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Overstreet

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Everything posted by Overstreet

  1. Title: Wings of DesireDirector: Wim WendersYear: 1987Language: German, English, French, Turkish, Hebrew, Spanish, JapaneseIMDB Link: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0093191/YouTube Link (a clip of/trailer for the film): Link to the A&F thread on the film (if there is one): There is one! From 2003! http://artsandfaith.com/index.php?/topic/224-wings-of-desire-1987/
  2. Title: The New WorldDirector: Terrence MalickYear: 2005Language: English / AlgonquinIMDB Link: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0402399/YouTube Link (a clip of/trailer for the film): Link to the A&F thread on the film (if there is one): http://artsandfaith.com/index.php?/topic/1900-the-new-world-2005/
  3. It's not currently streaming anywhere. It might show up on Filmstruck soon, since it's a Criterion title.
  4. Mine too, unless you include documentaries. I've seen it three times now, and it just gets sweeter. So, how many people here noticed the two amazing cameo appearances among Paterson's bus passengers? (I think it's in-your-face obvious, but I've seen the movie with folks who didn't recognize them at all.) WAIT — before you answer, you might want to spoiler-text any reply. It's too good of a surprise to ruin for people. To Tyler's question: I think the emphasis on twins is playful in a variety of ways. First of all, his wife dreams that they become the parents of twins. He jokingly says, "One for each of us." The idea lodges in his subconscious, and he starts seeing them everywhere. And we've all had that experience, right? You learn a new word, and suddenly you realize that it's all around you and you've just never noticed. Also, one of his poems begins "We have plenty of matches in our house." The word "matches" becomes a flexible term, just like it would for an attentive poet. He has "matches on the brain," so to speak. This is so typical of poets. Multiple meanings for words don't just occur to them; being aware of a variety of definitions for a word awakens you to creative possibilities of expression and interpretation. Also, when you see twins, you immediately start looking for subtle differences. Paterson is an observer of subtleties.
  5. The excerpt Brian posted above works just fine as a review of Knight of Cups, in my opinion. (I revisited that last night.)
  6. Streaming on Netflix in the U.S.
  7. Overstreet

    Moonlight

    I've seen all kinds of stories about characters who suffer severely. Some of them were characters who seemed real to me. Others didn't. Chiron didn't. It's a matter of characterization. He seemed contrived to me. I also haven't seen particularly compelling evidence of how Chiron "resonated so deeply with the Black and gay community." I've seen a lot of enthusiasm from moviegoers who talk a lot more about how excited they are to see a well-crafted film about Black characters and about gay characters — and that is, indeed, something worth celebrating. But most of the buzz has been about how "we finally have a well made movie of this kind" and the socio-political significance of that than about the details of Chiron's character. This is now "Sheesh, stop hurting so much." This is about storytelling. Teaching fiction, I see a lot of stories coming from students which are the same story — a cipher-like character suffers the outrageous behaviors of crazy parents, intolerant neighbors, abusive lovers, etc., etc., and it's my job to help them find a *story* in there. Please keep in mind — I did not dislike this movie. I just found aspects of it frustrating and disappointing, so that I did not experience much suspension of disbelief. That's not a fact I can turn back the clock and change. Don't make me into Moonlight's enemy.
  8. Now streaming on Amazon Prime in the U.S.
  9. One of my students is aiming to write a research paper on the films of Mel Gibson and his inclination to focus on characters who suffer injustice, persecution, and rejection. She wrote to me after searching for sources, saying, Have any of you come across (or written) substantial studies of Mel Gibson's body of work outside of the usual Passion of the Christ pieces?
  10. One of my students is aiming to write a research paper on the films of Mel Gibson and his inclination to focus on characters who suffer injustice, persecution, and rejection. She wrote to me after searching for sources, saying, Have any of you come across (or written) substantial studies of Mel Gibson's body of work outside of the usual Passion of the Christ pieces?
  11. My research-paper students, who are focused on writing about film, are beginning work on their major projects. I've introduced them to Arts & Faith, hoping that some of them might venture into this community with some questions related to their research, to draw upon your expertise. So... as a test case: Let's say I'm writing a research paper about the experience of children raised in a Buddhist tradition. What films would you recommend I watch as preliminary research? Kundun? What else? Have you come across any interviews with filmmakers who discuss portrayals of Buddhism in film? Are there particular texts you would recommend — both about Buddhism on film, and about the experiences of children raised in that tradition?
  12. Loved it. Here's my review. I'm trying to figure out why there's a B- / A- gap between SDG's review and mine. I suspect it's because he has much more invested in the Batman legacy than I do, so he's grading this one with considerable concern for the quality of this Batman narrative. I'm thinking of it first and foremost as a sendup of comic book superhero movies, and only secondly as a Batman story. And, as I've never been able to take Batman seriously as a character, I'm more inclined to like a movie that laughs at him than I am to like one that doesn't.
  13. Overstreet

    Computer Chess

    Now streaming on Amazon Prime in the U.S.
  14. And now it's streaming on Netflix in the U.S.
  15. Now streaming on Amazon Prime! https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06VSQ5TJ4/
  16. Good heavens. That's what they call "a departure."
  17. I knew that reviews from certain evangelical sources were going to be horrifying, but wow... that doesn't make it any easier to read them. That hurt. In other news... I'm interviewing Scorsese today. Looks like I have a surprising amount of time to ask questions. Does anyone have any burning questions they'd like me to consider working into my plan?
  18. Now streaming on Netflix Instant in the U.S.
  19. That's who I thought it sounded like too. I was expecting Dafoe.
  20. I found Whiplash to be extremely cynical. So I won't be surprised if I agree. I'm seeing La La Land in an hour.
  21. You who watch short films: I want to begin my research-paper course for art students by showing a short film that asks viewers to see the world through the eyes of someone quite unlike themselves. That's the main motif of the feature-length film-viewing for this class: Movies that make us consider how the world looks to those who are unlike us. I'm toying with possible showings of Timbuktu, either A Separation or The Past, Taxi, possibly Munyurangabo, Children of Heaven, and others that take us around the globe. (I'm open to feature-length suggestions, but it'll be a short list that I ask students to watch, because it's a writing class first and a film class second.) I wish I could show Tangerine, but no... that wouldn't fly. Anyway, for the short, I'm thinking of showing "Loin du 16e," the chapter from Paris, Je T'aime in which the young mother of an infant travels across town to work as a nanny for rich white folks. But I'm wondering if you can think of any other shorts that would fit the bill. Do you know any great short films that show us the world through the eyes of someone who is part of a neglected, oppressed, or overlooked community?
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