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Jason Panella

What board games have you been playing lately?

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Thanks Jason for the info.  I just watched a twenty minute review/synopsis video of Eclipse over at The Dice Tower.  The guy there is a bit geeky, but gives a fairly good overview of the game. Thanks for the Board Game Geek link.  I was worried about how to get five guys in three different cities copies of the instructions, but that site has a PDF link to the instructions.  If I can find this at Barnes and Noble for around $50, I'll probably get it.  If not, I'm not sure I'll shell out more for a game that might only get played once every couple of years.  Which is why I have the Munchkin fall back :D!

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Thanks Jason for the info.  I just watched a twenty minute review/synopsis video of Eclipse over at The Dice Tower.  The guy there is a bit geeky, but gives a fairly good overview of the game. Thanks for the Board Game Geek link.  I was worried about how to get five guys in three different cities copies of the instructions, but that site has a PDF link to the instructions.  If I can find this at Barnes and Noble for around $50, I'll probably get it.  If not, I'm not sure I'll shell out more for a game that might only get played once every couple of years.  Which is why I have the Munchkin fall back biggrin.png!

 

DON'T MAKE FUN OF TOM. I must say, listening to their weekly podcast is an enjoyable experience. 

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Has anyone here played Eclipse?  It's apparently an interstellar battle scenario, with four basic steps:  Acquire ships, Acquire armament, Attack, and Upkeep,  I'm going on vacation next week, and half of that time is going to be spent up in a cabin with some gamer friends of mine.  We're kind of into a lot of games, anything from light card games such as Guillotine, to board games like Risk (various versions), to some more involved RPG's but usually the kind you can play in a couple of hours.  Anyways, someone posted a game in progress photo of Eclipse over the weekend, and I did some investigating into price (fairly expensive - $70 price range), longevity of the game, and (most importantly) learning curve for the initial first time run.  I've read some great reviews, but most say that the first run can be fairly long (one review said it took nearly two hours to set up the board and go over instructions, plus another 4hours for the game to play out). I'd like to hear some first hand experience.

Or, am I better off picking up a copy of The Good, the Bad, and the Munchkin, combine that with Star Munchkin, and see how close we can come to playing a version of Firefly Munchkin?

 

I own Eclipse, and I love Eclipse. Let's talk about Eclipse.

 

I've played some long space-themed games that have taken a while (Twilight Imperium, long considered the iconic "4X game," takes around 14 hours). Compared to that, Eclipse isn't bad at all. The game is surprisingly easy to learn, I think, because Eclipse meshes some European-style game mechanics with the epic space stuff. It also has—hands down—the best iconography I've seen in a board game. Chances are you can figure out a detail you aren't sure about by paying attention to the symbols used on the game board and on the player mats. The game flows really well, and there are definitely different ways to win (hence the 4X moniker: expand, exterminate, explore, exploit...you can focus on any of these and still have a fighting chance of winning). 

 

Some tips before you play: 

1) Read the rules ahead of time. I cannot stress this enough. EVERYONE going needs to do this. This will save you hours of time, and even if everyone is still shaky on the rules, you'll be able to easy work through the first few turns of the game much easier than you would if one person is just scratching their head.

 

2) While the game retails for $100, it's starting to drop down closer to $50 all of the time (Barnes and Noble put all of their copies on clearance about two months ago, where I picked my copy up for $50). If you keep an eye on the Board Game Geek "hot deals" forum, you're bound to see a sale soon. 

 

3) Is a rule not making sense? Check out the various threads here: http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/72125/eclipse

 

It's one of the best board games I've played, so I hope you get a chance to play it (especially over, gulp, something like Munchkin wink.png ).

 

 

 

Got back from CabinCon last night.  Saw some really cheesy movies (mainly a lot of shorts that my friend Troy finds from parts unknown), and played a lot of games that I hadn't played before.  Got introduced to Lords of Waterdeep, Dominion, and Memoir '44, all of which get a big thumbs up from me.  Revisited Inn Fighting, Chrononauts, and Munchkin (yes, I did purchase The Good, the Bad and the Munchkin for a few rousing rounds of Firefly Munchkin).  And while I thought long and hard about purchasing Eclipse, I ended up going in a different direction and ordered, for about the same price from Amazon, the anniversary edition of Galaxy Trucker (which included the base game and both expansions), which none of the other guys had played, and which became a fairly big hit once we played a few rounds.  All in all a good extended weekend of games and movies.

