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Tyler

Alien: Covenant (Was Alien: Paradise Lost / Prometheus 2)

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So, presumably someone you know has been killed in a horrid fashion.  So to grieve, you hit the showers--you know, wash away the pain. Oh, and get some with the other guy who's also washing away his sorrows with a good rinse.  And of course your shower doesn't have any walls--it's just a big tunnel that goes off into darkness.  Darkness, conveniently, where the nasty thing who has just eaten a few of your colleagues is waiting to eat one of you two who decided the best and most effective way to handle a crisis is to get some nookie.  Only this time, it's not a freak in a hockey mask punishing you for having sex, it's a xenomorph, who predictively allows the cameraman to get a good view first, then sprays blood all over your boobs in an aesthetic manner while you figure out how to fight it off naked, saving your vengeance for a later, more clothed, chance. Can. Not. Wait.

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For what it's worth, one of the actors has said that the colony ship in this film is populated by "couples". So I'm not sure the sex is as casual as "getting some" would imply.

But yeah, this does not look good. And by that I mean it does not look good *as a sequel to Prometheus*, let alone as a prequel to Alien.

One of the things that irritates me about prequels is the way they're always trying to up the ante -- make the villains look *more* powerful, *more* horrific -- even though it means that, if you watch the movies chronologically, everything will look *less* impressive as time goes on. Hence Rogue One ups the trooper ante by giving us "death troopers" -- troopers that Darth Vader never bothers to use in the original trilogy, apparently preferring the regular stormtroopers instead. And hence Alien: Covenant gives us an alien bursting through someone's *spine*, etc, etc., etc.

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Given that SXSW is doing a retro screening of Alien with Scott, Fassbender, and McBride  in attendance, I'm wondering if this will be the advertised "Secret Screening"?

P.S. Hmmm...and they just added Franco's Disaster Artist to the Midnigher's Screening, so 

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This still looks stupid and unnecessarily convoluted.  

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5 hours ago, Buckeye Jones said:

This still looks stupid and unnecessarily convoluted.  

Is it just me, or does this strangely feel like one of those 1980's Roger Corman ALIEN knockoffs (Galaxy of Terror, Forbidden World, Creature, etc.) on steroids, rather than a continuation of the original?

Edited by John Drew

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I just love how, in Prometheus, the characters took their helmets off in an alien atmosphere without a thought for whether there might be any airborne viruses or something, and now, in Covenant, these characters are walking around and stepping on spore-releasing objects and they're *still* breathing the open air as though nothing could go wrong.

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Time for another prologue ... though I think this one might actually be part of the new film. Suffice it to say that I wonder what Jon Spaihts and Damon Lindelof make of the way that Sir Ridley seems to be discarding the basic concept that Prometheus was built around. (I read somewhere that Sir Ridley had apparently said, in reference to the fans, something like, "They want aliens? I'll give them f--ing aliens!" In other words, if the fans were upset that Prometheus had all this stuff about Engineers and almost nothing in the way of Xenomorphs, then Alien: Covenant is going to swing hard in the other direction.)

 

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Evan C   

Is it necessary to see Prometheus to fully understand this? Or is there not that much worth understanding?

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Anders   
10 minutes ago, Evan C said:

Is it necessary to see Prometheus to fully understand this? Or is there not that much worth understanding?

You should just see PROMETHEUS cuz it's worth seeing.

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Tyler   

Nothing in Covenant is nearly as bad as Prometheus's worst moments, but Covenant's good parts were never as memorable or engaging as Prometheus's, either.

On 5/18/2017 at 1:10 PM, Evan C said:

Is it necessary to see Prometheus to fully understand this? Or is there not that much worth understanding?

I'd say you can you figure it out without much trouble, although there is a stronger connection between the two than I was expecting.

 

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*** SPOILERS GALORE, PEOPLE ***

*** I'M WARNING YOU ***

*** SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS ***

*** LAST CHANCE TO LOOK AWAY ***

*** OKAY, THEN. ***

So, ugh.

Prometheus was the story of Elizabeth Shaw and her quest to reconcile science and faith. It was also the story of the Engineers, who created humanity (if not life itself) on Earth eons ago and then decided to destroy humanity 2,000 years ago. It ended with Elizabeth departing for the Engineers' homeworld in a bid to learn *why* they did what they did.

