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NEW! The Christianity Today Movies blog

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Congrats to Peter Chattaway, who was chosen as the chief blogger for a brand new blog at CT Movies.

Most of the posts are imported from Peter's own blog, and there are some by Mark Moring. It's likely that others will join them soon.

That means there won't be any more Reel News, the weekly news column that I helmed a few years ago, and that Josh Hurst has been running since then. (Thanks for all of your work, Josh!)

It'll be interesting to see how this progresses. It'll be even more interesting, since the Comments are wide open to CT's readership.

Edited by Overstreet

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I am glad comments are open. And congrats, Peter! I always enjoy your newsbites.

Being part of a similar kind of news aggregate blog, I like how these things work. I do, however, hope CT will pick up a few contributors that are locked into less mainstream news. This blog could be a way to introduce CT readers to the kind of cinema that the Movies site seems uncomfortable with covering. I would almost rather we here at A and F would have put something like this together instead of CT. Would probably have been more... open, current, relevant to contemporary American and international film news. What's the word I am looking for? Anyway, too late now.

Like you say, it will be interesting to see how it progresses.

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It'll be interesting to see how this progresses. It'll be even more interesting, since the Comments are wide open to CT's readership.

With any luck, that'll move much of the hate mail from Mark's inbox over to the blog...

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With any luck, that'll move much of the hate mail from Mark's inbox over to the blog...

That is what I am curious to see. Which hate mail? The "Why are you writing about movies with swearing in them?" or "Why on earth don't you have someone in Toronto this year?"

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Thanks, all.

And, my luck being what it is, the day this announcement went public was also the day that my son spilled a drink all over my laptop, thus frying the keyboard, thus prompting me to buy a new laptop a little earlier than I had planned to do. And so I have done no blogging at all since the announcement went out, and I have spent the weekend getting used to Windows Vista and a French Canadian keyboard, and... and... and...

Anyway. I've had to adapt to worse things in the past, so I'm sure I'll adapt to this, too.

(Note to UK-based A&Fers -- which of these keyboards do you use?)

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Congrats Peter,

This one (UK) is the standard, but the replacement I bought when my son was sick on my keyboard, is this one (US) (as the ebay seller did say it was US format, and, like a fool, I assumed a UK seller would say if he was selling a non-UK format keyboard). But because I regularly use 3 other keyboards in the UK format, and almost touch type anyway, it seemed silly to change my keyboards settings over to US so the keys don't quite match the functions.

However, you can set it up so that at the touch of a button (or rather the touch of 3 simultaneously) you can switch from UK functions to US and back. So if I need things such as the forward slash, I simply do that.

Matt

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MattPage wrote:

: However, you can set it up so that at the touch of a button (or rather the touch of 3 simultaneously) you can switch from UK functions to US and back. So if I need things such as the forward slash, I simply do that.

Yes, I can toggle between US and Canadian French and Canadian Multilingual, too. But there is one significant difference here, and that is the PHYSICAL layout of the keys. Due to the "procedural memory" built into my fingers over a lifetime of using the US keyboard, I am used to certain keys being in certain places ... but, these last few days, whenever I try to hit the "enter" key or the left-hand "shift" key, half the time I seem to hit the slash key instead. I'm learning to adapt, though.

Here's the UK keyboard:

400px-KB_United_Kingdom.svg.png

Here's the Canadian French keyboard, which shares the physical shape of the UK keyboard:

400px-KB_Canadian_French.svg.png

And here's the US keyboard that I've been using all my life:

400px-KB_United_States-NoAltGr.svg.png

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I got used to the UK keyboard in a few weeks, and actually had trouble coming back to the US standard.

The French one has always driven me batty, but tends to make you sound more interesting and intelligent. It is worth getting the hang of.

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I use the standard UK on two and half of my machines, but mostly I'm working on my Macbook which is a little different again - more like the US but with an enter key like the UK rather than the one in the diagram above. Why 2.5 machines? Because on my office PC I have a standard UK keyboard and a mac keyboard plugged in at the same time. I usually use the Mac keyboard, though I have to log in on the standard one, but anyone else who uses the computer shoves the alien white board out of the way after a few moments of splendid indecision.

Congrats, by the way Peter. I hope this new blog works well.

