Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Peter T Chattaway

Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace

82 posts in this topic

Link to the post in the 'Converting two-dimensional films into 3-D' thread on The Phantom Menace's upcoming 3D re-release in 2012.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't Lucas have enough money already? Or at least a new idea?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Doesn't Lucas have enough money already? Or at least a new idea?

No.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

old wave wrote:

: Here's a must-read film analysis of the "Duel of the Fates" (warning, extremely long).

Very interesting. E.g.:

Cutting to a medium shot, Darth Maul is shown igniting his double-bladed lightsaber, a classic addition to the series’ villains which serves to deepen the film’s ties to world-religious iconography as
a dark Christological figure
. Evoking the cross image of the crucifixion, Maul’s saber deepens the Biblical associations of his entire ensemble. Many commentators called his appearance devilish, yet each one of his Satanically inspired features also creates an allusion to Christ—the crown of horns on Maul’s head, just one letter away from being a crown of thorns; the red-and-black tattoos on his face, recalling the red-and-black opening title sequence of Martin Scorsese’s The Last Temptation of Christ.

That film famously portrayed Jesus as a troubled young man led astray from his destined path by the lure of romantic love, the same temptation that ultimately undoes Anakin Skywalker. TPM spends a lot of time turning him into a Christ-like prophesized savior himself, introducing the controversial Force-associated plot device of midichlorians mostly to add a scientific root to the revelation of Anakin’s virgin birth, and indulging in a prolonged pod-race sequence on Tatooine (the film’s other centerpiece action-sequence) which consciously evokes Ben Hur[4]. The references embedded in Maul’s design help serve to offer a dark echo of the light Christ-themes of young Skywalker’s circumstances, offering a crystal-clear projection of the dark figure his savior-complex will take him in his evolution into the twisted Darth Vader.

It had also never occurred to me before that the sliding blast doors function like the "wipes" between scenes, but it's an interesting point.

Oh, and let's not forget, one of the cast members in The Last Temptation of Christ was Irvin Kershner -- the director of The Empire Strikes Back. (He plays Zebedee, father of James and John and the man who wants to stone Mary Magdalene to death.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

old wave wrote:

: Here's a must-read film analysis of the "Duel of the Fates" (warning, extremely long).

Very interesting.

I visit Wonders in the Dark quite regularly, they have some terrific essays and "Top 100 lists" (Peter, you might want to check out the current Top 100 Animated Films series they have going on at the moment). I read this essay back when it first appeared. Bob Clark (the essayist) is one of the biggest supporters of the Star Wars prequels, and the overall saga. It's always fun to read his other review/essays, and see how he will work in a Star Wars comparison. Such as his most recent article, a revisit of the original Miracle on 34th Street...

Bob Clark - Wonders in the Dark - I Want to Believe: “Miracle on 34th Street”

...That’s more or less what makes the central conflict of the film, from a child’s perspective. Yes, there’s the legalese passion play that Gwenn suffers through as his identity (and sanity) are put to the test by the court, overseen by Judge Gene Lockheart ( I can only imagine how terrified children of the 40′s might’ve been if they’d seen his quisling collaborator in Fritz Lang’s Hangmen Also Die). But really, it’s just an externalization of the more intimate, and far more serious dilemma of Natalie Wood, the little girl who can’t quite make up her mind whether or not Gwenn is just a nice old man with whiskers, or something more. With his clipped, authoritative and pleasing voice, it’s easy to see him inhabiting the same kind of classic old-mentor role as an Obi-Wan or Gandalf– another wise, wizardly figure with a twinkle in his eye and a student to teach. When he performs small wonders throughout the film– like letting his beard get tugged on, recommending a Macy’s patron to Gimbel’s for a toy, or singing a song in a song in Dutch for a little orphan (one wonders whether her parents might’ve raised her to spin a dreidel, had it not been for the war)– there’s a magic similar to the kind seen when Alec Guinness played a Jedi mind-trick, or when Ian McKellan charmed hobbitlings with fireworks. Like any saint, the movie gives him three miracles to perform for his canonization, and even makes him, before legal and mental health authorities, something of a martyr....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3D version coming February 2012.

