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The Dark Knight (2008)


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I like it a lot, but based on this, I'm a little skeptical. Maybe it's just the image quality, but it does look a little Photoshopped to me. That being said, I hope that it's at least indicative of the look that Nolan is going for.

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opus wrote:

: I like it a lot, but based on this, I'm a little skeptical.

It looks plausible to me, even given the other photo, but I have questions about the teeth. Are they going to CGI that?

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
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Incidentally, this Los Angeles Times piece that I've been avoiding for the last few days indicates that the photo Overstreet linked to is, if not legit, at least pointing in the right direction. Aaron Eckhart says: "I can tell you that, basically, when you look at Two-Face, you should get sick to your stomach. Being the guy under all that, well, that was a lot of fun for me. It's like you would feel if you met someone whose face had pretty much been ripped off or burned off with acid. . . . There are fans on the Internet who have done artist's versions of what they think it will look like, and I can tell you this: They're thinking small; Chris is going way farther than people think." The article also says "the wounds are structurally deeper than in the comics".

Incidentally, the reason I've been avoiding this story is because everyone who has linked to it has said that it contains at least one major spoiler. And, uh, yeah, it does. And the spoiler in question is actually hinted at in the new trailer, so I am wondering if this spoiler comes up fairly early in the film, and is thus considered something that doesn't have to be kept all that secret. Or maybe the spoiler got through because no one's name was used (though it doesn't take a whole lot of smarts to figure out who a certain noun refers to). At any rate, BE WARNED before you click on that link.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Incidentally, the reason I've been avoiding this story is because everyone who has linked to it has said that it contains at least one major spoiler. And, uh, yeah, it does. And the spoiler in question is actually hinted at in the new trailer, so I am wondering if this spoiler comes up fairly early in the film, and is thus considered something that doesn't have to be kept all that secret. Or maybe the spoiler got through because no one's name was used (though it doesn't take a whole lot of smarts to figure out who a certain noun refers to). At any rate, BE WARNED before you click on that link.

Tell me about it. If the rumors are true and Eckhart is saying what it appears that he is saying then that trailer served up a major spoiler for all to see.

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FWIW, that image of Two-Face has been taken down from Ain't It Cool News and the site they got it from, Comic Book Resource, which seems to me like an indication that the image is genuine (or genuine enough). In the meantime, however, Jeffrey Wells has posted it, too -- and FWIW, one of the commenters there says the image may be "concept art" rather than on-set make-up.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Summer viral campaigns: Feeling pinpricked yet?

Viral marketing has gone positively bubonic. While this unconventional approach to building buzz online is nothing new, it has achieved full-blown plague status in the walk-up to the summer movie season. . . .

Gone are the days when marketing a movie online involved simply buying a URL like DarkKnight.com and uploading a trailer. Warner Bros. has launched more than 30 Web sites during the past year in support of the latest in the "Batman" franchise, a trail of virtual bread crumbs intended to sate fans until the July 18 release.

Although the bulk of these campaigns play out on the Internet, they also frequently move offline, often in the form of wacky public events intended to amass die-hard enthusiasts. One "Knight" site provides clues pointing to screenings that were scheduled for Monday in 12 different cities, including Hollywood & Highland.

But fans expecting a handy online guide that lists dates and locations for the screening will be disappointed. Instead, you'll arrive at a spooky Web site featuring portraits of presidents whose images had been defaced by the telltale makeup of the Joker. Clicking on each portrait links to a set of coordinates that require accessing Google Maps to decipher.

Nothing is ever simple in viral marketing. Take the sheer depth of the "Knight" campaign, in which dozens of seemingly marginal elements of the film have Web sites of their own, including a fictional bank, a travel agency -- even a deli, for crying out loud. Some are simple, single-page trifles, while others lead into games that would require wartime code-breaking skills to maneuver.

That's viral marketing for you -- compelling, creative and intricate but above all just plain exhausting. Since when should marketing feel like doing homework? . . .

