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The Shack?

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Brilliant, Rich. Thanks so much for posting this.

I still haven't been able to summon up enough enthusiasm to read it yet but I know quite a bit about it, and pick up again and again that it's been deeply significant for hurting people. I have often suspected that people on, or beyond, the fringes of churches are the ideal audience for this book.

The problem comes when people derive their theology from it.

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The problem comes when people derive their theology from it.

Thanks Tony. Basically I'm hoping that Alpha, Stowell, and Steadman will help with this problem. To be sure, Ray is rather far from formulating theology, but that is not to slight his intelligence and reasoning. He's sharp. He's also not really accustomed to piecing together ideas and theories into something like a coherent worldview, let alone system or philosophy. He's not that kind of guy. I sense a reasonably intelligent man taking the first steps towards an inner life and self analysis. Not your typical "won soul" if it comes to that.

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Here come the commentaries! Turns out there are two -- not one, but two -- books called Finding God in The Shack now. And according to Amazon.com, they came out only two days apart!

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I share a belated agreement with Rich. I did not read The Shack, but had heard a lot about it. At Christmas I gave a copy to my daughter-in-law, who'd just lost her father and dear stepfather. It really spoke to her, and to her mother, as well. Later I tried reading it myself and couldn't get past the first couple chapters. While I feel it's not for me, I cannot negate it as a book which has done good for many who are faltering in their faith.

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The flak over 'The Shack'

William Paul Young's bestselling novel about a father's renewal of faith after suffering an unspeakable tragedy has spawned a tangle of lawsuits over royalties and even the book's authorship.

Los Angeles Times, July 13

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William Paul Young invites Shack critic Mark Driscoll to a Seattle smackdown (Shackdown?) on Friday, Sept. 10!

Details here (but you'll have to scroll down a ways).

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Might as well warn everyone now of the impending storm of unnecessary media hype within evangelical circles -

Hachette Book Group has released some details on the next book by author of The Shack William Paul Young, which they first announced in August 2011 after Young settled his lawsuit with Windblown Media founders Wayne Jacobsen and Brad Cummings. Young's book is called CROSS ROADS, "the story of a driven man who falls into a coma and experiences relational entanglements that allow him to revisit choices he made during his life," and is set for publication November 13 through HBG's Faith Words imprint. Publisher Rolf Zettersen says in the release, "In the tradition of The Shack, Paul Young has written a wonderfully creative and provocative story that will certainly stir imaginations and hearts. It entrenches Paul's reputation as a major novelist of our time." FaithWords will also publish a devotional this fall, The Shack: Reflections for Every Day of the Year.

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It entrenches Paul's reputation as a major novelist of our time."

Hrm. I didn't hate The Shack, but I found it pretty dully written. So I'm raising a doubtful eyebrow to this one.

EDIT: Of course, being a "major novelist" has nothing to do with the quality of the novels produced. I would count Dan Brown as a "major novelist" of the past decade, but I wouldn't come close to suggesting that his books are worth reading [based on a cursory glance]. smile.png

EDIT EDIT: I suddenly remembered being told, about two years ago [between colleges, while I was working at a bookstore] that The Shack is "the greatest Christian book ever written." I had to restrain myself from asking if the speaker had ever read The Idiot.

Edited by NBooth

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On 2/3/2009 at 3:34 AM, Peter T Chattaway said:

Five reviews -- by one man. Brilliant stuff.

Hot damn, that is amazing writing — and it almost dares you to find an approach to the book that doesn't boil down to one of these ways. What's more, you never ultimately get the writer's own perspective. He's deconstructed himself out of existence. 

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On 10/18/2016 at 8:52 PM, SDG said:

Hot damn, that is amazing writing — and it almost dares you to find an approach to the book that doesn't boil down to one of these ways. What's more, you never ultimately get the writer's own perspective. He's deconstructed himself out of existence. 

The link isn't working for me.

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I think it's been re-posted under another URL, but you can enter the old URL in archive.org and call up the article that way.

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