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Got back from CabinCon last night.  Saw some really cheesy movies (mainly a lot of shorts that my friend Troy finds from parts unknown), and played a lot of games that I hadn't played before.  Got introduced to Lords of Waterdeep, Dominion, and Memoir '44, all of which get a big thumbs up from me.  Revisited Inn Fighting, Chrononauts, and Munchkin (yes, I did purchase The Good, the Bad and the Munchkin for a few rousing rounds of Firefly Munchkin).  And while I thought long and hard about purchasing Eclipse, I ended up going in a different direction and ordered, for about the same price from Amazon, the anniversary edition of Galaxy Trucker (which included the base game and both expansions), which none of the other guys had played, and which became a fairly big hit once we played a few rounds.  All in all a good extended weekend of games and movies.

 

 

That sounds like a lot of fun, John. Sounds like you played some great games. And Galaxy Trucker is a good game, too! 

 

If you ever see the opportunity to play Eclipse, though, go for it.

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Lords of Waterdeep has a similar game mechanic as Agricola, but is far easier to set up, learn, and play. I like it a lot.

I also just got the chance to play King of Tokyo, which was a blast. A simple, quick, fun game that still has elements of strategy (and risk!).

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I'm new to the hobby of boardgaming and to this ongoing conversation. My interest in boardgaming started 4 or 5 years ago when some friends introduced us to Settlers of Catan. Somewhere along the way I downloaded the iPhone app for Ticket to Ride and I really enjoyed that, too. Last year I made a new friend who owns over 200 boardgames and it seemed like all the stars finally aligned and my interest in boardgaming had an opportunity to really flourish. Over the last six months, I've just fallen head over heels for this hobby.

 

Mostly, I've been playing a lot modern classics and some of the more popular "intro" games, including:

 

Dominion. I know, I know, this game is very mechanical and has no theme, etc., etc. but I've been hooked on this since I first played it. We own a couple of expansions and this hits the table quite a bit. 

 

Pandemic. My introduction to co-op games. Probably our (my wife and I) favorite game.

 

Evo (second edition). My introduction to a slightly more complicated type of game. Designed by the same guy who designed Small World. This game seems to force more combat than Small World does and it has a cool bidding mechanic, unfortunately it's out of print and hard (read: expensive) to acquire. Definitely on my wish list to own someday.

 

We've also been playing Lost Cities, Love Letter, King of Tokyo, Survive: Escape from Atlantis, Ticket to Ride, Citadels, Coloretto, and Small World.

 

I've started watching Tom Vasel's reviews and the videos by the Shut Up & Sit Down guys. I've joined Board Game Geek. I don't even know myself anymore!

 

I'm looking to add a heavier game to our collection soon. I was considering something like Power Grid. Any suggestions from you guys on a good heavier game to start with?

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You are speaking my language, Gavin

 

Love that you mentioned Tom Vasel. I don't watch his videos often, but the Dice Tower podcast is something I look forward to more than good television I enjoy. 

 

Power Grid is a great intro heavy game. It was my first "big" game, in fact! I think it's not too terribly difficult to learn, and there's enough depth that it's difficult to master. A lot of people say it's too "mathy," but, well, to each their own. 

 

I'd also recommend any of Stefan Feld's games, which are kind of in their own category since they're all of a piece. I haven't played them all, but know enough about them to get that I'd love the ones I haven't (yet) played. His most famous games are The Castles of BurgundyNotre DameIn the Year of the Dragon, and Trajan. He's also done Bora Bora (which seems to dropping in price significantly), Bruges, and the lovely looking Rialto (all released last year!). Feld's game are the epitome of Eurogame, with a variety of ways to get points and a somewhat pasted-on theme. That said, I do like Feld's integration of mechanics quite a bit, and there's enough difference between his games to keep things fresh.

 

This might be a stretch, but Eclipse is a good blend of Euro-style mechanics with American-style space combat. I really like the game! 

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I've been trying to get a group together to play board games, but it hasn't quite worked yet. I have done quite a bit of online Ticket to Ride. One of my online friends is super into board games. Power Grid is his favorite at the moment. 

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You are speaking my language, Gavin

 

Love that you mentioned Tom Vasel. I don't watch his videos often, but the Dice Tower podcast is something I look forward to more than good television I enjoy. 