And now, Alien: Covenant, the sequel to that film, basically says, "Fuck all that."

Before the movie has even begun -- though we don't learn this until some point in the middle of the movie, of course -- Elizabeth and all the Engineers are dead. And at no point does anyone (*anyone*) ever address the question regarding *why* the Engineers tried to wipe out humanity 2,000 years ago. The back-story -- heck, the *story* -- that Jon Spaihts and Damon Lindelof whipped up for the first movie has been completely tossed aside. (And then the film goes ahead and borrows its entire plot premise from Spaihts' script for Passengers!)

The genocide of the Engineers makes little sense, of course. What, we're supposed to believe that a spacefaring species millions of years old was wiped out by a bunch of bombs dropped in one city? Or even by a bunch of viruses that spread over a single planet? There are no Engineers on other planets, or in spaceships, somewhere out there, keeping track of what's been going on back at the homeworld? No Engineers who might come *back* to their homeworld to see what's happened? Come to that, why *did* the Engineers abandon their attempt to wipe out humanity 2,000 years ago, after a black-goo outbreak destroyed a single starship's crew? Who *made* the decision to destroy humanity, the Engineers back on the homeworld or the Engineers manning the military-lab planet? When the Engineers back home lost contact with the military-lab staff, why did none of them go back to that planet to see what had happened?

Then there's the "shrinking world syndrome" element, whereby we learn that one of Weyland-Yutani's androids actually *created* the Xenomorphs that we saw in the original Alien movies, through a form of genetic engineering etc. Again, this only works if you toss out the previous film entirely. Not that Prometheus was entirely consistent on this point, mind you. In his audio commentary, Damon Lindelof says the "deacon" at the end of Prometheus -- the alien that pops out of the Engineer's chest -- *could* be an ancestor of the aliens that we saw in the original films. Otherwise, y'know, why end the movie with that scene? But that doesn't make much sense, because the bas-relief artwork in the Engineers' "temple" (or military warehouse, or whatever it was) actually *showed* the Xenomorphs (and even the Alien Queen, if I'm not mistaken) -- so one would assume that the Xenomorphs had been part of the Engineers' arsenal for thousands of years before the events of these films. But now? Alien: Covenant tosses all that aside and says, "Actually, David created them. And we humans created David. So we're kind of like the Xenomorphs' grandparents, aren't we?"

I find myself thinking about the increasingly anti-scientific approach of these films. The original Alien hinged on a violation of quarantine procedures -- everyone wore spacesuits in the alien atmosphere and there was never any question of exposing oneself to that environment, and Ripley tried to *prevent* any foreign lifeforms from getting onto the ship. Then Prometheus showed characters wearing spacesuits on a planet with a toxic atmosphere, but after they discover breathable air inside the Engineers' lair, the characters start happily taking their helmets off -- as though there wouldn't be any microbes or viruses to worry about. And now, in Alien: Covenant? I don't recall hearing *anyone* talk about atmospheric conditions -- they just walk off the ship, breathe in the air, and get infected by spores. Because *of course they do*! (As Walter Chaw puts it, the original Alien was about what happens when people err for their friends' sake, whereas Prometheus and Covenant are about what happens to idiots.)

The original Alien started with a script by Dan O'Bannon and Ron Shusett. (O'Bannon came up with the basic storyline, but Shusett came up with the facehugger/chestburster combo, when O'Bannon was struggling to figure out how the alien should get on board the ship.) The script was then re-written by David Giler and Walter Hill, who added the android character, and O'Bannon never stopped complaining about what he saw as the pointless changes to his story (though Shusett, I believe, liked the addition of the android). With Covenant, we have a film in which the androids have finally taken over the asylum (and look! they're named David and Walter, just like the guys who re-wrote O'Bannon's script!). I wonder what O'Bannon would have made of this. (O'Bannon died in 2009. Shusett is still alive, though; he's 82 this year.)

It's interesting that Walter, we are told, is a version of David that has had some of its creativity and autonomy removed, because the creativity and autonomy that the *David* model had was scary to humans. Aliens -- the second film -- similarly introduced an android that was supposed to be an "improved" version of the android from the first film (it had safety features built in that would prevent it from ever harming a human), yet *that* android (i.e. Bishop) was warm and empathetic in a way that Walter is not.

