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It sent shivers up me spine when I saw it in front of Cloverfield, and it still does.

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The Young Kirks: Actors Cast To Play Young Jim and George Kirk

It has already been reported that the new Star Trek movie will feature a young/adolescent Spock in addition to the two adult Spocks (Quinto and Nimoy). But it appears the movie will also feature a young James T. Kirk, as well as a young version of his older brother. TrekMovie.com has learned that George Samuel Kirk, Jr. will be played by 15-year-old actor Spencer Daniels, while ComingSoon.net is reporting that the younger James T. Kirk will be played by (almost) 12 year-old actor Jimmy Bennett.

TrekMovie.com, January 29

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I'm kind of impressed, actually, that they've remembered that Kirk had a brother. William Shatner seemed to have forgotten that fact when he co-wrote and directed ST5:TFF. There is a scene near the end, after Spock's long-lost half-brother Sybok has died, where Kirk says to Spock and McCoy, "I lost a brother once. I was lucky. I got him back." So when Kirk refers to his "brother" there, he is referring to the death and resurrection of Spock in ST2:TWOK and ST3:TSFS. Peter David, in his comic-book adaptation of ST5:TFF, revised this bit of dialogue so that Kirk -- standing in front of a window that seems to reflect his brother Sam's face back at him -- now said something like, "I've lost two brothers. I was lucky. I got one of them back."

I guess the question NOW is whether any of the Spock-related flashback material in ST5:TFF will take Spock's half-brother Sybok into account!

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J.J. Abrams has said: "It won't suffer from the problem that traditional prequels suffer from:

that you know all the characters will live

." I assume this is simply a reference to the branching timelines -- in other words, once you start off on a new timeline, you no longer need to ensure that continuity is maintained for any of the other timelines -- but who knows...?

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'Star Trek' pushed back to 2009

Paramount is pushing back the release of J.J. Abrams' "Star Trek" from Dec. 25 to May 8, 2009, saying the pic's gross potential is greater as a summer tentpole.

Move was part of a major reshuffling to the studio's release calendar, as well as to DreamWorks' release sked. . . .

Like Par, many of the majors are likely to revisit their release skeds in the wake of the writers' strike as they try to balance out their 2008 and 2009 calendars.

"Star Trek" has no competition in its new slot -- at least not so far, although it opens one week after 20th Century Fox bows "X-Men Origins: Wolverine" and one week before Sony is slated to bow sequel "Angels and Demons." . . .

Variety, February 13

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'Star Trek' pushed back to 2009

Paramount is pushing back the release of J.J. Abrams' "Star Trek" from Dec. 25 to May 8, 2009, saying the pic's gross potential is greater as a summer tentpole.

Move was part of a major reshuffling to the studio's release calendar, as well as to DreamWorks' release sked. . . .

Like Par, many of the majors are likely to revisit their release skeds in the wake of the writers' strike as they try to balance out their 2008 and 2009 calendars.

"Star Trek" has no competition in its new slot -- at least not so far, although it opens one week after 20th Century Fox bows "X-Men Origins: Wolverine" and one week before Sony is slated to bow sequel "Angels and Demons." . . .

Variety, February 13

Noooooooooooooo!

I have to wait for four-plus months LONGER to see this film? Augh!

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This is disappointing. All the same, I can see the point; Star Trek feels more like a summer franchise than a winter one--to me, anyway.

Edited by NBooth

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NBooth wrote:

: This is disappointing. All the same, I can see the point; Star Trek feels more like a summer franchise than a winter one--to me, anyway.

That's interesting, because only three of the ten movies to date have come out in the summer. And one of them, ST5:TFF, was the second-biggest flop in the franchise to date. And the top-grossing film in the entire franchise was released at Thanksgiving 1986 (I remember going to see it the second or third or fourth time with my cousins after a Christmas family gathering). And for what it's worth, the second-highest grossing film -- before adjusting for inflation -- was released at Thanksgiving 1996.

  • Star Trek: The Motion Picture -- Dec 7, 1979
  • Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan -- June 4, 1982
  • Star Trek III: The Search for Spock -- June 1, 1984
  • Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home -- November 26, 1986
  • Star Trek V: The Final Frontier -- June 9, 1989
  • Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country -- December 6, 1991
  • Star Trek: Generations -- November 18, 1994
  • Star Trek: First Contact -- November 22, 1996
  • Star Trek: Insurrection -- December 11, 1998
  • Star Trek: Nemesis -- December 13, 2002
Incidentally, by the time J.J. Abrams' film comes out, it will have been almost six-and-a-half years since the last Star Trek movie. The biggest gap before that was the four years between ST:I and ST:N. And the biggest gap before THAT was the almost three years between ST6:TUC and ST:G -- between the two generations, as it were. All the other films have come out at intervals of two or two-and-a-half years.