If Lucas releases one 3D-converted episode per year, then he should be finished converting the entire saga by 2017 -- the 40th anniversary of the original Star Wars.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:unsure:

Perhaps it's unfair to judge based on how much of a rush job was required for the 3D conversion of Clash of the Titans, but it was revealed today that the same company - Prime Focus - is who George Lucas has opted to handle the 3D conversion of The Phantom Menace.

Story here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They could make it in 6D and it would still be a.w.f.u.l.

Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was in grade 3 when The Phantom Menace came out. I remember counting down the days. I remember watching the trailer for the film at my best friend's house where he said he liked Jar-Jar Binks (I've never really had a problem with Jar-Jar) and where we wondered if Qui-Gon was Anakin's father. At the time I saw the movie I loved it, but my opinion of it since has decreased. I still think the worst of the prequels is Attack of the Clones.

To me at least, one of the things lacking in the prequels, especially in The Phantom Menace, is the fact that the "good guys" (The Old Republic) are still in charge. Yes, the Trade Federation has their battleships encircled around Naboo but it's not as if they control the galaxy. One planet might fall, but the rest of the galaxy would move on. In the OT, the Empire had complete dominance of the galaxy and so there is more of an underdog mentality to the Rebel Alliance than to those hoping to liberate Naboo from the Trade Federation.

I was always disappointed Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith didn't have as much merchandise. I liked collecting the Star Wars micro machines. And no more Star Wars pop cans!

mountaindew_pepsi.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was always disappointed Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith didn't have as much merchandise. I liked collecting the Star Wars micro machines. And no more Star Wars pop cans!

You know, for all the grousing about Star Wars merchandising, I agree; I still remember the action figures that came with little chips that played lines from the movie. Everything looked fresh and cool and seemed to promise an amazing experience. The later prequels never really reached that; even the "making of" scrapbooks were disappointing.

I actually think Ep I stands up better as the years go by; certainly compared to AotC (which I have sentimental reasons for loving, but which is still bad, bad, bad) and RotS (the first and last twenty minutes are the best Star Wars movie ever, but the middle commits the greatest sin imaginable--that of being boring). It's still not great, and I can't imagine wanting to see it again in the theater. It's easy to see how the Podrace would look great in 3D, but I'm not that desperate for 3D Jar Jar.

Edited by NBooth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Winter shaker said:

:I was in grade 3 when The Phantom Menace came out.

:I was always disappointed Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith didn't have as much merchandise.

I liked collecting the Star Wars micro machines. And no more Star Wars pop cans!

Gosh reading that makes me feel old. :blink:

For what it's worth my old spaceships and action figures from the original Star Wars movie are still sitting in

my parents attic.

As a boy that film had such an impact on me that it's one of the reasons I became so interested in films and storytelling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My boys now play with my old Kenner toys; I thought about trying to save them for resale, but they were so beat up from my years of playing with them that they're actually worth less than the price of the new Hasbro versions. It warms my heart to see the boys have my old toys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My boys now play with my old Kenner toys; I thought about trying to save them for resale, but they were so beat up from my years of playing with them that they're actually worth less than the price of the new Hasbro versions. It warms my heart to see the boys have my old toys.

My cousins had some old Star Wars action figures that I stole permanently-borrowed from my aunt's house. I never understood why some of those action figures looked nothing like the actual movie characters, including one of my favourites, Ponda Baba:

5000602300_0c053bd461.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I actually think Ep I stands up better as the years go by; certainly compared to AotC (which I have sentimental reasons for loving, but which is still bad, bad, bad) and RotS (the first and last twenty minutes are the best Star Wars movie ever, but the middle commits the greatest sin imaginable--that of being boring).

I dunno. I think the first twenty minutes of ROTS are mighty "meh," and the last twenty have some momentum, but also have enough doses of awfulness to keep me from thinking they make it anywhere near greatness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

winter shaker wrote:

: . . . we wondered if Qui-Gon was Anakin's father.

!!! Seriously?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

winter shaker wrote:

: . . . we wondered if Qui-Gon was Anakin's father.

!!! Seriously?

To be fair, I believe he mentioned that they were in Grade 3 (8-9 years old).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually think Ep I stands up better as the years go by; certainly compared to AotC (which I have sentimental reasons for loving, but which is still bad, bad, bad) and RotS (the first and last twenty minutes are the best Star Wars movie ever, but the middle commits the greatest sin imaginable--that of being boring).

