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Mr. Arkadin

Spectre (2015)

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SKYFALL isn't even out yet and BOND 24 is already in the works, apparently scheduled for an autumn 2014 release.

According to the Daily Mail, veteran Bond screenwriters Neal Purvis and Robert Wade (who have been with the Bond franchise since THE WORLD IS NOT ENOUGH) are stepping away from Bond, and John Logan, who worked on SKYFALL, will be going BOND 24 solo.

Some cast members from SKYFALL will also be returning, it seems: Naomie Harris, Ben Whishaw, and Ralph Fiennes.

No word on whether or not Mendes will be back.

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Interesting... That would make him the first director to handle two consecutive Bond films since John Glen directed all five of the films released in the '80s (i.e. the last three Roger Moores and both Timothy Daltons), wouldn't it?

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Interesting... That would make him the first director to handle two consecutive Bond films since John Glen directed all five of the films released in the '80s (i.e. the last three Roger Moores and both Timothy Daltons), wouldn't it?

Yep.

I think EON has asked every director back since Glen left except for Spottiswoode, who directed TOMORROW NEVER DIES. Most directors turned them down. I think Lee Tamahori actually said yes, but they dropped Tamahori when they decided to reboot the series with CASINO ROYALE.

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SDG   
I think EON has asked every director back since Glen left except for Spottiswoode, who directed TOMORROW NEVER DIES.

I wonder why they didn't ask Spottiswoode. I thought Tomorrow Never Dies easily the best of the Brosnan films, despite a slack middle act and a poorly cast/directed Teri Hatcher. (Revisiting it maybe two or three years ago, I was disappointed at how poorly I thought it held up, but I'm sure the others would fare worse to my post-Bourne sensibilities.)

P.S. Goodness, how would you even know that, Ryan? You obviously follow the franchise much more closely than I realized.

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I wonder why they didn't ask Spottiswoode.

Allegedly, he was very difficult to work with.

I thought Tomorrow Never Dies easily the best of the Brosnan films, despite a slack middle act and a poorly cast/directed Teri Hatcher. (Revisiting it maybe two or three years ago, I was disappointed at how poorly I thought it held up, but I'm sure the others would fare worse to my post-Bourne sensibilities.)

When I revisited GOLDENEYE last, I found that it held up far better than I remembered.

P.S. Goodness, how would you even know that, Ryan? You obviously follow the franchise much more closely than I realized.

I have a peculiar tendency to thoroughly research anything I have an interest in. When I was very young, I went through phases of obsession with odd things, like the Statue of Liberty or the history of ancient Egypt. Now, it tends to be filmmakers or authors rather than franchises (there was my Stanley Kubrick phase that came about at the end of my college days, and I had an Anthony Burgess phase a year or two back). My discovery of Bond more or less coincided with my introduction to the internet, and it has ended up sticking with me, for better or worse.

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Anders   

I thought Tomorrow Never Dies easily the best of the Brosnan films, despite a slack middle act and a poorly cast/directed Teri Hatcher. (Revisiting it maybe two or three years ago, I was disappointed at how poorly I thought it held up, but I'm sure the others would fare worse to my post-Bourne sensibilities.)

When I revisited GOLDENEYE last, I found that it held up far better than I remembered.

Yes, I think GOLDENEYE is easily the best of the Brosnan films. Sean Bean's Alec Trevalyan is one of the series best characters. It's probably my favourite Bond film between OHMSS and CASINO ROYALE, which says quite a bit.

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SDG   

Huh. Haven't seen Goldeneye since its theatrical release. My memory is well-done but lightweight. Will have to revisit.

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I've always had a very, very difficult time with Tomorrow Never Dies, partly because of the Teri Hatcher bits but also because of the whole Rupert-Murdoch-as-supervillain thing. The idea that a guy like that sits around tapping out diabolical newspaper headlines was just silly. (I like Glenn Kenny's recent suggestion that this film was too "inside-baseball". Which reminds me, another stumbling block for me is Michael Wilson's cameo as one of the evil conspirators -- though it didn't bug me back when I didn't know what Wilson looked like.)

Plus, the opening sequence really confirmed (though it was there in Goldeneye, too) that the Brosnan Bond was no longer as much of a spy as he was a commando, which somehow seemed inappropriate to the character.

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I've always had a very, very difficult time with Tomorrow Never Dies, partly because of the Teri Hatcher bits but also because of the whole Rupert-Murdoch-as-supervillain thing.

The media baron angle worked somewhat better in the film's first draft, which gave the villain a much stronger motivation than the finished film. (TOMORROW NEVER DIES was the victim of endless rewrites and revisions; something like ten different writers took stabs at the script, including none other than Donald Westlake!)

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NBooth   

I guess it's time to start a wacky Twitter game naming the next Bond director (Lynch, Malick, Wes Anderson--these are the obvious choices).

Going by the trend, I guess they'll try to snag another director who isn't known for making thrillers. So, Tom Hooper? Joe Wright? [insert jokes about closeups w/r/t Hooper; I personally find Wright a tad too painterly in his approach]. Anton Corbijn could be interesting [based on The American], but I doubt he's well-known enough. Same with Rowan Joffe, who did a fair enough job with Brighton Rock but hasn't really directed anything since. [Although it would be nice for a more obscure director to get the job, I doubt they'll go that route now]

EDIT: Seriously, though--Nolan. I know, he's got issues with directing action. I know, his plots fall apart if you look at them with more than mild interest. But I would love to see what he would do with a Bond movie (I mean, beyond what he already did with Inception). Problem: he'd want to write the script. Which I'd be down for (even allowing for his scripting problems), but I doubt EON would.

Edited by NBooth

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My money is on Danny Boyle or Joe Wright.

Nolan is probably too tied up with INTERSTELLAR and the DC movie universe, but he really wants to direct a Bond movie.

How 'bout the one and only Steven Spielberg? He's always been a big Bond fan.

Edited by Ryan H.

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NBooth   

My money is on Danny Boyle or Joe Wright.

I didn't even think of Boyle, but now that you mention it--he has already directed Craig-as-Bond once, so that might be a nice "in" for him.

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Tyler   

You're all overlooking the obvious choice: Hsiao-hsien Hou. The movie is nothing but a remote-controlled blimp following Bond around London for 2 hours. I would pay ALL THE MONEY to watch that.

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Ryan H. wrote:

: How 'bout the one and only Steven Spielberg? He's always been a big Bond fan.

Too American. Every director to date has come from the British Commonwealth, with the exception of Marc Forster (Quantum of Solace), who is Swiss-German (and who justified the choice of him because Bond's mother was Swiss!).

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Anodos   

Empire magazine have a feature on 14 Possible Directors For Bond 24. Of these candidates I would most like to see Tomas Alfredson or Kathryn Bigelow have a crack at it. Unlikely, because the directors are almost always British, but Alfredson is superb at setting a mood, and nobody does edge-of-the-seat tension better than Bigelow. I wouldn't mind a Joe Wright effort either - I know he can be too mannered, but he has a good directorial eye (and I must admit, I would LOVE to see a six-minute tracking shot in a Bond...)

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Anodos wrote:

: . . . and I must admit, I would LOVE to see a six-minute tracking shot in a Bond . . .

Heh. Me too, now that you mention it.

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