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Found 2 results

  1. Hey y'all- While I am loathe to post the same stuff in two areas, I couldn't decide whether this was more film-like or musical. So, I'm posting in both places. Pardon if that is poor etiquitte. The crux of the situation is that I am currently working on a documentary about the band Luxury for which I am raising support via Kickstarter. A trailer can be viewed here: https://www.kickstar...y-autobiography or here https://vimeo.com/120423456 Here's a bit of background on the band: ____________________________________________________ THE BAND: Luxury is a band that began in the 1990's in the small town of Toccoa GA, but from the start, it was clear that their aspirations and influences were elsewhere. Sounding like Fugazi or Shudder to Think fronted by a younger, more vicious Morrissey, they were an anomaly, in Toccoa, or almost anywhere. They brought together such disparate influences that one could barely imagine them co-existing in a band, much less pulling it off as a thoroughly distinctive sound. The English melodicism laid on top of such pummeling instrumentation was a study in contrasts, but it was of a piece, as there was enough of the melodic in the instruments and enough brutality in the lyrics and vocal delivery that it hung together, just so. As singer, Lee Bozeman describes it, "I write these beautiful, nice songs, and then the band destroys them." Upon the release of their first record, Amazing and Thank You (1995), Luxury seemed poised to move to another level, but a wreck in the summer of 1995 (with tour-mates and fellow Georgians, Piltdown Man) had the opposite impact. All told, there were 3 broken necks between both bands, with Bozeman sustaining the most devastating internal injuries. The wreck changed their fortunes as well (evidently) as their ambitions. With each successive record, there was a greater sense of self-reflection in Bozeman's lyrics, and the music followed that deepening maturity, all the while maintaining the fundamental dichotomy of soaring melodies on top of angular post-punk instrumentation. The first record was essentially a document of their live shows, which were remarkable events in their intensity and the band's posture of defiance directed even at their own audience. On successive records, though, Luxury learned to use the studio as an instrument. While, on the first record Bozeman asks "So, what do you expect from life?" he seems to have spent each of the following records seeking to answer that very question. Causation is a notoriously slippery force to get one's hands around. Yet, humanly speaking, it is hard not to point to the wreck of 1995 when hoping to understand how three members of Luxury are now Eastern Orthodox priests (the other two members are an ordained Presbyterian [PCA] elder and an occasional Lutheran board of directors member, surely cementing their status as one of the most ordained bands in history). Now, it is doubtlessly a noteworthy fact that members of a band went on to become priests, as members of most bands are obliged to go on and do something different with their lives. But what can it mean for a band led by priests to continue making records? On their newly recorded fifth album, Trophies, the lyrical themes may be said to be further musings on the expectations and memories of life. But as with prior Luxury records, spiritual concerns are obliquely addressed, if at all. So does Luxury sound anything like a band full of priests? There are several legitimate answers: 1. Who can say? There are no others. 2. Self-evidently they do. For they are. 3. No. They don't even sound like Christians. ___________________________________________________ It is maybe worth mentioning that I play guitar with Luxury, and it is very possible that it is lame to make a film about one's own band. Check out the trailer, sort that out and let me know. By all means, feel free to share this trailer with your closest living relatives. Thanks, Matt Hinton
  2. Greetings all- As some of you may know, I am currently working on a documentary about the band Luxury. I am raising support via Kickstarter (11 days left!) and a trailer can be viewed here: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2019093747/luxury-documentary-biography-autobiography or here https://vimeo.com/120423456 Here's a synopsis: "Biography / Autobiography: A Story of a Band Called Luxury" will trace the path of Luxury, a band who, on the cusp of success, suffered a devastating wreck. In the intervening years, they continue to make records and three members of the band become Eastern Orthodox priests. Through interviews and archival footage, Biography / Autobiography will tell the gripping and poignant story of Luxury and will follow the making of a new record, now as priests. Perhaps it is relevant to your interests. Naturally, I would be very grateful if you were to share this amongst your friends, neighbors, colleagues, and children. Tally ho! Matt Hinton
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