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Well if we're talking physically, then the work computer at my main job has an ergo keyboard which really throws people, but I like it.

And FWIW on my laptop, I keep trying to hit "enter" and get forward slash.

Matt

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Um... thread split, maybe?

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In my opinion Stargate SG-1 is one of the best sci-fi shows ever made. Not only does it have a very original and compelling premise but it also has some of the best and most original characters of any TV show. As well as this it manages to pull of not only convincing character development but also manages to move the show itself forward at a steady and realistic pace. It has great writers with fabulous plotlines and dialogue. The acting is also some of the best you will find in a genre show of this type. Richard Dean Anderson in particular ii am not really into realistic programmes. i watched "hollyoaks" for a while and a love "prison break" thats it. i love programmes like "smallville" "lost" "buffy the vampire slayer" "angel" and even "sabrina the teenage witch"... however i watched One Tree Hill and it was amazing.

the story lines are fantastic, i am only at season 4 myself, but if season 5 and 6 are as good as the rest, im sure i will stay hooked, they make you love a character then they kill them, or the leave, they make you fist wrenched and heart broken. total fanstastic :)

s superb.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I remember my first beer.

Edited by Overstreet

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From the CT movies blog:

Edited by Overstreet

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160px-CFHHenry.jpg

Carl F.H. is not amused.

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MLeary wrote:

: Carl F.H. is not amused.

I probably shouldn't invite criticism of my colleagues, but I'm a details man, and I'm just dying to know WHY C.F.H. would not be amused. (Related question: would C.F.H. have had any interest in film at all, or would it have been "mere entertainment" to him?)

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Never mind that, who is CFH?

Matt

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Never mind that, who is CFH?

Here's your man.

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than-q

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<!--quoteo(post=193969:date=Feb 24 2009, 01:43 AM:name=Peter T Chattaway)--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Peter T Chattaway @ Feb 24 2009, 01:43 AM) <a href="index.php?act=findpost&pid=193969"><{POST_SNAPBACK}></a></div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->I probably shouldn't invite criticism of my colleagues, but I'm a details man, and I'm just dying to know WHY C.F.H. would not be amused. (Related question: would C.F.H. have had any interest in film at all, or would it have been "mere entertainment" to him?)<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

I have been meaning to write something more extensive on that, and will try to soon. But the essence of the joke is this:

Even though I am glad that evangelical theology has moved a bit past Henry at this point in its sensitivity to the formative influences of modernism, I still value his approach to church and culture. Due to his position in the recent history of conservative Christian thought, he has been one of the most common whipping boys in emergent/ing church literature. This is completely unwarranted. I worked for several years in the archives that contain the remainder of his papers and correspondence (about four full-sized file cabinets worth) and was consistently amazed at the depth of his learning and the creative intelligence of his theological responses to people and events. This was all at the same time I was also being introduced to critical theory and continental thought, and I still consider it a bit providential that I could sit and rifle through Henry's brain for a while after a long class on Ricoeur or Derrida. Even though I disagreed with Henry on a number of issues, it was a nice balance.

<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Uneasy-Conscience-Modern-Fundamentalism/dp/080282661X" target="_blank">The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism</a> is <i>the</i> great unread Evangelical work (one of the few documents that can actually be described as "Evangelical" in any meaningful way). The brand of cultural reasoning you find in this book is the same one that gave birth to Christianity Today. It was pretty provocative at the time, and in some ways still is. But it was marked by erudition. He was known for teaching to the top 1% of his class, wanting Christians to do the tough work of thinking deeply about texts and ideas rather than having their hands held by the fundamentalist status quo. His definition of "evangelicalism," the critical spirit behind CT, had the proclamation of the gospel at its center, intellectual excellence as its form, and the public square as its venue. Unfortunately, he was eventually fired from his slot as CT editor by the financial backer of the magazine for - oddly enough - not being political enough.

All this is to say that I dig what Henry was all about. I was excited at the prospect of CT Movies, but now wish that it had enough Henrian gumption to give its best critics more latitude to do what they do best and resist the temptation to address the lowest common denominator of culture with things like live-blogging the Oscars. He didn't really seem that into film, which is fine, but he certainly didn't care for this kind of journalism.

Edited by MLeary

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