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Peter T Chattaway

Narnia: Pre-release discussion of LWW

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Interesting range of topics, especially #1. Will these papers be generally available after the conference? (By-the-bye, I've never heard of Glass Hammers; are they any good?)

Incidentally, here is a closer look at the art from the inside of the display stand. (I don't think a full view has been posted yet.)

Sorry--I'm not involved with the conference at all, just passing on the information. I've never heard of Glass Hammer either.

Weirdly, the announcement doesn't include any contact info. But the English dept. would be a good bet. Belmont University website.


There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

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More pictures; nothing earth-shattering, just a shot of the minotaur, and a bit of the White Witch's castle. The screencaps are fromDisney Movie Surfers, if anyone wants to see the clip--but from what I hear it's just a few seconds, and comes late in the program (at the end of the 4:00 mark.)

Edited by NBooth

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Dig the art of the kids meeting Aslan. Whoa!


In case you were wondering, my name is spelled "Denes House," but it's pronounced "Throatwobbler Mangrove."

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Dig the art of the kids meeting Aslan. Whoa!

Oh, yes; that and the battle are amazing (the other's o.k.--except we've seen the lantern waste.) Although that rock must be pretty uncomfortable....

So far I'm liking the look of the film, at least, as seen in concept-art et cetera. The Weta clip had me a bit worried, but not majorly. (And I think I'm repeating myself, so I'll stop. blush.gif )

Edited by NBooth

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Dunno if I'm repeating what has already been said here, but that rendition of LWW's battle scene has me worried that this will be a way-too-big focus of the film, distracting from the power of the book's quieter scenes.


To be an artist is never to avert one's eyes.
- Akira Kurosawa

http://secularcinephile.blogspot.com

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Well, as we're reading from the LotR book of film-making, the battles are very obviously going to be exagerrated from their written form. (Notice how the first production footage we have from the film is focussed on WETA's creatures and armour etc.) But I'm really pleased with the Aslan image, too. The best concept work I've seen from this film so far.

Phil.


"We live as if the world were as it should be, to show it what it can be." - Angel

"We don't do perms!" - Trevor and Simon

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Well, it's in the nature of film adaptations of books to exaggerate some elements and, um, un-exaggerate others. In his intro to the Watership Down movie picture book, Richard Adams points out that an episode involving a chapel (I think?) full of rats took up only a sentence or two in the novel, but was given a full minute or three of screen time in the film, whereas the episode involving Cowslip and his Huxleyan warren stretched out over several days in the book but took only a few minutes in the film -- and that's fine.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Interviews:

Swinton and Ernie Malik (publicist)

Mark Johnson

Both at JoBlo. Mild profanity in the Swinton interview; havn't read Johnson, yet.

For completeness: the summary at NarniaWeb

Looks interesting. (I've been skimming the Johnson interview, and it's pre-Brian Cox.)

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NBooth wrote:

: Mild profanity in the Swinton interview . . .

Really? I didn't spot any. Unless you mean that one word in the opening paragraph, which is on par with the mild profanities that Lewis used in the Narnia books themselves.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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"I feel a nostalgia for an age yet to come..."
Opus, Twitter, Facebook

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Went to an event yesterday on the Disney lot in Burbank, designed to introduce the film to "faith groups." (It wasn't really a media event.)

A nice line-up of people involved in the film were present, including Andrew Adamson.

Not sure how much I'm able to say right now, but I'm working on an article for World this week that will cover some specifics of the event.

I will say, though, that my expectations for the project were raised considerably by the event. The best intentions don't always produce a great film, but things are looking good so far.

-Andrew

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Call for Papers: "'Past Watchful Dragons': Fantasy and Faith in the World of C. S. Lewis" Conference to be held November 3-5, 2005 on the campus of Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee.

Official conference information at the Belmont University site. Deadline for proposals: May 1, 2005.


There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

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In case you haven't seen, an article in World on Walden Media's involvement of TLTW&TW. It also talks a bit about the marketing strategy:

http://www.worldmag.com/displayarticle.cfm?id=10307

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More concept art: Cair Paravel. Honestly, it doesn't look much like a cair--something vaguely middle-eastern about it, from what I can see. But cool-looking.

I thought Cair / Caer was just a Celtic word for home? Or is that your point -- Middle Eastern rather than Celtic or more broadly European?

Having squinted at the painting several times now, my considered opinion, as this board's resident fantasy architecture / cityscape nut, is that Cair Paravel as depicted in this painting is too darn far away for me to have anything to say about it.

I do hope thay are taking Pauline Baynes's illustrations as some kind of reference point.


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Thank you. It's nice to be appreciated.

(Law school professor to graduating class: "Three years ago, when asked a legal question, you could answer, in all honesty, 'I don't know.' Now you can say, with great authority, 'It depends.'")


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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I thought Cair / Caer was just a Celtic word for home? Or is that your point -- Middle Eastern rather than Celtic or more broadly European?

Having squinted at the painting several times now, my considered opinion, as this board's resident fantasy architecture / cityscape nut, is that Cair Paravel as depicted in this painting is too darn far away for me to have anything to say about it.

I do hope thay are taking Pauline Baynes's illustrations as some kind of reference point.

"Cair" probably is derived from "caer," which is a Celtic word for "castle" or "fort," so we would like to see a castle, not just a house, even a grand house.

I think all of us who grew up with Pauline Baynes' illustrations think of them as definitive, and her castle is pretty much the pointy, Euro-gothic-fairy-tale-Ludwig's-folly thing...

They'll have to deal with some kind of cultural architectural differences, eventually, if they get to THE HORSE AND HIS BOY. Won't that be a can of worms? Or will it? I hope not.


There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

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Yeah, The Horse and His Boy will be a thorny one given the current climate.

Recently with the LOTR movies, the old debate about whether Tolkien was being racist cropped up. In the case of Narnia, it is even more obvious. Lewis very clearly intended the Calormenes to be Muslims. As I read the description of Calormene architecture, especially in TH&HB, it is very obviously Arabian/Persian. Even the description of the political system of the Tisroc sounds a lot like certain Muslim nations.

That having been said, I hope they do TH&HB. It is definitely one of my favorite books in the series.

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