 

Power Grid is a great intro heavy game. It was my first "big" game, in fact! I think it's not too terribly difficult to learn, and there's enough depth that it's difficult to master. A lot of people say it's too "mathy," but, well, to each their own. 

 

I'd also recommend any of Stefan Feld's games, which are kind of in their own category since they're all of a piece. I haven't played them all, but know enough about them to get that I'd love the ones I haven't (yet) played. His most famous games are The Castles of BurgundyNotre DameIn the Year of the Dragon, and Trajan. He's also done Bora Bora (which seems to dropping in price significantly), Bruges, and the lovely looking Rialto (all released last year!). Feld's game are the epitome of Eurogame, with a variety of ways to get points and a somewhat pasted-on theme. That said, I do like Feld's integration of mechanics quite a bit, and there's enough difference between his games to keep things fresh.

 

This might be a stretch, but Eclipse is a good blend of Euro-style mechanics with American-style space combat. I really like the game! 

 

Thanks, Jason. I've heard of Feld but haven't played any of his games. I'm definitely interested in The Castles of Burgundy after doing some research on it. I love games that have multiple paths to victory and it looks like that one is firmly in that category.

 

I'm also thinking seriously about Ghost Stories right now. My wife and I love cooperative games and I wanted something in the horror genre that was challenging but not as long as something like Arkham Horror. Looks like Ghost Stories checks all those boxes.

 

As for Power Grid I might put that on the back burner for the moment. I heard it's not great with only 2 players (unlike the two I just mentioned, again, according to what I've heard). While we do have some friends we play games with somewhat regularly, my primary gaming partner is my wife and so I'm not sure I want to start building our collection with games that don't work well with 2 players. Any comments on Power Grid as a 2 player game?

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Thanks, Jason. I've heard of Feld but haven't played any of his games. I'm definitely interested in The Castles of Burgundy after doing some research on it. I love games that have multiple paths to victory and it looks like that one is firmly in that category.

 

I'm also thinking seriously about Ghost Stories right now. My wife and I love cooperative games and I wanted something in the horror genre that was challenging but not as long as something like Arkham Horror. Looks like Ghost Stories checks all those boxes.

 

As for Power Grid I might put that on the back burner for the moment. I heard it's not great with only 2 players (unlike the two I just mentioned, again, according to what I've heard). While we do have some friends we play games with somewhat regularly, my primary gaming partner is my wife and so I'm not sure I want to start building our collection with games that don't work well with 2 players. Any comments on Power Grid as a 2 player game?

 

 

 

I haven't played Power Grid as a two-player game, but I will say that a lot of the challenge comes from the number of players. So, it seems like it wouldn't be ideal.

 

Ghost Stories is probably a better pick than Arkham Horror, but don't totally rule out the latter. I'd maybe try playing it with a handful of people who know the rules. The game can take a long time, but I've played a number of games in 90 to 120 minute timeframe with one or two people. It really depends on how quickly you make decisions. 

 

A possible recommendation is Fantasy Flight's Lord of the Rings Living Card Game. It's 1-4 players, cooperative, and plays best with one or two. It's also a game that plays just fine with no expansions, though the door is open to expand like crazy if it's something you want to do. I play a lot of this game these days, since it's easy for me to sit down and play by myself for 45 minutes. FFG releases new material for all of their LCGs on a regular basis, so the game is well supported. 

 

For crunchy two-player games, maybe check out Twilight Struggle or 1960: The Making of a President some day? There's plenty of praise out there about these games. I'm not a super-fan, but they're games I'm always trying to get people to play. (The theme always pushes some away, for some reasons, especially for the latter.) Very challenging games, though, and ones that have a surprisingly graspable learning curve.  

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Well, we added Ghost Stories and the relatively new 2-player game Targi to our collection this week. We broke them in last night. Targi was a blast, it features sort of a lite worker placement mechanic and a set collection mechanic. Some good ideas combined in an interesting ways by first-time designer Andreas Steiger Seems like it'll be good for a lot of plays for my wife and I when we want something a tad heavier (it takes 45-60 minutes to play).

 

And then we played Ghost Stories. And that game is HAAAARRRRD. But it was fun. We're getting to where we can spank Pandemic (without the expansions) even on harder difficulties. It will be a long time, if ever, before we can spank Ghost Stories.

 

Pretty excited about these two.

 

Next two I've got my eye on: Quantum and Arctic Scavengers. Both of which we're brought to my attention by the wonderful board game website, Shut Up & Sit Down. 

