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Hugues

JAZZ

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To answer everybody at once, I'm glad I asked! :)

So: I purchased that Sarah Vaughan with Clifford Brown CD, the 2000 Verve reissue you posted the image above.

I'll buy that Getz/Gilberto CD, and will read about Gershwin to see if I'm interested. I just know his big classics, you know, like everybody. ;)

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Let us know what you think of all the new music, Hugues. Enjoy!

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Let us know what you think of all the new music, Hugues. Enjoy!

I'll gladly share my impressions! Today I made some search for "corner stone" records, reading a dictionary of jazz I have (Le Jazz dans tous ses

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Having mentioned BBC Radio Three's weekly Jazz Recods Request a day or two ago, it was great to hear the great Dutch conductor Bernard Haitink say on Radio 3 this morning that whenever he's in the UK he always makes a point of listening to it as it has been such a great source of pleasure to him over the years.

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Haven

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Dave Brubeck Quartet : Time Out (1959)

Ornette Coleman : The Shape of Jazz to Come (1959)

Bill Evans : Sunday Evening at the Village Vanguard (1961)

Albert Ayler : Spiritual Unity (1964) or Live in Greenwich Village : The Complete Impulse Sessions (1965-1967)

Eric Dolphy : Out to Lunch (1964)

Archie Shepp : Four for Trane (1964)

Wayne Shorter : Speak No Evil (1964)

Herbie Hancock : Maiden Voyage (1965)

Pharoah Sanders : Karma (1969)

Mahavishnu Orchestra : The Inner Mounting Flame (1971)

Weather Report : Weather Report (1971)

Chick Corea : Return to Forever (1972)

Keith Jarrett : The K

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I find that I admire this music more in theory than in reality, and that a little bit goes a long way.

I didn't want to scare Hugues off, but yeah, I agree. Dolphy's "Out to Lunch" was a real doozy for me the first time I listened to it (and I'd bought the CD without ever hearing anything off it). I've since warmed to it, but given the choice, I'll almost always pull out Evans' Sunday at the Village Vanguard, or any of the other Evans titles in my collection, before I pull out the Dolphy.

There are exceptions to this, but those are exceptions, not the general rule.

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Get back to us next year and let us know how it's comin'. :lol:

Louis Armstrong : The Best of the Hot Five & Seven Recordings (1926-1928)
If you were forced to scratch everything else off the list and keep just one, this would be your best bet. It dont get anymore essential than this IMO.

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Dave Brubeck Quartet : Time Out (1959)

Ornette Coleman : The Shape of Jazz to Come (1959)

Bill Evans : Sunday Evening at the Village Vanguard (1961)

Albert Ayler : Spiritual Unity (1964) or Live in Greenwich Village : The Complete Impulse Sessions (1965-1967)

Eric Dolphy : Out to Lunch (1964)

Archie Shepp : Four for Trane (1964)

Wayne Shorter : Speak No Evil (1964)

Herbie Hancock : Maiden Voyage (1965)

Pharoah Sanders : Karma (1969)

Mahavishnu Orchestra : The Inner Mounting Flame (1971)

Weather Report : Weather Report (1971)

Chick Corea : Return to Forever (1972)

Keith Jarrett : The K

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You betcha, Charlie Parker is something to hear. You bought Anita O'Day on a hunch? Good hunch. She had a uniquely swaggering confidence in her voice and technique. One of the coolest singers ever.

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But if I may make a suggestion: try some European artists! So many of my favorites are from outside the US - and France has historically had a great jazz scene.

The first that comes to my mind is Django Reinhardt. Funnily enough (since I'm French), I don't know more European music than the American one. The fact is the music that does nurse me comes from the records I buy, so that doesn't have to do with the part of the world I live. Now that doesn't explain why I'm more interested in US music than European one - probably a matter of roots? I mean: jazz and blues and country started in America.

My essential French songs culture remains Jacques Brel, L

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I've read a so bad review of that Dave Brubeck Quartet's Time Out on amazon.fr that I remain baffled, since it sounds like a big classic from most critics and reviewers. I was wondering what the specialists of this board think of this album? Is it indispensible or overrated? Is there a controverse about it?

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I've read a so bad review of that Dave Brubeck Quartet's Time Out on amazon.fr that I remain baffled, since it sounds like a big classic from most critics and reviewers. I was wondering what the specialists of this board think of this album? Is it indispensible or overrated? Is there a controverse about it?

I'd say that album is indispensable. The only criticism I've ever read of Brubeck is that his particular flavor of "cool" jazz lacks some of the fire and swing of the post-bop music that was in vogue at the same time. And while that's probably true, it's also irrelevant. Brubeck was after something different, and the tricky time signatures he employed and the almost telepathic interplay he had with his band, particularly saxophonist Paul Desmond, make Time Out a jazz classic. Brubeck is also a remarkable composer, and pieces such as "Take Five" and "Blue Rondo a la Turk" are deservedly studied as classics of the genre. I don't think you went wrong at all with that purchase, Hugues.

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Andy mentioned the "tricky time signatures" for which the CD is known. I don't entirely understand that area of music, but the two tracks he mentions are the two best on the CD, and are worth the price of the disc on their own.

