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Time.com posts its list by decade.

Surprises?

Does any care?

Isn't this the third or fourth Time magazine-related "best of" list that I've posted here? I've got deja vu.

I always enjoy these lists, but they depress me. By decade, here are the Top 100 titles I own, or once owned:

1950s

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Time.com posts its list by decade.

Surprises?

Does any care?

No great surprises. I care. But I like lists. This the 33rd best Top 100 Albums list I've ever seen.

The only real puzzle for me is why four of the nine albums selected from this decade are compilations from old/dead artists. Nothing against Sam Cooke, Elvis Presley, Muddy Waters, or Hank Williams, but why are they on a list of albums from this millenium? When combined with the rap artists who also appear in the oughties list (Kanye, Eminem, Outkast), that only leaves room for 2 new non-rap albums from this decade (P.J. Harvey and Radiohead). That seems wrong to me, but off the top of my head I don't know which new(er) albums would replace them.

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The only real puzzle for me is why four of the nine albums selected from this decade are compilations from old/dead artists. Nothing against Sam Cooke, Elvis Presley, Muddy Waters, or Hank Williams, but why are they on a list of albums from this millenium? When combined with the rap artists who also appear in the oughties list (Kanye, Eminem, Outkast), that only leaves room for 2 new non-rap albums from this decade (P.J. Harvey and Radiohead). That seems wrong to me, but off the top of my head I don't know which new(er) albums would replace them.

Seems wrong to me too. I for one don't really consider compilations "albums" in the technical sense. I would have disqualified compilations.

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Might it have something to do with this decade not yet being anywhere near complete, so that Time relied heavily on compilations from artists whose recording careers are pretty much wrapped up? This is just a guess.

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Well, for starters they missed Second Hand by Mark Heard...

Seriously, it's a tame list, but what would you expect from Time? It does, I think, do a pretty good job of generally listing the most influential and lasting popular albums from it's respective decades, but like all such lists it's flawed. Nothing before the 50s would make the top 100? And the inclusion of those compilation albums is a bit of a mystery. Surely something from the current indie-rock/emo scene could have been included.

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Hole made the list. Hole? As in Courtney Love is a total loon made the list. Oasis? If anyone would argue for the inclusion of Oasis on this list, it would be me. I was crazy for them in the 90's. But top 100 album of all time? Nah. They didn't even pick their best album.

And yes, the inclusion of comps are a bit weird.

It's hard to evaluate albums from the current decade for this type of thing. It's time that has allowed for the inclusion of albums by artists such as the Clash and the Sex Pistols. I think it will take awhile to figure out those albums for the 00's. I realize others will argue, but the only populist album that might be worthy (of the top of my head) is Wilco's Yankee Hotel Foxtrot. It has the songs and the backstory - a winning combination for remaining in collective memory.

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It is a puzzling list. I'd rather see Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane at Carnegie on the list. At least it was unreleased material.

I would also choose Yankee Hotel Foxtrot. I would rather see Missy Elliot on the list than Marshall Mathers.

It is rolling into list season though and it is always interesting and thought provoking to see who ends up on what lists.

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The only real puzzle for me is why four of the nine albums selected from this decade are compilations from old/dead artists. Nothing against Sam Cooke, Elvis Presley, Muddy Waters, or Hank Williams, but why are they on a list of albums from this millenium? When combined with the rap artists who also appear in the oughties list (Kanye, Eminem, Outkast), that only leaves room for 2 new non-rap albums from this decade (P.J. Harvey and Radiohead). That seems wrong to me, but off the top of my head I don't know which new(er) albums would replace them.

Setting my indie predilections aside as much as I can, these are the omissions I would have to re-think if I were redoing the list:

first a question: does anyone listen to P.J. Harvey?? I don't know of anyone that listens to her regularly.

2000s

I think Sufjan NEEDS to be here. Illinois OR Michigan

Moby - Play ?

White Stripes ??

90s

Marc Cohn - Marc Cohn ?

80s

Peter Gabriel - Us: Gabriel is one of the ONLY artists from the 80s I still listen to without chuckling (U2, Paul Simon and REM fit that bill too)

70s

Nick Drake - Pink Moon !! - this is probably the most glaring omission in my opinion.