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Andrew   

Thanks for the Pandemic and Ghost Stories recommendations, gents.  I bought them a couple of weeks ago, for some indoor non-video game related fun for my 13 year old son and me.  We're digging both of them, and I very much appreciate the cooperative aspect of these games; good dad and son bonding time.  Next stop, I think we'll check out Arkham Horror - he likes creepy stuff, and I dug Lovecraft as a teen, so it seems like the way to go.

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This weekend, I got the chance to play a game in its last prototype phase - Island Dice - which will launch its Kickstarter in June 2014. It's a fun game with a huge potential for wildly divergent strategies. Even better - the designer gave me one of his two prototypes to bring to my local game store and do some play testing with it. Ya!

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Thanks for the Pandemic and Ghost Stories recommendations, gents.  I bought them a couple of weeks ago, for some indoor non-video game related fun for my 13 year old son and me.  We're digging both of them, and I very much appreciate the cooperative aspect of these games; good dad and son bonding time.  Next stop, I think we'll check out Arkham Horror - he likes creepy stuff, and I dug Lovecraft as a teen, so it seems like the way to go.

 

Glad you're digging them, Andrew! For what it's worth, Arkham Horror plays really well with two.

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Thanks for the Pandemic and Ghost Stories recommendations, gents.  I bought them a couple of weeks ago, for some indoor non-video game related fun for my 13 year old son and me.  We're digging both of them, and I very much appreciate the cooperative aspect of these games; good dad and son bonding time.  Next stop, I think we'll check out Arkham Horror - he likes creepy stuff, and I dug Lovecraft as a teen, so it seems like the way to go.

 

Glad you're digging them, Andrew! For what it's worth, Arkham Horror plays really well with two.

 

 

Glad y'all are enjoying those games. My wife and I have played Ghost Stories maybe half a dozen times and finally won a game! Felt rewarding in a way that most games don't.

 

I'll certainly defer to Jason re: Arkham Horror but if I were to pick today, I'd probably buy Eldritch Horror over Arkham Horror (I've never played either of them, though). Eldritch Horror is the new kid on the block, sort of a loose sequel(?) to Arkham, I think. I've heard Eldritch is shorter in length than Arkham (180 minutes vs 240 minutes, according to Board Game Geek) and I've heard Eldritch Horror fixes a few of the issues that some folks had with Arkham Horror. But, again, this is from someone who hasn't played either game. Jason have you played Eldritch? What do you think?

This weekend, I got the chance to play a game in its last prototype phase - Island Dice - which will launch its Kickstarter in June 2014. It's a fun game with a huge potential for wildly divergent strategies. Even better - the designer gave me one of his two prototypes to bring to my local game store and do some play testing with it. Ya!

 

Looks cool, thanks for sharing. I love dice games.

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Andrew   

As luck would have it, the game store in Asheville was out of Arkham Horror, so I ended up purchasing Eldritch Horror instead.  The store clerk agreed with your take, Gavin, saying that Eldritch had ironed out a few significant flaws to be found in Arkham.

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As luck would have it, the game store in Asheville was out of Arkham Horror, so I ended up purchasing Eldritch Horror instead.  The store clerk agreed with your take, Gavin, saying that Eldritch had ironed out a few significant flaws to be found in Arkham.

 

I haven't played Eldrich, so I can't comment in detail. The biggest difference is the setting: Arkham Horror (and its expansions) are focused just on the town of Arkham itself, as well as the surrounding areas (which come up in the various expansions). Eldrich Horror covers the whole globe. I really like the in-depth nature of Arkham (it's almost like a lite roleplaying game)...I wonder if Eldrich is a little lighter in the rules department?

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Over the weekend, Gavin introduced me to a number of board and card games, several of which I loved (Small World, Love Letter, Dominion) and a couple of which I merely liked (King of Tokyo in particular, I guess). My favorite, actually, was Smash Up; I'd be curious to know what some of the more seasoned gamers here think of that one, which I happily admit is a pretty silly (but addictive) little game.

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Over the weekend, Gavin introduced me to a number of board and card games, several of which I loved (Small World, Love Letter, Dominion) and a couple of which I merely liked (King of Tokyo in particular, I guess). My favorite, actually, was Smash Up; I'd be curious to know what some of the more seasoned gamers here think of that one, which I happily admit is a pretty silly (but addictive) little game.

 

I haven't played Smash Up, Josh, but everything I've heard/read about it makes it sound like a lot of fun.