I'm kind of glad I saw Blade Runner again last week, as prep for watching this film. That film, like this film, begins with a tight close-up on an eyeball (which I remembered from earlier viewings). And that film, like this one, features a same-sex kiss followed by an act of violence (which I had forgotten until I saw the film again last week).

I do appreciate that the Lawrence of Arabia allusions in Prometheus haven't been *entirely* forgotten. There's a scene in which David sings "I'm the man who broke the bank of Monte Carlo" while cutting his hair (i.e. while cutting off the hair that he had bleached blonde after becoming obsessed with Lawrence of Arabia).

Guy Pearce has now joined Max von Sydow (The Exorcist, Exorcist II: The Heretic) and Ian McDiarmid (Return of the Jedi, the Star Wars prequels) on the list of actors who wore old-age makeup throughout one film, and then went on to play more or less their own ages in the follow-up films (via prequel or flashback).

In Aliens, Carter Burke sent the colony at Acheron a message dated "6/12/79" (June 12, I assume, and not December 6?), and that was "57 years" after the events of the first film. So the first film took place in '22. 2122, maybe? Alien: Covenant takes place in 2104, eleven years after Prometheus, which took place circa Christmas 2093. So Alien: Covenant takes place only 18 years before the original Alien, and it ends with a ship heading for a planet that is still 7 years away.

Since we now "know" that the classic Xenomorph species was essentially created by David, I guess we'll need another film to bring back the Engineers so that one of them can get infected by David's creation and end up on that planet where the Nostromo found it in the original movie. Or maybe we'll find out it was *David* inside the Space Jockey outfit all this time.

More thoughts later, if any occur to me.

ETA: Oh, right. One comparison that some people have been making -- so we might as well make it here, too -- is that this film basically does to Prometheus what Alien3 did to Aliens. Except it doesn't *tell* you that it's done that until much later in the movie.

ETA: Oh, and how exactly is plant life supposed to survive for *ten years* on a planet where all the animals have been wiped out?

I missed one Blade Runner reference: when an android shouts "That's the spirit" after being stabbed with something.

Once again, a Ridley Scott movie features a decapitated head (two, if you count the statue that gets its head knocked off).

MAY 20 ETA: I just remembered, the Engineers are *waving* to David's ship when he arrives on their homeworld, right? Which is stupid. As a friend points out, don't the Engineers know what *kind* of ship this is? (Maybe they might even recognize that it's 2,000 years old?) Did they bother to contact the pilot at all before letting him get near the planet? David commits his act of genocide way, way too easily.

Meanwhile, Michael Fassbender once again plays someone who believes that humans should die out; I half-expected him to say that he and Walter were "gods among insects", like the Ian McKellen version of Magneto did in the second X-Men movie.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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7 hours ago, Peter T Chattaway said:

*** SPOILERS GALORE, PEOPLE ***

*** I'M WARNING YOU ***

*** SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS ***

*** LAST CHANCE TO LOOK AWAY ***

*** OKAY, THEN. ***

So, ugh.

Prometheus was the story of Elizabeth Shaw and her quest to reconcile science and faith. It was also the story of the Engineers, who created humanity (if not life itself) on Earth eons ago and then decided to destroy humanity 2,000 years ago. It ended with Elizabeth departing for the Engineers' homeworld in a bid to learn *why* they did what they did.

And now, Alien: Covenant, the sequel to that film, basically says, "Fuck all that."

 

Thank you for this, Peter.

It pretty much articulates all I feel/felt but couldn't rouse myself to articulate beyond the "So, ugh."

P.S. I disagree with Kermode in this: I think Scott an exceedingly poor world-builder. At least, if by world-builder we mean something in a mythopoeic sense. He has a great eye for art-design and visual details, which can pass for world building but isn't quite the same thing. 

Edited by kenmorefield

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Major Spoilers for various Alien films, including Covenant. 

 

 

Earlier this year I complained that Guardians of the Galaxy was nihilistic. The dismissal of Elzabeth Shaw, who had neither the attachment of development of Ripley reminded me of the dismissal of Newt -- and eventual dismissal of Ripley-- in Alien3. 

Certainly that speaks to one weakness the franchise has always had: character development. I rewatched Prometheus a few days ago and my first comment was, "Wow, I forgot Charlize Theron was even in this movie."