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I forgot these for the 90s:

Counting Crows - August and Everything After

Tracy Chapman - Tracy Chapman ??

Oh, and Beck. Somewhere. I would pick Seachange for the 00's but Odelay in the 90s might be the more popular pick.

Edited by yank_eh

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first a question: does anyone listen to P.J. Harvey?? I don't know of anyone that listens to her regularly.

This made me chuckle because I had gone for a long time with only casual listens to PJ. I was at some friends a week ago and Uh Huh Her, was the ambient music..........The Peel sessions just came out....

This past week, the heavy iPod rotation playlist(which should be called "dark and twisty") includes selections from:

6 PJ Harvey cd's

2 Nico

4 Marianne Faithfull

2 Cat Power

Beach House

I'm not sure which came first, now that I think about it, my dark mood or the playlist..........

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Gabriel is one of the ONLY artists from the 80s I still listen to without chuckling (U2, Paul Simon and REM fit that bill too)

I hate 80s phobia. There's just as much cool 80's stuff as any other decade. Try:

Kate Bush - The Dreaming, The Hounds Of Love

Elvis Costello - Imperial Bedroom

The Cure - Faith, Disintegration

Husker Du - Zen Arcade, New Day Rising, Flip Your Wig

Joy Divison - Closer

The Jam - Sound Affects

The Pixies - Doolittle

The Replacements - Let It Be, Tim, Pleased To Meet Me

Bruce Springsteen - Nebraska

Talking Heads - Remain In Light, Speaking In Tongues, Stop Making Sense

Talk Talk - The Colour Of Spring, Spirit Of Eden

Tom Waits - Swordfishtrombones, Rain Dogs, Frank's Wild Years

XTC - Skylarking

A couple of these albums are a little dated (Cure, Kate Bush) but most hold up pretty well.

PS. Us is from 1992. I think you mean So.

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I actually think the list is fairly representative of the best and most important (as measured by both popular and critical acclaim) music from the past fifty years. Why only 50 years? I don't know. Everybody has their favorites that didn't make the list. That's the way these things work when you only have 100 slots to fill.

Take a look at who's not on the list: Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Billie Holiday, Pink Floyd, Thelonious Monk, B.B. King, Charlie Parker, R.E.M., Howlin' Wolf, Eric Clapton, Bill Monroe, and the Carter Family, for starters. It's a little hard to whine about Television and Counting Crows, in my opinion.

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Oh, incidentally: what does it mean that of the "100 best albums of all time", all are from north america or western europe?

I find it extremely hard to believe that the continents of Africa, South America, Australia, and Asia never produced an album better than "Ropin' The Wind" or "Songs For Swingin' Lovers".

Edited by Holy Moly!

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Take a look at who's not on the list: ... R.E.M., ....

Actually, REM is on it twice. Out of Time in the 90s and Document in the 80s.

Anyone else out there think that Automatic for the People is their best album?

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Oh, incidentally: what does it mean that of the "100 best albums of all time", all are from north america or western europe?

I think it means that Time Magazine is purchased by English-speaking readers who probably aren't all that familiar with Fela Kuti and Thomas Mapfumo. What do you expect them to do?

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This the 33rd best Top 100 Albums list I've ever seen.

I disagree. Andy, how can you say that? It is nowhere near the 33rd best Top 100 Albums list. I wouldn't even put it in the top 40.

I agree that putting all of the compilations in the 00s is lame. I agree that Yankee Hotel Foxtrot is a good choice there. It is hard to make this call early, but I think Arcade Fire, Funeral is a good choice for a very recent album.

I agree that Beck should be present, and that Odelay is probably the best choice.

I agree with yank_eh that Automatic for the People is great, and would have put it in over Out of Time (though I also like Out of Time a lot - but AFTP is better).

Considering their criteria (greatest and most influential), I think a case could be made for the soundtrack to O Brother, Where Art Thou? It certainly was very successful commercially, and turned many people on to bluegrass and traditional music.

Pink Floyd should be present.

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It is my latent obsessive compulsiveness that keeps me returning to this list. It occurred to me over the weekend that while Garth Brooks made the list. Steve Earle did not, neither did Lyle Lovett or Dwight Yoakam. These three made records in the 80's that crossed over genre's and changed what was possible in mainstream country.