Hollywood Reporter, April 29

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I don't think I really believe in the concept of a Batman spoiler. What's to spoil? We all know that Batman will survive the movie, that the themes will be the same as they've been since the late 30's, that the iconography will be riffing off of the same set of images that were mixed and remixed in all of those Legends of the Dark Knight comics. The only suspense for me relates to the kinds of things that can't be spoiled in advance, like the actual acting and filmmaking. Will Heath Ledger sucessfully pull of a kind of satanic lunacy or will he just be hammy? Will the action sequences be silly, mind numbing or thrilling? The actual twists of the plot hardly matter (as long as there is one), becuase what does it mean if the Joker is killed or not killed at the end of the movie? All of these villains have died a thousand times by now. Death is meaningless in comic books. That's half the point.

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A brief, new clip of what might be Harvey Dent's first appearance as Two-Face -- or at least the back of his head's first appearance -- is now up at WhySoSerious.com. Personally, I'm a wee bit miffed that we hear not one but TWO profane uses of Jesus' name in this 30-second clip. Only a wee bit, but still, of all the cusses out there, it's my least-favorite.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Personally, I'm a wee bit miffed that we hear not one but TWO profane uses of Jesus' name in this 30-second clip. Only a wee bit, but still, of all the cusses out there, it's my least-favorite.

I'm with you on that one.

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Personally, I'm a wee bit miffed that we hear not one but TWO profane uses of Jesus' name in this 30-second clip. Only a wee bit, but still, of all the cusses out there, it's my least-favorite.
I'm with you on that one.

Likewise.

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Possible major spoiler in this new TV spot (though nothing you wouldn't have already gleaned from that Aaron Eckhart interview a while back):

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Someone has seen it over at Aint It Cool

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/37214

He compares it to both Heat and The Godfather 2.

Seriously.

I have to say, as much as I liked Batman Begins and anticipate this new one, I can't help but think it's getting a wee bit overhyped. Seriously, I have heard people online discussing how Heath Ledger is going to give the best performance in cinema history and how they would sell their newborn children to see the film early. Come on. I know they may have been exaggerating, but at this point, if Nolan turns in a merely "good" film, it will be widely seen as a failure. I think half of the love for Batman Begins (at least for me) was seeing Batman finally taken seriously, we had no expectations after the Schumacher travesties. The first kinda snuck up on me, while this new one is hammering into my skull how incredible it will be with all the advance hype. I hope it's good, but until I see it I am going to steer clear of hype so that I can be unbiased.

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The conclusion of Batman Begins -- the "I don't have to save you" moment -- is something that I have trouble forgiving. But the rest of the film is too good to be spoiled by one moment of typical comic book comeuppance.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

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Overstreet wrote:

: The conclusion of Batman Begins -- the "I don't have to save you" moment -- is something that I have trouble forgiving.

[ blink ]

Really? That was one of the BRILLIANT things about that film. It was one of the things that told me the filmmakers GOT it, that they had actually READ the comics and had gotten a sense of the actual character.

Jumping tangents: Given the brouhaha over the relationship between movie and marketing when it comes to WALL*E, I do wonder how parents etc. will react to all the toys and stuff for The Dark Knight, given that the film itself is promising to be very, VERY dark. Though I don't necessarily see any contradiction (or, thus, hypocrisy) between the content of the movie and the content of the merchandise where The Dark Knight is concerned -- the only problem might be if a toy is marketed to, say, 5-year-olds when the film is clearly aimed at PG-13 audiences and has the sensibility of a "Mature Readers" graphic novel. (Was, say, The Killing Joke appropriate for 13-year-olds?)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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-- the only problem might be if a toy is marketed to, say, 5-year-olds when the film is clearly aimed at PG-13 audiences

I can't help but think of Transformers, which is based on a toy line for pre-teens but was "Michael Bay-ified" to include masturbation jokes and a half-dressed Megan Fox bending over to inspect Shia Lebeouf's engine.

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Definitely looking forward to the movie, as a longtime Batman fan. I'm excited about what I've seen of Ledger's performance so far, mostly because most other renditions of the Joker's character on-screen really bother me. They've never seemed to quite capture the sheer evil, insanity and intelligence of the Joker, as in the comics. It's the one villain that has, comic-wise, made Batman (and two Robins) seriously consider murder. I think Dick Grayson even tried once, but my comic reading has been sketchy lately, so I'm not sure.