The fact that Brubeck continues to make music and tour to rapturous responses across Europe also makes him a rarity: A seminal jazz artist who's still alive.

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There's no one snootier than the jazz critic. Some nerds back in the day considered Brubeck "lite" at best and inauthentic at worst. I think the general consensus has changed and most critics and musicians hail his early stuff.

The guy is/was a genius and one of the finest jazz composers ever IMO. He had a penchant for writing odd-metered songs that sounded completely effortless and natural . His classic Take Five, for example, is written in 5/4, which is a not a traditonal jazz time signature and one that is pretty challenging to write in. Blue Rondo has sections in 9/8 as I recall and Unsquare Dance has gotta a very tricky thing in 7/4. Now, every music theory student under the sun has experimented with these meters, but Brubeck did it with it unforgettable riffs and melodies. That was the difference. My kids, who are not musically trained, can all hum along with the bass line of Unsquare Dance-- and believe me 7/4 is a bitch! That's part of the beauty of Brubecks music.

And as an incredible bonus you get Paul Desmond's understated alto, which was a magnificent thing of beauty.

Edited by coltrane

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Umm... Paul Desmond (alto sax player with Dave B.) wrote Take Five ;)

This is true. However, i recall reading somewhere years ago that Brubeck was the one who actually introduced the famous 5/4 bass line first and that Desmond wrote the melody off of that. Regardless, Desmond was indeed the man.

RE: "odd" time signatures-- Most of the time when i hear them in jazz, fusion, rock or whatever, the results sound contrived. It's the 'ol "Look at me everyone while I switch into this weird meter with mathematical precision!". The challenge for any composer/performer, of course, is to play those less common meters in a very natural manner so that the listener is not distracted. Phish's "Split Open and Melt" morphs from a pretty standard 4/4 groove right into a 13/8 trance-like jam without batting an eye... and the average listener would never know. It so fluid. That's an art.

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Just to let you know that I've received everything I ordered (and I have ordered more, too, and I even started a blues collection, as well), and am digging it. ;)

I'm going at it chronologically, and loved what I've heard so far (Armstrong, Ellington).

Meanwhile, we've received a promo of one Patricia Barber's Mythologies at the local radio (where I work as a DJ), I have listened, and found it was mostly a bore. Then I went to AMG (a kind of Bible, you know... to me anyway), and read a review written by... guess? :D

Given the fact I take Mr Jurek in high esteem, I think I still have a long way to go to enjoy contemporary jazz music.

Now, I return to my classics.

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I haven't read Thom's love for Patricia Barber, but when I first heard her several years ago, my reaction was the same as yours, Hugues. Maybe I need to give her another listen.

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Starting with old jazz made me start with old blues too, I'm currently crossing the 20's: Mamie Smith, Bessie Smith, Lonnie Johnson... they call it blues, but it's jazz as much, and music hall too (for the first too). Louis Armstrong played with Bessie Smith, Coleman Hawkins played with Mamie Smith.

Lonnie Johnson, he's been like paving the way for Django Reinhardt as early as 1927. His father was a New Orleans musician. He learned to play violin before he take the guitar, and that's why he had a way to play the guitar differently than most other bluesmen of his age.

and of course, listening to 20's music is something special, in the sound department - :D

It makes you hear another world, it's dizzy trip in the past. Almost 100 years ago...

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So far I've listened to Louis Armstrong's Best of Hot Five & Hot Seven Recordings (5 times or so), and I really love it, it's the best recording I have from the 20's. It's an absolute masterpiece, and that's not a scoop I guess. :)

I now started Coleman Hawkins' Body & Soul (complete Victor recordings) and it's a delight, too. I love the sound of tenor sax.

Edited by Hugues

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Hugues: Great choices. For some reason, I don't own either of those recordings -- an embarrassing admission.

Thom: Brushing up on Kurt Elling, I see that your bio of the singer hails Elling's "Flirting With Twilight" as "his most ambitious and satisfying recording." But on the discography, "Flirting" gets the lowest marks of all of Elling's recordings.

Which leads to a question you've probably addressed elsewhere, so forgive me for asking again: Why do the album ratings not match the bio description? Is this unusual at All Music, or par for the course? I'm guessing that the ratings are a compilation of critical input, while the bio is one writer's opinion.

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This thread rocks!

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So far I've listened to Louis Armstrong's Best of Hot Five & Hot Seven Recordings (5 times or so), and I really love it, it's the best recording I have from the 20's. It's an absolute masterpiece, and that's not a scoop I guess. :)

Fantastic! I went through a phase about six years ago, when it was virtually the only thing i listened to for a loooong time.

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Which leads to a question you've probably addressed elsewhere, so forgive me for asking again: Why do the album ratings not match the bio description? Is this unusual at All Music, or par for the course? I'm guessing that the ratings are a compilation of critical input, while the bio is one writer's opinion.

I'm not Thom, but the ratings are based on one reviewer's take on a particular album. The biography is one reviewer's history of a performer/band. Usually the reviewers and the biographers are different people. Although the biography is, in theory, a strictly objective summary of a performer's/group's history, it's difficult to avoid critical commentary altogether. So you may occasionally see critical discrepancies when you compare the two.

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