 

Over the weekend I got to play Mystery at the Abbey, a game I've owned for about seven years and only played once. It's a deduction game, and each player tries to figure out who killed a monk in a medieval monastery. The process of eliminating possible suspects is a lot of fun, and the flavorful mechanics--having to return to the chapel for Mass every four turns, invoking the "vow of silence" to avoid answering other players' questions, and so on--really add to it. 

 

We also played Innovation, a game my wife and I have played quite a bit this past year. It's a card based game that has some really interesting mechanics in it. It's rough around the edges, in some ways, and the art (which is JUST simple graphic designs) might turn some off. But I think it's one of the best games of the past five or so years. Check it out if you have a chance. 

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Over the weekend, Gavin introduced me to a number of board and card games, several of which I loved (Small World, Love Letter, Dominion) and a couple of which I merely liked (King of Tokyo in particular, I guess). My favorite, actually, was Smash Up; I'd be curious to know what some of the more seasoned gamers here think of that one, which I happily admit is a pretty silly (but addictive) little game.

 

Before Josh loses any street cred for claiming to "merely like" King of Tokyo, let me just jump in and say that he used a somewhat risky play style which resulted in him getting eliminated and sitting on the sidelines for much of the two games we played. And, while I love KoT, my least favorite thing about it is player elimination but I see how it's necessary and, thankfully, the game usually doesn't last too long so it's not like someone is sitting out for an hour or anything.

 

As for Smash Up, until you are somewhat familiar with the factions the game can be a little confusing and frustrating but once you have a feel for how each one plays it becomes immensely fun and addictive. Case in point, my dear wife played only her second game last night (and won!) and then informed me in no uncertain terms that she doesn't like Smash Up. She promised she'd give it a few more plays and I hope she begins to enjoy it more.

 

As for what I've else I've been playing lately...

 

(Some of these I've purchased, others I've played from a friend's collection):

 

The Castles of Burgundy is our latest acquisition and after only two plays my wife and I are pretty enamored with it and my wife even declared it might become her favorite game of all time. It's amazing how balanced the game is, in both games my wife and I have used different strategies and we always end up within a few points of each other (I won the first game and she won the second). I can certainly see how many folks would not enjoy this since, as one reviewer said, it looks like a math textbook and a piece of motel art had a baby, but we will definitely be checking out more games from Stefan Feld soon. I'm thinking Rialto, as our next one maybe... (Thanks for the recommendation, Jason!)

 

Quantum. Dice + Space = Awesome. A simple game with some surprising depth. The modular board and command cards make every game a bit different. Lots of replay value here, I think.

 

Arctic Scavengers feels like, in some ways, the meridian of the deck-building genre. I'm not saying it's the best but it's probably the most tense and cut-throat that the genre will ever get. At the end of the day, I still prefer the elegance and simplicity of Dominion but I'm very glad that AS is right there for when I want bluffing, combat, and deck-building all covered in a thick layer of thematic ice.

 

Libertalia. Citadels was one of the first real games that I played and ever since then I've been pretty interested in games that feature secret role selection. This game takes that idea to the extreme giving each player a deck of 30 character cards with different special abilities. It's not as chaotic as it might sound since you only have 9 of those character cards for each of the game's three rounds. Still, it's a fun and often funny game.

 

Cascassonne/Metro. Finally got to play these two classics several days ago and they didn't disappoint us. The biggest flaw in our collection right now is the absence of a tile-laying game. I'd love to get Metro if it were still in print and easier (cheaper!) to acquire. But looks like Carcassonne or maybe the newer Indigo will have to take its place. Any other tile-laying games I should check out? Tsuro?

 

Hanabi. After a handful of plays this jumped into my top ten games and made me an unabashed Antoine Bauza fan. Plays well with 2 and 4. I want to bring it out every time I get a chance.

 

Forbidden Island. This little Pandemic-lite is great for families but don't be fooled, it's no pushover. I've lost more than I've won. My most memorable loss occurring this weekend with Mr. Hurst in which there was only one tile left at the end of the game -- Fool's Landing -- but, sadly, we were one treasure short of nabbing victory.

Edited by Gavin Breeden

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Over the weekend, Gavin introduced me to a number of board and card games, several of which I loved (Small World, Love Letter, Dominion) and a couple of which I merely liked (King of Tokyo in particular, I guess). My favorite, actually, was Smash Up; I'd be curious to know what some of the more seasoned gamers here think of that one, which I happily admit is a pretty silly (but addictive) little game.

