Music by: Kristian Eidnes Andersen
  5. Cinematography by: Ryszard Lenczewski
    Lukasz Zal
  6. Editing by: Jaroslaw Kaminski
  7. Release Date: 2013
  8. Running Time: 82
  9. Language: Polish, Latin, French

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix
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