I'm with Chattaway on the cussing thing. Also, the kids' toy market. Not a huge fan of that. There are few things in life that bother me more than seeing five-year-olds (or younger) sitting in theaters for PG-13 movies that I know are going to be on the darker side of cinema. There are some things that kids just aren't ready to process. It's a serious source of frustration that people take advantage of the "coolness" of something like Batman or the Hulk and market it towards kids, who then expect to see the film. Unfortunately, a lot of parents take little kids to stuff like this without thinking about what it really means to their minds and hearts.

Hm. Anyway. I'm still excited about it. I'm excited about Eckhart's role, Michael Caine as Alfred again, and ... Batman.

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Press screening. Monday the 14th. In IMAX. Hoo boy.

Only four days before the film comes out -- three, if you count the presumably inevitable Thursday-midnight screenings -- but still. I'm stoked.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Peter Travers really REALLY likes this movie. His review mentions a posthumous Oscar for Heath Ledger. Wow! This review will only feed the hype, even though Travers usually seems pretty level-headed.

Rolling Stone review

AP movie writer David Germain also talks about the Oscar worthiness of Ledger's performance...

At times sounding like a cross between tough guy James Cagney in a gangster flick and Philip Seymour Hoffman's fastidious Truman Capote, Ledger elevates Batman's No. 1 nemesis to a place even Jack Nicholson did not take him in 1989's "Batman."

A best-actor Academy Award nominee for "Brokeback Mountain," Ledger has earned fresh Oscar buzz for "The Dark Knight," which could land him in the supporting-actor race.

Full review here.

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

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Peter Travers really REALLY likes this movie. His review mentions a posthumous Oscar for Heath Ledger. Wow! This review will only feed the hype, even though Travers usually seems pretty level-headed.

Rolling Stone review

AP movie writer David Germain also talks about the Oscar worthiness of Ledger's performance...

So does a guy named Sam Rubin from KTLA:

KTLA Blog

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Don't take this the wrong way, because I obviously haven't seen the film yet, but if Heath Ledger was still living, do you think he'd be getting Oscar buzz for this performance? We are, after all, talking about a comic-book movie, no matter how much gravitas Nolan and Co. have brought to the material.

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Don't take this the wrong way, because I obviously haven't seen the film yet, but if Heath Ledger was still living, do you think he'd be getting Oscar buzz for this performance? We are, after all, talking about a comic-book movie, no matter how much gravitas Nolan and Co. have brought to the material.

It wouldn't be a first, getting a nomination posthumously or a nomination for a comic book movie. Peter Finch won posthumously for Network, and Al Pacino got nominated for best supporting actor for Dick Tracy. A great performance is a great performance, and shouldn't be weighted on the basis of the film's genre. Unfortunately, that is not always the case - two performances come to my mind that were completely overlooked by the Academy, probably because of genre-bias. Christopher Walken delivered one of his best performances as Johnny Smith in The Dead Zone. And Jeff Goldblum gave his best performance in The Fly.

Hmmm... it didn't occur to me at the time that both these films are by David Cronenberg. Maybe it was a Cronenberg-bias.

Edited by Baal_T'shuvah

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
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Don't take this the wrong way, because I obviously haven't seen the film yet, but if Heath Ledger was still living, do you think he'd be getting Oscar buzz for this performance? We are, after all, talking about a comic-book movie, no matter how much gravitas Nolan and Co. have brought to the material.

It wouldn't be a first, getting a nomination posthumously or a nomination for a comic book movie. Peter Finch won posthumously for Network, and Al Pacino got nominated for best supporting actor for Dick Tracy. A great performance is a great performance, and shouldn't be weighted on the basis of the film's genre.

Network also was a drama that had multiple nominations. I didn't realize that Pacino was nominated for Dick Tracy, though that was at a time in his career when he could sneeze in a film and get an Oscar nomination for it. Also, I'm not denigrating the fact that it is a comic-book movie; I'm only speaking of how the Academy Awards might view such a performance under ordinary circumstances. If Ledger is as fantastic as the hype, then I would by all means like to see him get a nomination.

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