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I suspect that the existence of this video makes Innaritu very happy. Unfortunately, all it proves is that he and Lubezki can mimic shots. It doesn't suggest anything about whether or not he has absorbed any sense of the poetic connotations that characterize Tarkovsky's films. It's that sense of so much art-like-ness, but so little art, in Innaritu's work that has frustrated me since 21 Grams.  

Once again, a master goes unrecognized at the Oscars, but his imitator decades later is celebrated as an innovative visionary.

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3 hours ago, Overstreet said:

I suspect that the existence of this video makes Innaritu very happy. Unfortunately, all it proves is that he and Lubezki can mimic shots. It doesn't suggest anything about whether or not he has absorbed any sense of the poetic connotations that characterize Tarkovsky's films. It's that sense of so much art-like-ness, but so little art, in Innaritu's work that has frustrated me since 21 Grams.  

Once again, a master goes unrecognized at the Oscars, but his imitator decades later is celebrated as an innovative visionary.

 

Down the road he'll be imitating George Miller, who really should have won last night's DGA award.

Edited by John Drew

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I can remember how, when the film started screening for critics, a few people tweeted comparisons to Malick, and a few *other* critics immediately slapped that down by saying that Malick comparisons were a lazy/ignorant substitute for Tarkovsky comparisons. (Wish I could remember exactly who said what, so I could link to said tweets here.)

Meanwhile, in other news, I came across a scathing review of Knight of Cups the other day from a critic who complained, among other things, about Chivo's heavy use of wide-angle lenses -- and that's always been one of the things I didn't like about The Revenant, but I know that that critic loved The Revenant! So, make of that what you will.

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2 hours ago, Overstreet said:

Josh Larsen's second-viewing review is very interesting.

Wow, I like that a lot. I'd have to watch the film again to see if it holds up, but that's fascinating. There was a theory along those lines for Gravity a few years ago (which I know you also didn't like.) :)

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I have a hard time believing the idea that he was ghost.  He was interacting with too many people and things.

Yet, I do think it is possible that the main reason he was staying alive was for vengeance (It think the film suggests that he was staying alive for more than that, but I'll go with this for now), and that his wife was calling him to her, being to forsake vengeance, die, and come to her.  At the end when he didn't reject vengeance she turned away from him leaving the option of coming to her closed.

Or it could just be that at the end of the film she had turned as the visions are now ended and he would continue with his life.  I'm assuming that there is a chance that he would live.

Edited by Attica

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I like this video better than the Tarkovsky comparison.

 

Edited by Overstreet

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Hmm. I tweeted that same thing several days ago. And Brody follows me on Twitter. No making any claim here. Just saying.

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On 2/7/2016 at 6:38 AM, NBooth said:

Embedding:

 

 

 

 

There's also that moment where Innaritu... mimics...? pays homage...? to fellow Mexican director Alejandro Jodorowsky, when Bridger witnesses a bird escaping from the chest wound of an tribesman in the decimated village.  I can't find the coreesponding image from The Revenant, but here's the image from Jodorowsky's El Topo...

jodorowsky-el-topo-bird.gif

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8 minutes ago, John Drew said:

There's also that moment where Innaritu... mimics...? pays homage...? to fellow Mexican director Alejandro Jodorowsky, when Bridger witnesses a bird escaping from the chest wound of an tribesman in the decimated village.  I can't find the corresponding image from The Revenant, but here's the image from Jodorowsky's El Topo...

Interesting. That makes this the second 2015 film with references to El Topo, if I was right in seeing some in Mad Max.

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Oh, gosh. That's beautiful.

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