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Peter T Chattaway

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Also OT for this specific thread, but at least actually about movies.

vjmorton wrote:

: I just have one question ... is Pixar gonna come up with a new one every seven years?

:huh:

:huh:

:huh:

:D

Ditto, but with more :huh:'s (and a night's sleep) before the :D

28 UP was one of the seminal "filmgoing" experiences in my life. I remember watching it on PBS sometime around 1987-88, before I could really say I was much of a filmgoer, and being shocked at not only how engrossing and absorbing a 3-hour documentary could be but also the way the film allowed us to see so clearly in a child the adult he'd come to be. Even the radical shifts within a person make a kind of teleological sense, for example the two biggest messups -- the working-class girl at 21, the tramp at 28. The film-makers clearly intended to make something about the British class system but wound up making something far more interesting, and something that even works against the grain of the intended theme -- the timelessness of personality and character. The fact it was a documentary about British schoolchildren that I was watching with my parents at age 20-something probably contributed some to my interest.

By 35, the repetitiveness in the UP series, the unavoidable redundancy of much of the new film if you've seen the older one, and the limits on freshness and shock of discovery meant the film slowed down a bit. By 42, the way that middle-age itself tends to settle into its own grooves meant the gas tank was empty. I have not even seen 49.

Edited by vjmorton

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Also OT for this specific thread, but at least actually about movies.

....

By 35, the repetitiveness in the UP series, the unavoidable redundancy of much of the new film if you've seen the older one, and the limits on freshness and shock of discovery meant the film slowed down a bit. By 42, the way that middle-age itself tends to settle into its own grooves meant the gas tank was empty. I have not even seen 49.

Oh, but 49 will have some surprises. Give it a chance.

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Link to our thread on the Up series.

vjmorton wrote:

: By 35, the repetitiveness in the UP series, the unavoidable redundancy of much of the new film if you've seen the older one, and the limits on freshness and shock of discovery meant the film slowed down a bit. By 42, the way that middle-age itself tends to settle into its own grooves meant the gas tank was empty. I have not even seen 49.

FWIW, the only ones I have seen are 28 Up and 49 Up, and in my own blurb on the latter movie, I wrote: "Granted, the choices that these people make are still limited and influenced by their backgrounds, but they don't seem so determined -- or, more to the point, predetermined -- any more." There's a little more detail about that at the link.

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The new trailer isn't doing a whole lot for me. The talking dog might be cute on its own, but strikes me as a bit "meh" in this context, and the wacky-wacky-wacky action seems almost indistinguishable to me from the wacky-wacky-wacky action in many other cartoons. I think it may be kind of telling that this trailer places such a HEAVY emphasis on the logos for most or all of Pixar's previous films.

That doesn't mean this isn't a great film. It might just be impossible to market.

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That doesn't mean this isn't a great film. It might just be impossible to market.

From everything I've read about the film, this seems to be the case. The trailer doesn't really suggest that it's a story about aging; even though everything I've read from people who saw the first 45 minutes say that theme is central to the film.

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The new trailer isn't doing a whole lot for me.

Other than Wall-E's (to a degree), I haven't been fond of any of the trailers for Pixar's films; they generally make the films seem generic and/or stupid. Up's trailer is no different, other than the one indelible image SDG has pilfered. I'd almost worry more if the trailer were too awesome.

Dale

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What Dale said. The Incredibles was the last Pixar trailer that I worried over; I've now learned my lesson.

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SDG wrote:

: The Incredibles was the last Pixar trailer that I worried over . . .

Really? Huh. I seem to recall that my friends and I loved it because it made use of John Barry's theme for On Her Majesty's Secret Service -- and sure enough, the movie itself had a nicely Bondian score. (The composer on that film is now doing the score for J.J. Abrams' Star Trek -- loves the retro stuff, he does!)

Going into The Incredibles, my only concern was how that film -- and any future Pixar films -- might mess with my analysis that Pixar's earlier films could all be classified, neatly and simply, as "rural" (A Bug's Life), "urban" (Monsters Inc.) and "suburban" (Toy Story), with a special nod to "odyssey/journey" (Finding Nemo). It seemed like Pixar was now going in the direction of hybridizing these categories, hence The Incredibles was basically a suburbanization of an urban genre (i.e. the superhero genre). But I gave up trying to categorize the Pixar films that way by the time Cars came along.

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SDG wrote:

: The Incredibles was the last Pixar trailer that I worried over . . .

Really? Huh. I seem to recall that my friends and I loved it because it made use of John Barry's theme for On Her Majesty's Secret Service -- and sure enough, the movie itself had a nicely Bondian score.

I don't remember the score to the trailer at all. I do remember that the last half of the trailer was the same fat joke over and over.

Actually, here it is:

Edited by M. Dale Prins

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What Dale said, plus there was another trailer that focused on Frozone during the droid attack ("HoneYY... Where is my super-suit?" "Why do you need it?" etc.). While considerably funnier than the trailer Dale references, there was no hint there of the specialness of the film.

