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Backrow Baptist

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About Backrow Baptist

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Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    Law Enforcement
  • Favorite movies
    Manhunter Serpico Donnie Darko Heat The Outlaw Josey Wales
  1. Watched it with my wife. It wasn't as bad as I feared. The figure talking to Abraham at the destrucion of Sodom seemed intentionally to look like what we later see of Jesus. I actually liked the idea of including the pre-incarnate Christ but there must be better and more biblical ways. The moments of Abraham's anguish over trusting in God's promises, the near sacrifice of Isaac in particular, worked for me. That being said, I have alot of gripes. Having Noah tell the creation story from the ark was an interesting way to telescope an already 10 hour mini series but it reduces everything pre-
  2. This seems like as good a place as any to jump back in. Django Unchained is the first Tarantino film I have really disliked and have no desire to see again any time soon. As others have pointed out, you can feel the loss of Sally Menke's influence. In particular the shootouts at the end were sloppy, and not just because of the gushing blood and splooshing sounds whenever a bullet hits bad guy after bad guy. Even in the House of Blue Leaves sequence in Kill Bill Volume 1, there is a deliberate quality to how the action is staged and cut and I never felt bored by it. I actually got bored during
  3. I'm still holding out hope for that stand alone special edition blu-ray. I've read mixed reviews on that Hannibal Lecter Anthology, but I'm really tempted now after reading your comments. Without endorsing Neitzsche, I'm reminded of the famous line "Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.". Real life FBI profiler John Douglas made that the title of his book about hunting serial killers. Great book btw.
  4. Doc Hollywood/ Cars The hero gets stuck in a small town on his way to "success" in the big city. He learns to accept the small town values and finds happiness.
  5. Those are the shots (though I also like the one in Clockers quite a bit). Given the fairly clear context of the film, which is brought into focus in the conversation that takes place overlooking the tower footprints, I think it is fair to interpret much of what goes on in 25th Hour through the post-9/11 lens. The dolly shots in this film, in comparison to other uses of the same shot, seem to suggest that the way it disconnects characters from the frame itself is a handy expression of how it feels to party in Manhattan post-9/11. It riffs a bit on the "no poetry after the Holocaust" axiom.
  6. Not sure if this counts but, the "Sister Christian"/ "Jessie's Girl" drug deal gone bad in Boogie Nights. There's a moment while they are all sitting on the couch waiting for Alfred Molina to finish playing around with the fireworks and hi-fi cassette player, so they can sell him fake cocaine. Wahlberg/ Dirk stares off into space for as if he's in deep thought. Dirk seems to have a rare moment of clarity that leads him to get up off the couch and walk out. For my money it's one of the best moments in the film and in the commentary PT Anderson says it wasn't planned. In Snow Angels there's
  7. From Patton Oswalt's recent essay for wired. Wake Up, Geek Culture. Time to Die.
  8. Right now my plan is to play a few short clips from my DVDs or ripped and embedded into the Powerpoint. I expect most of the attendance will be high school and college age members who have already seen the films covered. The youth pastor is interested in maybe getting a group together to see Thor or Captain America, (or one of the other bazillion superhero films) in the theater. As for analysis, yes that's a concern. Here's how I ended my email pitch to the youth pastor. "Please know that I have no desire to wedge God into a comic book. Christ is more than just another superhero. My h
  9. Ok, I couldn't find a thread on this but if there is already one please post a link. Basically, our youth pastor is on board with me putting together a church class on superhero films. This would be specifically superhero films, not"Comic book movies" per se. I don't know exactly how many weeks it would last, but probably around 5-8. I proposed these books as reference. - “Hollywood Worldviews” by Brian Godawa as a basic introduction to assessing a film’s worldviews and themes from a biblical perspective. He discusses some superhero movies like The Dark Knight. This is also the book I woul
  10. What a great film. Thank you for that Jeffrey. I can't wait for my 3 year old to get a little older so I can show it to her. There was so much about it that was over my head when I saw it at 8 years old. I didn't know what "meta" meant, but now I see the complex brilliance of Kermit in the film reading the script of his own story from the beginning until he catches up with himself at that point within the film. Charlie Kaufman was out there paying attention somewhere. I didn't know that big fat man behind the desk in Hollywood was this guy named Orson Welles who made films I would grow up to d
  11. Here it is. Manhunter Q&A
  12. So ... What did you think? Which version did they show? I went online and found the video of the Q&A after the screening. Found it disappointing. I didn't hear Mann share much that isn't on the Manhunter DVDs. I was hoping for some word on a stand alone blu-ray will all the extras and different versions, similar to the Brazil and Blade Runner box sets.
  13. Donnie Darko has already been taken so I'll say another good Gyllenhaal performance in October Sky , but more for the father/son relationship with Chris Cooper. Favorite Great Surrogate Family The Outlaw Josey Wales
  14. That does explain alot. The moment the film started going off the rails for me was the weird, techno style score during the first street big brawl.
  15. I'm finishing up season 1 of the Mann produced TV series Crime Story. Mann's Heat consultant Chuck Adamson (a real life retired Chicago detective) co-wrote and produced the series. On the Heat DVD Mann described how Adamson was investigating a high line burglar and actually invited him to sit down for coffee, which inspired Pacino and Deniro's famous sit down. There are alot of interesting parallels between Crime Story and Heat. Several lines of dialogue appear in both. For example there's "They haven't invented a hard time we can't handle"/ "Ain't a hard time invented I can't handle.", an
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