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Family viewing: Off the beaten path

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How about the Secret of Nimh.

There might be a bit of a magical element in this although it's really just technology, but little kids might not be able to discern.

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I second The Story of the Weeping Camel

I've heard more than one family testify that it enthralls their children. Including very, very young children. I'm sure the presence of very young children in the film has something to do with that.

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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Also I remember Darby O-Gill and the little people as being a great movie.

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Dr. Larabee has Akeelah read from a plague on his wall. That quote is from Marianne Williamson's "A Return to Love: Reflections from the Principles of A Course In Miracles." A Course In Miracles has theoligical problems that have been brought out by many an apologetics industry.

The quotation is presumably in the movie because it's been widely ascribed to Nelson Mandela. While it does come from Williamson (and it appears Mandela never quoted it in any speech), the quotation itself doesn't strike me as particularly New Agey or significantly problematic. It's pretty typical motivational stuff, albeit spiritually inflected.


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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I was going to suggest Carrol Ballard's The Black Stallion, but then thought two things... 1) It may be too popular to fit into the "off the beaten path" motif, and 2) I seem to remember my step-kids (aged 7 and 13 at the time) being kind of bored by it over the long haul. However, several months after that viewing, my step-kids sat down with us and were totally enthralled by Ballard's follow-up film Never Cry Wolf, which didn't enjoy the same success as The Black Stallion, but I found every bit as good, if not superior.

Edited by John Drew

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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My only point is that if the kids latch on to the quote, they may seek its source.

Of course, in the same manner, if the kids latch on to the real-life personality of Josh Waitzkin, they, too, may seek his off-the-Christian-beaten-path life-history. And this is more true for Bobby Fischer himself.

How about Stand And Deliver?


Nick Alexander

Keynote, Worship Leader, Comedian, Parodyist

Host of the Prayer Meeting Podcast - your virtual worship oasis. (Subscribe)

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Attica: I'm not a fan of The Secret of NIMH, but my reasons have nothing to do with magic (I'm totally okay with fantasy magic in fiction). It badly botches the source material, and doesn't really work as a story in its own right.

I recall enjoying Darby O'Gill as a kid, but I'd have to watch it again as an adult before I could recommend it. The comic drunk scenes and the scary banshee would give me pause (plus, I'd have to reevaluate its appeal for kids today).

Jeff: What you say about Weeping Camel is exactly my experience, and what I'm writing in my blurb for that film.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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I have no problem with fantasy magic in fiction, but thought I should mention it because some do. I've never read the source material and agree that it has story problems. Yet there's still some incredible stuff in there.

I had wondered the same about Darby O'Gill. I haven't seen it since I was a kid and I think maybe I should re-visit it.

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I was going to suggest Carrol Ballard's The Black Stallion, but then thought two things... 1) It may be too popular to fit into the "off the beaten path" motif, and 2) I seem to remember my step-kids (aged 7 and 13 at the time) being kind of bored by it over the long haul. However, several months after that viewing, my step-kids sat down with us and were totally enthralled by Ballard's follow-up film Never Cry Wolf, which didn't enjoy the same success as The Black Stallion, but I found every bit as good, if not superior.

I loved the Black Stallion as a child.

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Time Bandits I saw when I was young, my first experience with Terry Gilliam. Of course, it has that Grimm fairy tale ending, and it has Sir Ralph Richardson playing God (which may or may not be a problem). But the imagination here is vast and enjoyable.


Nick Alexander

Keynote, Worship Leader, Comedian, Parodyist

Host of the Prayer Meeting Podcast - your virtual worship oasis. (Subscribe)

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I haven't seen 7 Up, the first in Apted's series, in a long time. But I'll bet children would find it interesting (since children find children interesting). And it would begin a series that parents could share and discuss with their children as they grow up, so long as they don't show small children the later installments.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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Ladyhawke. That movie really holds up for me (whatever you think of the musical score). But it's too violent for young children. (You mentioned Raiders earlier, which is far more violent.)

Pee Wee's Big Adventure.

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen.

Both for older kids.

Would Edward Scissorhands be too well-known to qualify? (Also for older children. The salon scene, you know.)


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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Jeff: Re. Ladyhawke: In a plot synopsis I read, "On the run from a villainous bishop..." and I wonder: How much of a concern is this for a Catholic publication, in a list of movies specifically for kids?


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Maybe Shane would work. Or My Girl.

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Attica:

The Wind in the Willows = Maybe.

The Water Horse is one of those films, like Lassie, Two Brothers and Duma, that I enjoyed once and haven't revisited. (Why is that?)

Everyone's Hero: not much of a fan.


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Into the West.

And I strongly second The Secret of Roan Inish.

Jeff: Re. Ladyhawke: In a plot synopsis I read, "On the run from a villainous bishop..." and I wonder: How much of a concern is this for a Catholic publication, in a list of movies specifically for kids?

Well, it's pretty clear that the bishop is not representative of the church. He's putting curses on true lovers, which is witchcraft, right? Is it bad to introduce children to the idea that church leaders can be untrustworthy? The lovers are saved with the help of a priest who praises God at the end.

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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Not many people in our time seem to remember An American Tale, or its sequel.

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Is it bad to introduce children to the idea that church leaders can be untrustworthy?

No, but context helps. Specifically, this helps: "The lovers are saved with the help of a priest who praises God at the end." Which is why I asked.


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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I'm looking thru the IMDB Top 250:

North by Northwest (but ONLY if you have widescreen)

Modern Times

To Kill a Mockingbird

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

Mr Smith Goes to Washington

The Elephant Man (this is the David Lynch PG movie to do).

High Noon

Million Dollar Baby (not)

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

Arsenic and Old Lace


Nick Alexander

Keynote, Worship Leader, Comedian, Parodyist

Host of the Prayer Meeting Podcast - your virtual worship oasis. (Subscribe)

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