 

Before Josh loses any street cred for claiming to "merely like" King of Tokyo, let me just jump in and say that he used a somewhat risky play style which resulted in him getting eliminated and sitting on the sidelines for much of the two games we played. And, while I love KoT, my least favorite thing about it is player elimination but I see how it's necessary and, thankfully, the game usually doesn't last too long so it's not like someone is sitting out for an hour or anything.

 

 

The fact that I fared poorly in it isn't why I dislike it, necessarily-- or, I should say, I understand that it was my fault more than it was the game's!-- but I feel like it's a game where there's not really much to think about or strategize about when it's not your turn, so I wasn't quite as sucked into it as I was some of the others. But again: I did like the game!

 

PS-- Sorry to hear about your Smash Up woes, GB.

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Over the weekend, Gavin introduced me to a number of board and card games, several of which I loved (Small World, Love Letter, Dominion) and a couple of which I merely liked (King of Tokyo in particular, I guess). My favorite, actually, was Smash Up; I'd be curious to know what some of the more seasoned gamers here think of that one, which I happily admit is a pretty silly (but addictive) little game.

 

Before Josh loses any street cred for claiming to "merely like" King of Tokyo, let me just jump in and say that he used a somewhat risky play style which resulted in him getting eliminated and sitting on the sidelines for much of the two games we played. And, while I love KoT, my least favorite thing about it is player elimination but I see how it's necessary and, thankfully, the game usually doesn't last too long so it's not like someone is sitting out for an hour or anything.

 

 

The fact that I fared poorly in it isn't why I dislike it, necessarily-- or, I should say, I understand that it was my fault more than it was the game's!-- but I feel like it's a game where there's not really much to think about or strategize about when it's not your turn, so I wasn't quite as sucked into it as I was some of the others. But again: I did like the game!

 

PS-- Sorry to hear about your Smash Up woes, GB.

 

 

That is actually a fair criticism of the game, one I think Quintin Smith of SU&SD shares with you about KoT. There are some cards which give you certain powers, etc. that do give you more to do between your turns but since it's a dice game, there's always going to be more luck than strategy.

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The activity in this thread (and the D&D Next one) makes me so happy!

 

It's good to see that Hanabi and Castles of Burgundy play well with two players, since it's getting more and more difficult for me to play with anybody but my wife. I keep trying to get her to play Android, though my pleading hasn't worked....yet.

 

As for tile-laying games, Carcassonne is my go-to. Some of the expansions are a lot of fun, too—Inns & Cathedrals as well as Traders & Builders. (And some expansions are total garbage.)

 

Speaking of expansions, one of the things I like best about Arkham Horror are how good some of the expansions are. The base game is fine (and, as several people have mentioned, flawed), yet the expansions add some fantastic flavor to what's already there. Innsmouth Horror adds a really thematic neighboring city (from one of my favorite Lovecraft stories), and adds one of my favorite bits ever in a board game: personal goals for all of the characters. So in addition to just trying to win, the various characters have other goals (avenge someone's death, sacrifice themselves to save the rest, and so on). Plus some of the smaller expansions add great little mechanics or story arcs. Trying to play with all of them is a fool's errand, but by combining one big box and one small box expansion, you can get a lot of memorable game experiences.

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Got in some board-game goodness this holiday weekend.

 

Played some Battlestar: Galactica with friends. We've played this some in the past, but it's been at least a year since I've played and they play with a couple of new expansions that add some more options that I think are quite neat and make things a bit more dynamic. I really love this game. The whole secret traitor aspect added with the co-op survival resource management playing field makes for a game where you have to play the game and play the people. The first game basically came down to a roll. I had to get a 5 or higher on a d8. Got an 8. Felt pretty boss. 

 

Also played Settlers of Catan with family. It's probably the most popular of the more "serious" board games, but I haven't played quite enough of it to know what I think of it yet. Maybe it's just me, but it seems like bricks are way too precious in the early game. You really need bricks to build roads to expand and if someone can't get bricks, it seems like they'll always land in last place. This was my first time playing with 5 people and due to some funky board placement, we had two sets of two-hex bricks sets right by each other that everyone built around.

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Last weekend, I played Tsuro of the Seas for the first time, and loved it. It was beautifully simple, and well-crafted. Lots of fun. Anyone else tried it?

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