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Without Google, I'm not sure if I ever would have reached the :D stage.

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For what it's worth, I really liked the new trailer (and I haven't seen the first one, either). I agree that I always end up liking Pixar movies WAY more than I do the trailer, so I felt like I was able to decode this one. I was chuckling most of the way through, and Up just shot way, way

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Up is set to open the Cannes Film Festival in May, the first for an animated film.

Disney/Pixar's Up will have its world premiere as the opening film of the 62nd Cannes Film Festival on May 13, becoming the first animated film as well as the first 3D film ever to open the celebrated festival, organizers announced today (Thursday). It is due to be released in the U.S. on May 29th. While other animated films have been featured in and out of competition at Cannes over the years, the French black-and-white film Persepolis is the only one ever to have won a prize, taking the Jury Award in 2007. While in making its announcement the festival listed nine other animated films that had been included in its Official Selection in the past, it oddly made no mention of Persepolis, a film about an Iranian girl growing up during the Islamic revolution. Like Up, Persepolis was to have had the prestigious spot as the opening film at the Bangkok Film Festival in 2007 but was yanked following protests by Iranian diplomats in the Thai capital.

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Peter from Slashfilm tweets: "Up was great, typical of Pixar, impressed with the subtle 3D and how it added investment to one particular scene in the climax." Then: "There is a 3D moment in Up where you feel the danger of the height of the moment, you care about the consequences"

Edited by Overstreet

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Todd McCarthy at Variety argues that it might be better in 2-D than 3-D. To avoid plot spoilers, I only read the beginning and the end of the review. But wow, this is what I always hope to hear about a Pixar film:

Depending on what you think of "Cars," Pixar makes it either 9
Edited by Overstreet

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Well, the preview was "all about sensory bombardment and volume", so it's good to hear that the film is more than that.

I do hope I will like this film. But, watching The Incredibles with the kids a few weeks ago, it dawned on me that that was probably the last Pixar film for which I felt an uncomplicated love. Cars bored me out of my tree (when it didn't outright annoy me), and Ratatouille and WALL-E were likable but somewhat mixed bags. Oh, how I would love to feel the love again.

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Mike D'Angelo at Cannes: "Up ('09 Docter): 77/B+. Gets a little sappy at times, but the story keeps throwing delightful curveballs and the dogs are just pure gold."

For those who don't know, D'Angelo's scale is famously harsh, so a 77 is much better than you might otherwise think. Just for comparison, his grades for other recent Pixar: WALL-E, 80; Ratatouille, 65; Cars, 55; The Incredibles, 68; Finding Nemo, 64.

Dale

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Jeffrey Wells:

The animated 3D Up (Disney/Pixar, 5.29) is a comic adventure fable of a very high order. Even by Pixar's high standards it's a notch or two above the norm. Visually luscious and spunky and intriguing at every turn, it's an amusing (i.e., somewhat funny), sometimes touching, briskly paced film that's about...well, pretty much everything that relatively healthy, forward-thinking middle-class people care about. . . .

And yet it's a fairly square and tidy thing as the same time. It's not meant as a putdown to say that Up is too immersed in buoyant punchiness and mainstream movie-tude, which basically boils down to Pixar's always-front-and-center task of giving the family audience stuff to laugh at and go "oooh" and "aahh" about, to finally matter all that much. It's too entertaining, in put it another way, to sink in all that deeply. . . .

So what am I saying, boiled down? That it's really quite well made and has an almost stoner sensibility in portions but may be a little too good for the lowbrows and at the same time isn't really deep and resonant enough to penetrate with quality-cinema buffs? Something like that. I realize what I'm writing (and re-reading) may sound a bit contradictory but there it is.

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Pixar's 'Up' floats but doesn't soar with opening-night crowd

The audience -- the people around us, anyway -- seemed to enjoy the movie as it played, laughing at the comedy spots, clenching up at the action scenes and even shedding a tear (beneath their 3-D glasses) during the (wonderfully effective) melancholy moments.

But the post-screening response -- an overused but accurate gauge of audience feeling at this fest -- was noticeably tempered. The continuous waves of ovation that can last five or 10 minutes when an audience really loves a Cannes film (especially an opening-night one), didn't happen.

Instead, what followed the credits was scattered applause that lasted about one or two minutes. That's not, by most standards, anything close to a disappointment, but given the reaction it could have gotten, it wasn't overwhelming either.

Steven Zeitchik, Hollywood Reporter, May 13

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This may be the first time that Cannes hasn't gone berserk for a 3D animated children's flick. I'm thunderstruck. ;) But seriously, I still can't believe Pixar got to open a movie at Cannes. And I'm thrilled for what at this date remains a 100% rating at Rotten Tomatoes. Baby steps, Pixar. Baby steps.

Edited by Overstreet

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