I dunno. I think the first twenty minutes of ROTS are mighty "meh," and the last twenty have some momentum, but also have enough doses of awfulness to keep me from thinking they make it anywhere near greatness.

Ok, let me rephrase: the first twenty minutes are an entertaining set of action sequences, and the last twenty (coasting mostly on stuff like bringing back the Blockade Runner) have far more punch than they have any right to, given the six preceding hours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok, let me rephrase: the first twenty minutes are an entertaining set of action sequences, and the last twenty (coasting mostly on stuff like bringing back the Blockade Runner) have far more punch than they have any right to, given the six preceding hours.

I can live with that. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My boys now play with my old Kenner toys; I thought about trying to save them for resale, but they were so beat up from my years of playing with them that they're actually worth less than the price of the new Hasbro versions. It warms my heart to see the boys have my old toys.

My cousins had some old Star Wars action figures that I stole permanently-borrowed from my aunt's house. I never understood why some of those action figures looked nothing like the actual movie characters, including one of my favourites, Ponda Baba:

5000602300_0c053bd461.jpg

If my memory serves, some of the merchandise for the original film was released before the movie was. As a boy I had Star Wars pillow cases

where the mains characters and design looked different than the movie.

A bit of the confession I still had one of the pillow cases on one of my pillows as an adult. When my wife and I were first dating she was horrified

to see that I still slept on a Star Wars pillowcase. B)

Edited by Attica

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My boys now play with my old Kenner toys; I thought about trying to save them for resale, but they were so beat up from my years of playing with them that they're actually worth less than the price of the new Hasbro versions. It warms my heart to see the boys have my old toys.

My cousins had some old Star Wars action figures that I stole permanently-borrowed from my aunt's house. I never understood why some of those action figures looked nothing like the actual movie characters, including one of my favourites, Ponda Baba:

5000602300_0c053bd461.jpg

If my memory serves, some of the merchandise for the original film was released before the movie was. As a boy I had Star Wars pillow cases

where the mains characters and design looked different than the movie.

A bit of the confession I still had one of the pillow cases on one of my pillows as an adult. When my wife and I were first dating she was horrified

to see that I still slept on a Star Wars pillowcase. B)

I do recall hearing that they didn't have enough of the Star Wars toys produced in time so for Christmas people would buy a certificate that would be a voucher for the action figures or something like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Comedian David Mitchell's latest piece in The Guardian, primarily about extensions to the Harry Potter franchise, really hits the PM nail on the head:

That's an attitude that strikes a chord with me and reminds me of Star Wars. Every generation must lose its innocence, must see the brightly painted nursery wall smashed away by the wrecking ball of betrayal to reveal a blighted landscape. For our predecessors, it was the Somme, the Great Depression, the Holocaust or Vietnam; for my generation, it was The Phantom Menace.

The problem isn't just that it's terrible but that it also retrospectively spoils the original films. George Lucas took the hinted-at mythical, ancient yet futuristic realm of his first films and filled in all the detail like a tedious nerd. He ruined his own creation. It was as if Leonardo da Vinci had painted a speech bubble on the Mona Lisa in which she explained her state of mind. Everything that was magical, mysterious and half alluded to, he now ploddingly dramatised, making it seem dull and trainspotterish. Those three prequels worked like aversion therapy for my addiction to the franchise.

Which makes me think I really should pose the Narnia questions I have.

Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Lucas was replacing the puppet Yoda of Episodes V and VI with a CG Yoda, there'd be heck to pay. But the puppet Yoda of Episode I? Some of us were underwhelmed by it when the first trailer came out in November 1998 (I just checked my e-mail archives from that month, and yup, there's a note or two from our very own Overstreet there!), so replacing it with a CG Yoda that was explicitly based on the Yoda of Episodes V and VI is no big deal. But I'm not sure I like EITHER set of facial expressions here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I HATE the tinkering that George Lucas does to his films, but yes, that Episode 1 Yoda needs to be replaced digitally. What the hell were they thinking with that Episode 1 puppet? Not only is it a poor representation of Yoda, it's just a terrible puppet. Its movements, expressions, mannerisms, etc. seem light years BEHIND the puppet from the original trilogy. Perhaps Frank Oz was just having a series of off days, or perhaps he just didn't care.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0