I've long said, tongue only half in cheek, that I've always treated Alien3 and Alien Resurrection as the dreams Ripley had in hyper-sleep, akin to the TV show Dallas's attempt to negate a storyline they didn't want to live with. My complaint was not just that the explanation did violence to character continuity -- would Ripley really get into hyper-space without checking for stowaway and where in any of the movies has the xenomorph been able to cloak itself from mechanical detection? (If the xenomorph is more parasite and less sentient race, what level of consciousness does it have to have to even understand "avoiding detection"?  

Beyond that though, I hated the way the explanation of Alien3 rendered Aliens...pointless. It's impossible for me to go back and watch Aliens--I've tried--and enjoy it without just thinking, "well, yeah, nobody is coming out alive, they all died...and not subsequently, as a result of actions they took or didn't in this movie." It would be akin to a the characters walking off into the sunrise in A Man Escaped only to get hit by a bus. Worse than that, since that would be random. It would be like those characters celebrating their escape in a crowded bar by saying, "Hey, let's meet at the resistance hideway on 123 Fleur Street!!!"

I remember thinking when Covenant made the exposition about what happened to Shaw, so we're back to Ripley, sort of, being the only human that has ever survived an Alien encounter and escaped. (Although she did not survive the encounter in Aliens, she did survive in Alien, and the encounter in Aliens was a separate encounter.) I don't exactly need a happy ending, but as a franchise, isn't the connecting tissue of Alien that *everybody* dies. That's it, that's all. I get how that's supposed to make things scarier, because it brings into play, allegedly, extinction rather than just death, but in another sense fear is about suspense, and if the outcome is predetermined (see Planet of the Apes reboot) there is little real fear. It's just all about the cleverness and creativity with which new bodies (I won't even say characters) are ground up into human sausages. 

Aliens has always been my favorite of the franchise. I just think Cameron better at embedding human emotion within large scale action. But I get why people prefer Alien. Watching it for the first time in many years at SXSW where Scott introduced scenes of Covenant, I was struck by what it has that has largely been missing from Alien movies ever sense. Dread. Where does dread come from? A sense of what might happen but is not inevitable. Nothing in Covenant induces dread (or horror, for me), because none of these people rise above the level of avatars. In the abstract, the human race and its survival is at stake, but only, ever, always, in the abstract. Ripley was the last true human in the Alien verse.

Edited by kenmorefield

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NBooth   

Huh. I actually thought this one was an improvement on Prometheus in that, at least, it's not boring. I enjoyed the planet exploration and Fassbender was loads of fun. 

The actual stuff with the alien, though, was boring in the extreme. I think the movie could have been improved simply by excising that. 

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kenmorefield wrote:
: . . . would Ripley really get into hyper-space without checking for stowaway . . .

Yes, EXACTLY. Plus, the Alien Queen left its ovipositor *behind* when it pursued Ripley and Newt. I'm not sure it would have been even physically *possible* for the Alien Queen to lay new eggs (two of them!) in the brief, brief time that it was on the ship.

: If the xenomorph is more parasite and less sentient race, what level of consciousness does it have to have to even understand "avoiding detection"?  

FWIW, we did see the Alien Queen pushing an elevator button in Aliens. And there's that scene where one of the marines says the Xenomorphs have cut the power, and Hudson yells, "How could they cut the power, man? They're animals!" So there's some ambiguity on that point in the earlier films.

: Nothing in Covenant induces dread (or horror, for me), because none of these people rise above the level of avatars.

Exactly. I had zero interest in these characters, which might be a first, for me, with an Alien film (not counting the Alien vs Predator cross-over movies; though I'm also not fond of Alien Resurrection, its status as a test run for Firefly notwithstanding).

NBooth wrote:
: Huh. I actually thought this one was an improvement on Prometheus in that, at least, it's not boring.

Prometheus had engaging visuals and music. (The opening credits alone lure me in every time I watch the film.) This film had little to none of that, except for the bits, music-wise, that it explicitly steals from Alien and Prometheus.

Let's put it this way: neither the filmmakers nor the audience give a crap about Katherine Waterson, Danny McBride or any of the other new characters. We *all know* that we're just twiddling our thumbs and waiting for them to meet up with Michael Fassbender's David. And it takes a while for that reunion to happen. It's not like the original Alien, where the movie is actually *about* the human characters and we get to know them and we care about them before they stumble across the Space Jockey's ship.