I'm sure this is my own prejudice showing but the country artists represented are; Johnny Cash, Ray Charles, Dolly Parton, Willie Nelson, Lucinda William, Hank Williams and.........Garth Brooks?

Every so often I realize how out of step I am.

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It is my latent obsessive compulsiveness that keeps me returning to this list. It occurred to me over the weekend that while Garth Brooks made the list. Steve Earle did not, neither did Lyle Lovett or Dwight Yoakam. These three made records in the 80's that crossed over genre's and changed what was possible in mainstream country.

I'm sure this is my own prejudice showing but the country artists represented are; Johnny Cash, Ray Charles, Dolly Parton, Willie Nelson, Lucinda William, Hank Williams and.........Garth Brooks?

Every so often I realize how out of step I am.

My guess is this. Time being a populist magazine and mainstream country being populist as well decided to throw that constituancy a bone by selecting one huge mainstream act and chose Garth Brooks. The album itself is very enjoyable and probably the best in his catalouge. Now, don't get me wrong, I don't think it is one of the best 100 albums of all-time, but I could see how it could get included.

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I agree with what was said about the exclusion of independent artists and the inclusion of compilations especially in the 2000s category, but overall, I'm not too unhappy with the list in general.

There were some artists included I don't normally see on best of lists (except in guitar magazines) such as AC/DC and Metallica. The Metallica cd I would have chosen is the Black Album instead of Master of Puppets. The John Lennon solo album I would have chosen is Imagine instead of the eponymous one. I like Radiohead's OK Computer a lot, but I'm not a huge fan of Kid A. I would have liked to see XTC's Skylarking in the 80s list as someone mentioned earlier. The Miseducation of Lauren Hill is not listed in the 1990s, which is interesting because I've seen it listed in so many other places, and I've always thought that cd was overrated.

The list of 2000s disappoints me because 4 of the 9 cds listed were not 2000 recordings. There has been more great music that has been recorded in the 2000s than 3 hip-hop cds and 2 alternative ones.

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Oh, incidentally: what does it mean that of the "100 best albums of all time", all are from north america or western europe?

I think it means that Time Magazine is purchased by English-speaking readers who probably aren't all that familiar with Fela Kuti and Thomas Mapfumo. What do you expect them to do?

Time being the kind of publication that it is. I would expect that they do exactly what they did: reassure their readership that the best music in history is the same MOR stuff they already listen to.

What does it mean that we ignore and denigrate the cultural contributions of the global south in this way? What implications does it have for our awareness of global social and political issues? How does it contribute to the way we allow ourselves to view people of the developing world as less than human? Music crit has the potential to expand horizons, encourage a global view of citizenship. Canons which exclude representatives of the majority of the world's population perpetuate arrogant, insular small-minded attitudes.

Anyway, Fela usually sings in english, so that's no excuse.

Edited by Holy Moly!

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Time being the kind of publication that it is. I would expect that they do exactly what they did: reassure their readership that the best music in history is the same MOR stuff they already listen to.

What does it mean that we ignore and denigrate the cultural contributions of the global south in this way? What implications does it have for our awareness of global social and political issues? How does it contribute to the way we allow ourselves to view people of the developing world as less than human? Music crit has the potential to expand horizons, encourage a global view of citizenship. Canons which exclude representatives of the majority of the world's population perpetuate arrogant, insular small-minded attitudes.

Anyway, Fela usually sings in english, so that's no excuse.

Time is a mainstream news magazine with a subscriber base in the millions, and the people who read it speak English. That means that, by and large, its readership resides primarily in the United States, with a much smaller readership in places like the U.K., Australia, and New Zealand. Furthermore, its readership is no doubt composed of people who care deeply about music, and people who don't care at all.

To complain that this list didn't include any contributions from "the global south" is like complaining that Geoge W. Bush didn't deliver his State of the Union Address in Mandarin. Magazines, just like Presidents, cater to their constituencies. I think it's ridiculous to read "denigration" and "perpetuating arrogant, insular, small-minded attitudes" into this, and I, for one, would be thrilled if a few thousand people read that list and decided to check out Robert Johnson or John Coltrane because of it.

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