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John Drew

Stephen King's IT

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Cary Fukunaga, director of Sin Nombre and last year's Jane Eyre, has been attached to direct a 2 part adaptation of the Stephen King novel.

 

Story from The Hollywood Reporter here.

Edited by John Drew

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Interesting. So now instead of remaking/rebooting films that aren't even 25 years old, Hollywood is redoing TV miniseries? I remember watching the TV miniseries and rather liking it, although by 1990 I was starting to watch less and less television. I was in college, which probably explains much of that trend.

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Is it really a "redo" of the miniseries, or a subsequent adaptation of King's novel? Intertextually these questions are interesting as I delve more and more into adaptation studies.

Never saw the whole thing (the original miniseries with Tim Curry as Pennywise), but that was probably because I already had a phobia of clowns as a child. Can't imagine the miniseries holds up too well, but along with THE STAND, IT is an interesting (and terrifying) enough idea that it probably isn't a terrible idea to remake this. Cary Fukunaga is an interesting choice. I rather liked JANE EYRE. Never saw SIN NOMBRE.

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adaptation studies.

I didn't know that was a thing.

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Is it really a "redo" of the miniseries, or a subsequent adaptation of King's novel? Intertextually these questions are interesting as I delve more and more into adaptation studies.

Good question. "Subsequent adaptation" sounds about right.

Never saw the whole thing (the original miniseries with Tim Curry as Pennywise), but that was probably because I already had a phobia of clowns as a child. Can't imagine the miniseries holds up too well, but along with THE STAND, IT is an interesting (and terrifying) enough idea that it probably isn't a terrible idea to remake this. Cary Fukunaga is an interesting choice. I rather liked JANE EYRE. Never saw SIN NOMBRE.

Oh, in case I wasn't clear, I'm certainly interested in seeing what the filmmaker does with this material. I wasn't too thrilled with JANE EYRE, but there were things about I liked.

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adaptation studies.

I didn't know that was a thing.

Oh, it definitely is. In film studies the foundational work was George Bluestone's book on the relation between film and literature, but it's become much more than that. Film adaptation is often defined as the extended revisitation of a work in one medium within the medium of cinema. See the work of Robert Stam, Linda Hutcheon, Thomas Leitch in particular. Some of the common questions are issues of intermediality (the citation of different media within a work). I think the issue of citationality is an interesting one. What is it that makes something an adaptation? What is "citable?" How does each medium shape content in specific ways?

The biggest revelation for me was how the question of "fidelity" has fallen into disrepute. With many of the texts we need to think about what the goal of adaptation is. Is it the recreation of meaning or an aesthetic experience in another medium? Anyway, it's something that I think needs to be thought about a lot more when I think back on some of the threads on A&F (not to bring back a bone of contention, but the reactions to CHILDREN OF MEN strike me as something I'd like to look at again).

Edited by Anders

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The plan is to start shooting next summer.

 

A bit more on the two-movie structure:

 

 

“The book is so epic that we couldn’t tell it all in one movie and service the characters with enough depth,” explained Lin; the first film, then, will be a coming-of-age story about the children tormented by It, while the second will skip ahead in time as those same characters band together to continue the fight as adults. Though Fukunaga is only committed to directing the first film, Lin says the in-demand helmer is currently closing a deal to co-write the second.

And no one is more excited about the project’s renewed movement than It’s author. “The most important thing is that Stephen King gave us his blessing,” said Lin. “We didn’t want to make this unless he felt it was the right way to go, and when we sent him the script, the response that Cary got back was, ‘Go with God, please! This is the version the studio should make.’ So that was really gratifying.”

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After the more horrific parts of True Detective, I think this director can do IT justice.

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I hope they don't stick too closely to the book. The book has its moments, but it tanks hard in the final act.

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Will Poulter as Pennywise?

 

Since the original novel ran at about 900 pages and spanned several decades, the plan is for New Line to shoot one movie focusing on the protagonists as kids and another focusing on them as adults. Fukunaga has scripts for both ready, with Poulter appearing in both films, making him the star of the project.
Edited by NBooth

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Time to amend the thread title.

 

 

Cary Fukunaga is out as the director of New Line’s two-part adaptation of Stephen King‘s “It,” which will not move forward as planned this summer and has been pushed indefinitely, multiple individuals familiar with the situation have told TheWrap.

Insiders tell TheWrap that “True Detective” director Fukunaga repeatedly clashed with the studio and did not want to compromise his artistic vision in the wake of budget cuts that were recently demanded by New Line, which greenlit the first film at $30 million. The situation came to a head over Memorial Day weekend, leading to Fukunaga’s abrupt exit from the ambitious project.

“It” was originally set up at Warner Bros. before moving to New Line in recent weeks, which was one reason behind the unfortunate split. Shooting locations were another issue at the heart of the departure, with Fukunaga expressing a strong desire to film in New York, which is more expensive than other locales. Another source indicated that New Line was getting cold feet about the project in the wake of the less-than-stellar opening of “Poltergeist,” which featured a clown in its marketing materials.

 

The story also mentions Fukunaga wanted Ben Mendelsohn to play Pennywise. Hard to imagine how he and Will Poulter could be up for the same part.

Edited by Tyler

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Posted (edited)

MTV has a new trailer.

Edited by NBooth

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