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Tokyo Story


  1. Directed by:
  2. Produced by:
  3. Written by:
  4. Music by:
  5. Cinematography by:
  6. Editing by:
  7. Release Date: 1953
  8. Running Time: 136
  9. Language: Japanese

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix

Films by Japanese master Yasujiro Ozu (1903-1963) are beautiful, stylistically unique lessons in generational contrasts and familial transitions. Tokyo Story, routinely making the cut for the top five films of all time, is no exception. Ostensibly the story of elderly parents visiting their children in faraway Tokyo and Osaka, it reflects upon how children grow geographically and emotionally apart from their parents with time. Indeed, symbols of time and ephemerality – watches, smoke wisps, train whistles, the buzz of locusts – populate and surround every major scene. What could be maudlin or melodramatic in lesser hands is, with Ozu, a wise meditation on accepting loss, happiness, and disappointment with dignity and equanimity. -- Andrew Spitznas

 


  1. Directed by:
  2. Produced by:
  3. Written by:
  4. Music by:
  5. Cinematography by:
  6. Editing by:
  7. Release Date: 1953
  8. Running Time: 136
  9. Language: Japanese

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix

Films by Japanese master Yasujiro Ozu (1903-1963) are beautiful, stylistically unique lessons in generational contrasts and familial transitions. Tokyo Story, routinely making the cut for the top five films of all time, is no exception. Ostensibly the story of elderly parents visiting their children in faraway Tokyo and Osaka, it reflects upon how children grow geographically and emotionally apart from their parents with time. Indeed, symbols of time and ephemerality – watches, smoke wisps, train whistles, the buzz of locusts – populate and surround every major scene. What could be maudlin or melodramatic in lesser hands is, with Ozu, a wise meditation on accepting loss, happiness, and disappointment with dignity and equanimity. -- Andrew Spitznas

 

Films by Japanese master Yasujiro Ozu (1903-1963) are beautiful, stylistically unique lessons in generational contrasts and familial transitions. Tokyo Story, routinely making the cut for the top five films of all time, is no exception. Ostensibly the story of elderly parents visiting their children in faraway Tokyo and Osaka, it reflects upon how children grow geographically and emotionally apart from their parents with time. Indeed, symbols of time and ephemerality – watches, smoke wisps, train whistles, the buzz of locusts – populate and surround every major scene. What could be maudlin or melodramatic in lesser hands is, with Ozu, a wise meditation on accepting loss, happiness, and disappointment with dignity and equanimity. -- Andrew Spitznas

 


  1. Directed by:
  2. Produced by:
  3. Written by:
  4. Music by:
  5. Cinematography by:
  6. Editing by:
  7. Release Date: 1953
  8. Running Time: 136
  9. Language: Japanese

Clips

  1. A&F Discussion Thread
  2. IMDb.com
  3. Wikipedia
  4. Netflix
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