Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Why does it matter?'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • The Arts
    • Film
    • Music
    • Television & Radio
    • Literature & Creative Writing
    • Visual Art, Architecture, & Design
    • Theater & Dance
    • Broad Brush -- The Arts in General
    • Announcements
  • The Wider World
    • Faith Matters
    • The Good Life
    • Science & Technology
    • Games
    • Catch-All
  • About You, About Us
    • About IMAGE
    • About this Website
    • Short-Term Parking

Location


Interests


Occupation


About my avatar


Favorite movies


Favorite music


Favorite creative writing


Favorite visual art

Found 1 result

  1. Over at The Curator there is a recent article on music called "The Tyranny of Taste" It is another appeal to an objective quality and standard of beauty in art. While my opinion on this matter can be easily found here and on other forums (I personally think the cry for recognition and adherence to objective standards stems more from a fight for authority and control, and a bit of self-righteousness, than an actual search to understand beauty, beauty needs no defending), my question is why do so many people care? Let's say it is possible to clearly define and explain beauty in a manner that has unquestionable universal application and does not rely on human interpretation. What happens if beauty, or art or taste or where ever the discussion occurs, is empirically shown to be objective? What happens if it is shown to be subjective? What happens if it is shown that it ultimately doesn't matter? Do we think art will change one way or the other? Will we be able to pass laws to make some (currently legal) art illegal and incarcerate the offenders? Will that make a better world? Does God stop being God? Is our faith for naught? Why this importance for objectivity (implicitly intellectual and quantifiable) on a human level? Will the world really go to hell in a handbasket one way or the other? With this article in particular, there is an appeal to be open to things one might not like and finding value outside one's preferences that I am sympathetic to. Frankly, I find the disparaged perspective of "I like Bach, you like Bon Jovi, praise the Lord anyhow" to be more open than not to allowing value to something one might not like. Just something I've been pondering lately, Joe
×