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On 12/27/2016 at 0:22 PM, Buckeye Jones said:

So, presumably someone you know has been killed in a horrid fashion.  So to grieve, you hit the showers--you know, wash away the pain. Oh, and get some with the other guy who's also washing away his sorrows with a good rinse.  And of course your shower doesn't have any walls--it's just a big tunnel that goes off into darkness.  Darkness, conveniently, where the nasty thing who has just eaten a few of your colleagues is waiting to eat one of you two who decided the best and most effective way to handle a crisis is to get some nookie.  Only this time, it's not a freak in a hockey mask punishing you for having sex, it's a xenomorph, who predictively allows the cameraman to get a good view first, then sprays blood all over your boobs in an aesthetic manner while you figure out how to fight it off naked, saving your vengeance for a later, more clothed, chance. Can. Not. Wait.

I realize this is set in the future and all, and there are concessions made to the whole notion that we've figured out space travel, but this bugged me (especially from the director of The Martian) just on the level of being profligate with water. Showers on space ships? Are they making water? Recylcing it? I realize this is the least of science concerns, maybe, but it grated. (Was it Bill McKibben or someone else who introduced the axiom that if our technology is sufficient to terraform some other planet, wouldn't it be sufficient to terraform, i.e. save, this one?)

EDIT: P.S. -- it is indicative of the issues griped about above that when this shower scene happened (don't want to be too specific for possible spoilers), I had no clue who these two characters were, what their relationship was to each other or the main characters, or whether I was supposed to even know or not.

Edited by kenmorefield

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Andrew   

Thank you for all of that exposition, Peter.  I thought Prometheus was fun and creepy, even if it had way too much of scientists behaving stupidly.  Covenant, OTOH, just felt flat and predictable after its first 30 minutes.  Here's my full review, though it feels a bit extraneous after Peter's commentary:  http://www.patheos.com/blogs/secularcinephile/2017/05/alien-covenant-starts-promisingly-fails-stretch/

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kenmorefield wrote:
: P.S. -- it is indicative of the issues griped about above that when this shower scene happened (don't want to be too specific for possible spoilers), I had no clue who these two characters were, what their relationship was to each other or the main characters, or whether I was supposed to even know or not.

I had no idea who they were either, really -- as individuals, that is -- but the spaceship in question is populated by couples (married or otherwise), so I assumed their relationship *to each other* was that they were one of these couples. (Although now I'm wondering if the film ever spells out that the ship is populated by couples, or if this is one of those things I picked up from the marketing materials.)

Is it okay to say I'm a little disappointed that the nudity wasn't a tad more graphic in that scene? I mean, if you're going to *have* a slasher-style murder-in-the-shower scene in an R-rated film, you might as well *go* for it...

FWIW, a slightly tweaked version of some extra thoughts I posted elsewhere earlier today:

*** SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS ***

*** SPOILERS SPOILERS ***

*** STILL SPOILERS ***

*** OKAY, THEN. ***

Why were the Engineers *waving* to David's ship when it arrived? Do North American crowds gather to wave hello to incoming airplanes? The Engineers had been traveling through space for thousands, if not millions, of years. If the arriving ship was just one of many random ships, why would they greet it like that? Who's the Engineer equivalent of an air traffic controller here?

(Side note: The Engineer ship in the prologue to Prometheus was different from the ship that we saw in Alien, the rest of Prometheus and Covenant because a lot of time had passed, and spaceship designs had changed. So say the filmmakers on the Prometheus Blu-Ray. A lot of time, in that case, meant potentially millions of years, whereas the ship that connects Prometheus and Covenant might be only 2,000 years old.)

By the way, how did David and Elizabeth get *off* the ship? And why did the ship *crash*?

And did I miss something, or was there basically no power in the Engineer city? If there wasn't, then why wasn't there any? We saw in Prometheus how an abandoned military lab could still function after 2,000 years -- heck, the Engineer in suspended animation was still alive after thousands of years! (Khan Noonien Singh's ship only had to keep him alive for two or three *hundred* years.) It seems strange that David would be working by candlelight only ten years after wiping out the city's population (if I'm remembering correctly).

