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Gina

L. M. Montgomery

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Don't know if anyone else has been reading about the recent revelation that the Anne of Green Gables author may have committed suicide. I've collected all the main links in this blog post for anyone who wants to see them.

Her journals are worth reading, but terribly sad, especially the later volumes. Probably many people have experienced as many hardships as she did, but each one hit her so hard that I guess they finally wore her down. How awful it must have been to try to deal with depression in those days. :(

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That's so...sad. My mom and sister are fans of the Anne of Green Gables books, but my personal favorites have always been the Emily books. Also, Blue Castle has always been a rather comforting tea-and-window-seat read. I'd never even heard this before, and I'm going to have to do some more research, maybe.

:(

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Sad indeed. And adds further to my feeling that learning about the biography of authors of one's beloved books rarely adds anything helpful to one's appreciation for the books. I mean, I guess I appreciate the books a bit more, knowing how hard, at times, the author may have struggled with her own life, and Montgomery's granddaughter has a good point, that perhaps her depression was a symptom of the times she lived in. [sigh.]

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LARB: Ten Things I Learned From Loving "Anne of Green Gables" by Sarah Mesle

 

3: How To Do Magic
 
More invested in minutia than grand narratives, the Anne books are unusual in their storytelling pleasures. Many of the YA series I’m drawn to focus on the emotional experience of a young central character who learns that the world is more dramatic and magical than expected — think the hidden, escapist worlds of Harry Potter, The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe, or The Wizard of Oz. Under the mundane surface of life, these books promise, there is epic adventure awaiting a hero! But while Harry and Lucy and Dorothy offer heroism, they offer it only when the right contexts, and the right mentors, present themselves. Anne, however, has no Dumbledore or Aslan to initiate her into a larger understanding. Instead, Anne herself is the portal — the tornado, the wardrobe — who helps the characters around her understand that the “mundane” world, itself, was always already full of deep magic.

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