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M. Leary

Gregory's posts about Lynchian themes, the hobo, etc.

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How timely that, in the midst of this discussion,

THIS news story would be posted.

David Lynch wants to save the world. Apparently, whatever you might think the bum in Mulholland Drive represents, Lynch is more interested in "yogic flying" and transcendental meditation than he is in Christ.

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And the Eucharist may be the perfect example of a 'blank canvas' where God can somehow show the fullness of his holiness or humility. It may be the perfect 'screen' on which to project the perfect 'movie'.  I think the bum is also this perfect canvas/screen. Everything essential to Christ and his mission seems to be there.

First reaction: Huh?

Second reaction: Huh?

Third reaction: First you say the bum is a canvas/screen onto which something (the image of Christ?) is being "projected" by someone (you?). In the very next sentence you contradict yourself -- you say "everything essential to Christ and his mission" seems to be there. Dude, if it's being projected, it's not already there and vice versa. "Projected" means you are reading something into the film that the director did not intentionally put there.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but the bum is a guy in the film who wanders out from behind a dumpster in an alley and frightens people a couple of times. How does that embody "everything essential to Christ and his mission"? Give me specifics.

I'm beginning to be reminded of people who travel hundreds of miles to see the face of Jesus in a pancake. Whether they're projecting the image, or whether it actually seems to be there, I would still argue that it has no intrinsic significance.

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I was wondering whether there is anything more like a piece of bread than a hobo?

Wow. Okay. This thread has just officially become too surreal for me. It's been a long strange trip.

In my experience of Christ figures in art, I've never seen anything to suggest to me that the bum in Mulholland Drive qualifies. We see too little of him. His function in the film is too small. Lynch structures those brief appearances with quite a bit to make us respond to him with fear and dread. He might be supernatural, indeed, but I get from him the same sense of darkness that I get from a lot of the demonic figures of Twin Peaks. I do not see any love in the MH bum. I do not see any tenderness or attempt to communicate. I won't say it's impossible, because I believe God can speak to someone through whatever he chooses, but I do not think seeing the bum there as Christ opens up the rest of the film or contributes to our understanding of the larger picture. Some interpretations are rewarding, others are fruitless cases of "reading into" something, and for me, at least, seeing the bum as Christ feels like a serious case of "reading into" something... loading it with our own concocted meaning for which there is not enough evidence.

For that matter, the Cowboy could be Christ. At least he serves a function in the movie of offering some kind of caution to our heroine, some kind of help. But I don't think there's anything to suggest he is Christ... nothing beyond his role of concern and care.

I'm certainly not saying Lynch's films are meaningless. I just don't see THIS meaning in it.

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How timely that, in the midst of this discussion,

THIS news story would be posted.

David Lynch wants to save the world. Apparently, whatever you might think the bum in Mulholland Drive represents, Lynch is more interested in "yogic flying" and transcendental meditation than he is in Christ.

from the article:

"...Eraserhead, the dystopian vision of the future that ends with it's protagonist's head being ground into erasers."

The movie doesn't end this way. It ends with it's protagonist embracing heavenly creativity. If David Lynch has brought us Christ in MD, why should we focus on anything else?

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David Lynch accepts the anger and injustices and suspicion that comes his way with joy and peace, just like the bum. So maybe we are not recognizing the face of Christ Our Lord? Has Lynch been the instrument that has 'incarnated Christ into cinema'? Could it have been done through a 'believer'? If he has, what would his personal life matter? And who can say whether silence itself may not now be the most appropriate prayer? How can a simple question like "Where is Christ NOT in Mulholland Drive?" not have an answer?

Gregory, i'm all about Lynch, especially Eraserhead. I wore Henry as an avatar on these boards for several years, and there are times that i miss him, but still other times when i believe i've outgrown that stage.

I'm all about searching for meaning in Lynch's films. I've sat in crowded college parties and debated Eraserhead's mysteries for midnight hours on end. Maybe there is meaning, maybe there's not. More than likely it doesn't matter. We're talking about an artist who erects wall-sized paintings and then puts very real maggots with raw meat on the painting just to "keep it moving and alive." The weirdness of what he's doing far surpasses any valid point he's trying to make, and he deserves to be looked at in that light.

Your constant posting on this issue is now putting you in this kind of light as well. You are to Lynch what Aronofsky's Max was to Pi. If you seek out a particular number, you're going to find it everywhere. In the search to unlock the secrets that crack a code, in defying madness you instead become the mad, cracked code.

Sol says in Pi (i looked it up just for fun): "You want to find the number 216, you can find it anywhere. 216 steps from the street corner to your front door, 216 seconds you spend riding on the elevator... When your mind becomes obsessed with anything, you will filter everything else out and find that thing everywhere."

You're looking for order in the extremely complex and chaotic universe of one man's mind. What you are becoming is a person who sits in the garage telling the whole world he's a car, but it doesn't make him one.

-s.

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I appreciate the kindness of a response. I x'd out my posts here, including the one you quoted ( before I could get to it ). Perhaps it's possible to look at the responses to my posts and this would reveal more of what is happening or has happened? How I would have loved to continue discussing Lynch's works with you! I respect that you don't feel that this is a productive thing to do anymore. I was never afraid of the hatred that might come my way. I chose to post what I thought was right. The Father will tell us one day if it was right. I will try to prepare myself for whatever he might say.

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From one Lynch fan to the next, there is absolutely no hatred coming your way. I don't think that was implied in my post and i still feel that everything i said was applicable to this conversation. I just feel that you're reaching, and i feel that you're wrong.

-s.

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And for what it's worth, have you been on any other threads besides the Lynch-related ones? I think that a working knowledge of the artform in general would be crucial to understanding the artist, as much as i believe that a look at all of the works of an artist in context are better than narrowly focusing on one particular piece of the artist's puzzle.

-s.

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Gregory, looking back through the posts I see no evidence of hatred. I simply see that people are interpreting Lynch quite differently than you. There's nothing inherently wrong with interpreting things differently. But when you have made your point and others do not agree, to go on and on and onmaking your point ad nauseum will basically generate more than just disagreement, but eventually people will start ignoring it. As you have not been participtaing in conversations on any other subject, it makes you SEEM strangely preoccupied with one topic, and that too can be off-putting. To then decide that those who have QUESTIONED your opinion are responding with HATRED really throws your judgment into question. I'm not saying you've done anything terribly wrong, I'm just explaining how you might find more productive conversations on the board.

Until then, I am going to close this topic. I think the question of whether the hobo in Mulholland Drive represents Christ has been more than exhausted in this thread.

(By request of one of our regulars, the thread will be kept in the archive, not deleted.)

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