Jump to content

MARVEL’S AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.


Recommended Posts

Ian Hart is an actor who appeared in the last episode.  I think Jeff's thoughts on the Cabin In the Woods connection are not connected to the actor...he was just pleased to see that actor.

"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 59
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Right. Ian Hart was an actor who really started getting attention in the mid-90s for playing John Lennon in Backbeat, and he was the best thing about The End of the Affair.

 

And yeah, the Cabin comment is a separate thing, related to a certain high-tech fence that appears in this episode.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

CrimsonLine wrote:

: Who's Ian Hart?

Ian Hart played John Lennon twice in the early '90s -- in The Hours and Times (1991) and Backbeat (1994) -- and he apparently played the part again in an episode of Playhouse Presents this year (the IMDb summary: "In 1991 50-year old John Lennon,living on the dole in Birmingham and following the moderate success of the Beatles, recalls how he left the band in 1962 after they were persuaded to release 'How Do You Do It?' as a single, rather than 'Love Me Do'.").

He was also the first actor to play Voldemort, sort of, in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. (He actually played Professor Quirrell, but at the end of the film it is revealed that Voldemort's CGI face is sitting on the back of Quirrell's head -- and I think Hart might have contributed to the voice of the character.)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Character development continues to improve in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., as do hints of a longer narrative arc. The last two episodes (6 & 7) have given us intriguing information about character relationships and backstory, and the individual episode plots have been good fun as well. Fitz and Simmons are becoming distinct individuals, especially aided this week by Fitz's away mission with Ward and "the world's most dangerous sandwich." Coulson is questioning the system. Skye remains annoying (and looks too much like Simmons), but at least she has a goal.

 

Seventh episodes of Mutant Enemy series are traditionally key in some way, so I expect to look back on this week's and find new clues to the season, when it all works out.

There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree that this series keeps getting better and better. Stories are more coherent, and questions worth asking are being asked.

 

I love the constant back and forth about authority, and questions of following the rules or not - and how the answers are not the typical, knee-jerk, go against the rules, which is how Hollywood normally does things.

In case you were wondering, my name is spelled "Denes House," but it's pronounced "Throatwobbler Mangrove."
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 6 months later...

I'm really glad I stuck with this show. It started off OK, but definitely hit some slow/bumpy spots during the middle of the season. However, everything post-Captain America: The Winter Soldier -- the dissolution of S.H.I.E.L.D., the rise of Hydra, etc. -- gave the show a much-needed boost of urgency, not to mention some nice twists. And the finale? Very enjoyable. (I basically agree with everything here.)

 

I especially appreciated how unapologetically comic book-y it was, with constant winks to the audience, from the monologues to the gadgets, from the melodrama to the big reveals. And of course, there was that lovely scene between Fitz-Simmons that had echoes of Wesley and Fred's final moments in Angel. (OK, so maybe not that great, but still, I have such fondness for Fitz-Simmons and their relationship that the scene was the finale's high point for me.)

 

So yeah, can't wait for Season 2. Coulson's odd behavior at the very end, the rebuilding of S.H.I.E.L.D., Fitz's condition, the glorious return of Agent Koenig, Skye's parentage... I think it will all make for a pretty packed second season.

"I feel a nostalgia for an age yet to come..."
Opus, Twitter, Facebook

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, yep. Very happy how this season tied up. I think season 2 could wind up being a lot of fun.

Edited by Darryl A. Armstrong

"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

"If apologetics could prove God, I would lose all faith in Him." -- Josie

"What if--just what if--the very act of storytelling is itself redemptive? What if gathering up the scraps and fragments of a disordered life and binding them between the pages of a book in all of their fragmentary disorder is itself a gambit against that disorder?" -- NBooth

Link to post
Share on other sites

"I feel a nostalgia for an age yet to come..."
Opus, Twitter, Facebook

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Just got back from the biennial Slayage Conference on the Whedonverses, where Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. was quite controversial among the Whedon Studies scholars. Some, like posters here, had started out skeptical and ended feeling the season had rewarded our patience and promised interesting developments for next time. Others were extremely negative...one result.

There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...