Incidentally, why *were* there tons of bombs on that ship? We know why there were tons of bombs on the ship that crashed in Prometheus -- because it was *supposed* to be going to Earth to wipe out humanity. But that ship crashed, and Elizabeth Shaw got to pick another ship before going to the Engineer homeworld. Would she have knowingly taken all those black-goo weapons *with* her!? (Maybe, if she wanted a defense against the Engineers. But maybe not, given that she was taking David with her, and she knew David was responsible for a lot of the misery that had befallen her and her now-dead boyfriend. I'll set aside for now the implausibility of an archaeologist being sufficiently advanced in robotics to put David's head back on his body in such a way that she fixes his voice and she leaves no visible seam on his skin.)

A screenwriter I know says the climax of the film borrows heavily from an early version of Joss Whedon's script for Alien Resurrection (in which something happened involving a combine harvester), and he says the aliens-in-the-grass scene echoed a scene from an unused draft of Alien 3. And a few people have noted that the ending of Covenant is very similar to the ending that Ridley Scott says he *wanted* to have in the original Alien. It's like Covenant has been pieced together from the scraps of scenes that were cut from the earlier films.

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One more comment, re-posted from my Facebook wall:

- - -

Years ago, in my review of Alien vs Predator, I noted that the Alien franchise hinged on female archetypes (mothers defending their young, etc.) whereas the Predator franchise hinged on male archetypes (musclebound hunter-warriors engaging in rites of passage, etc.). One of the more striking things about Alien: Covenant is the way it's kind-of, sort-of the first Alien film that strays from the archetype of the earlier films. It really *is* more concerned with the male androids -- and the "father"-"son" relationship between androids and the men who make them -- than it is with anything else.

There has been a debate in some circles over whether the sci-fi films of the 1950s -- the ones with the giant queen ants, etc. -- were afraid of femininity or something else. One argument went that the queen ants were female, and thus the monster was an expression of sexist fears. But the other argument went that the queen ant reproduced *without relationship* -- it just laid its eggs and let them hatch -- and so the *real* fear being addressed in these films was fear of a "rational" future in which all emotion, personality and inter-human warmth was discarded in favour of industrial-scale conformity and replication. (See also Invasion of the Body Snatchers, etc.) Suffice it to say that there are images in Alien: Covenant that tempt you to associate *male* entities with the creation and industrial-scale replication of life.

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Like so many movies lately, I liked the first half of this (precisely because the action was just a rehash of the early Alien movies) and the second half really fell apart for me.

SPOILER QUESTION:

If David at the end of the film wants to wipe out humanity, why mess around with planting the alien embryos in the cryo chamber? Why not just kill everyone on board the ship while they're sleeping and destroy all the human embryos? I'm sure there's something that explains all of this in the copious dialogue that came before.

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On 5/21/2017 at 1:39 PM, Peter T Chattaway said:

I had no idea who they were either, really -- as individuals, that is -- but the spaceship in question is populated by couples (married or otherwise), so I assumed their relationship *to each other* was that they were one of these couples. (Although now I'm wondering if the film ever spells out that the ship is populated by couples, or if this is one of those things I picked up from the marketing materials.)

The film itself *never* mentions that the Covenant crew is made up of couples, nor does it clearly delineate who those couples actually are. If I had not watched the trailer for this film, which explicitly mentions "this crew is made up of couples" and has a long scene where Daniels thanks the crew for their sacrifice, the film does essentially nothing to establish who any of these characters actually are or why their relationships matter. Case in point: why is James Franco in this film?

Spoiler alert: Speaking of couples, beyond the Fassbender kiss scene, was there a gay couple on the ship's crew? I noticed a moment between the two soldiers who hunt after David in the later sequence, one of which is played by Demian Bichir (the sergeant whose face gets burned by acid) when Bichir's character holds the other dead man in his arms and the camera focuses on his hand stroking a wedding ring on his finger.

On 5/19/2017 at 5:19 PM, Tyler said:

Nothing in Covenant is nearly as bad as Prometheus's worst moments, but Covenant's good parts were never as memorable or engaging as Prometheus's, either.

I think this is about where I land. Prometheus has script problems and its characters are incredibly stupid, but at least it *had* characters and some crazy ambitious ideas to go along with its visuals. Given a chance to re-watch either of these films right now, I'd choose Prometheus.

UpdatePrometheus is David; Alien: Covenant is Walter. The former is an ambitious, philosophical, terrifying mess. The latter, in an attempt to "improve" upon its predecessor, essentially trades in its creative ambition for stodginess and familiarity.

Edited by Joel Mayward

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