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I remember coming out from seeing The Wrath of Khan at the small theater in the town where we lived (Country Cinemas in Watertown, CT) with tears in my eyes (spoiler: Because

Spock dies

) into the warm night air, and the group from my church that went together deciding to have a milkshake at the greasy spoon restaurant next door. It was the only time I ever went to that joint, but the shakes were good, and they sort of made up for the sorrow in my stomach. I was just younger than ten years old, and from that moment on, TWOK was my favorite movie of all time.

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NBooth wrote:

: This is disappointing. All the same, I can see the point; Star Trek feels more like a summer franchise than a winter one--to me, anyway.

That's interesting, because only three of the ten movies to date have come out in the summer.

[sigh] that's what I get for commenting from the gut, without consulting IMDB first. Ah, well, at least I gave Peter a chance to do his thing. :) .

Incidentally, will be the first Star Trek film I bother to see in theaters--the last one came out when I was fifteen, and I wasn't much into newer movies.

Edited by NBooth

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[sigh] that's what I get for commenting from the gut, without consulting IMDB first. Ah, well, at least I gave Peter a chance to do his thing. :) .

Tee hee!

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I remember coming out from seeing The Wrath of Khan at the small theater in the town where we lived (Country Cinemas in Watertown, CT) with tears in my eyes (spoiler: Because

Spock dies

) into the warm night air, and the group from my church that went together deciding to have a milkshake at the greasy spoon restaurant next door. It was the only time I ever went to that joint, but the shakes were good, and they sort of made up for the sorrow in my stomach. I was just younger than ten years old, and from that moment on, TWOK was my favorite movie of all time.

That's funny--this is one of the first movies I remember seeing (Bambi and ESB only come before it--edit, oh and Raiders! My parents had a high tolerance for letting their kids see violence). I was in Connecticut, and after the torpedo tube landed on the Genesis planet, my seven year old mind came up with, "I guess Vulcans never die".

Edited by Buckeye Jones

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NBooth wrote:

: [sigh] that's what I get for commenting from the gut, without consulting IMDB first. Ah, well, at least I gave Peter a chance to do his thing. :) .

Where would my bonnet be without your bees? :)

But seriously, as one who grew up with the franchise -- indeed, as one who can almost mark the stages of my life by which Star Trek movie was in theatres at the time -- your comment just kind of caught my eye, because I have generally associated the Star Trek movies with the winter season, or with the pre-winter season (since technically winter doesn't begin until the solstica c. December 21, and seven of the films came out between mid-November and mid-December, BEFORE the solstice). I have tended to associate those films with Christmas gatherings, with dark nights outside the theatre (rather than the long, bright nights one gets during the summer), and with the TV shows dropping big hints about the upcoming movies (which would not be possible during the summer, when the TV shows are on hiatus), etc.

But, um, there I go, doing my "thing" again. Oops.

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Meet Little Spock

In early January Leonard Nimoy revealed that the new Star Trek movie will not only have two Spocks (himself and Zachary Quinto), but three Spocks. TrekMovie.com has identified this third Spock as twelve-year-old actor Jacob Kogan, who will be appearing as the adolescent version of our favorite half-human half-Vulcan. As a child actor, Kogan has few credits to his name, but he did feature in the title role of the 2007 horror film Joshua, starring Sam Rockwell. . . .

TrekMovie.com, February 27

- - -

This is Kogan, followed by the two previous versions of Young Spock that we have seen (in 1984's ST3:TSFS and a 1973 episode of the animated series):

kogan1.jpgyoungspock1.jpgyoungspock2.jpg

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Yeah I saw those spy photos yesterday. My reaction was - not bad, not stellar, could go either way. They look Trek-ish to me, but I have to see them under studio lighting, in action, in service to a script to really judge the design of the film.

And of course, the key thing is - how does the Enterprise look, exterior and interior? That's the key piece of design, and everything will rise and fall on the big E.

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Yeah! I turned the poster and all four quadrants individually into "Pieces of Flair" on facebook. VERY cool!

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For those who like to speculate about how much monkeying with alternate realities this movie will do, note how Quinto answers, around the 3:25 mark, when he is asked how his performance as the young Spock was informed by his knowledge of what the character would become in the existing TV shows and movies:

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