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Peter T Chattaway

The Predator

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Links to our threads on Alien Vs Predator (2004-2007) and Predators (2010). We don't seem to have any threads on Predator (1987) or Predator 2 (1990).

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‘Iron Man 3's’ Shane Black to Direct ‘Predator’ Reboot for Fox
Shane Black is attached to direct a reboot of the classic 80s action movie “Predator” for 20th Century Fox, an individual familiar with the project has told TheWrap.
Black will co-write a treatment for the film with “Monster Squad” director Fred Dekker, who will then write the screenplay himself. . . .
Black has a long history with the “Predator” franchise, having appeared in a bit part in the original film. . . .
TheWrap.com, June 24

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Hands up, everyone who remembered that Shane Black had a bit part in the original film, and who thought about that the moment they saw this headline. [raises hand]

For some reason this reminds me of how William Wyler was an assistant director on the 1925 version of Ben-Hur before he became the Oscar-winning director of the 1959 version of Ben-Hur. (And, hmmm, the gap between those films was 34 years, while the gap between the original Predator and today is 27 years and counting...)

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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Hands up, everyone who remembered that Shane Black had a bit part in the original film, and who thought about that the moment they saw this headline. [raises hand]

 

[Raises hand]

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Have any of these reboots been successful?  I mean, I have all these positive vibes towards these eighties and nineties action movies, but can't think of any reboot (save the Star Trek ones) that I've seen or have gotten good reviews, or have done well at the box office.  Are they profitable, generating cash on name recognition, production values, and nostalgia?  Or are they not making money because nostalgia does not a block buster make?  Is this cycle of remakes typical, that is, if we look at any 20-30 chunk of film history, do we see a series of remakes (a la Ben Hur, which was closer to 40-50 years of a gap, or Scarface, again a 40-50 year gap)?

 

Shane Black seems a good choice--at least he's familiar with the source material; but without a huge gimmick of  Schwarzeneggerian magnitude ("If it bleeds, we can kill it"), I just don't see it doing anything but flaming out at the BO.

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Buckeye Jones wrote:
: Have any of these reboots been successful?  I mean, I have all these positive vibes towards these eighties and nineties action movies, but can't think of any reboot (save the Star Trek ones) that I've seen or have gotten good reviews, or have done well at the box office.

 

Well, just thinking of what's out there this summer...

 

Godzilla was a decent hit (even if it made less than the 1998 film, once you adjust for inflation).

 

The two Amazing Spider-Man films have outgrossed the first two Sam Raimi films overseas, though they're behind all three Raimi films in North America and thus worldwide.

 

Many people thought Rise of the Planet of the Apes was surprisingly good, and while it may be behind the 1968 and 2001 films in North America once you adjust for inflation, it did get a sequel (opening in a couple weeks), which the 2001 reboot did not.

 

X-Men: Days of Future Past is sort of a sequel to the original movies, true, but it's mainly a sequel to the reboot (or "preboot") First Class, which many people thought was one of the best films in the series -- and Days of Future Past is now the top-grossing film in the franchise by far overseas (though it's still slightly behind The Last Stand in North America, in unadjusted dollars), and it had pretty good reviews too.

 

And Maleficent is arguably a "reboot" of Sleeping Beauty, and it's the top-grossing film of Angelina Jolie's career (apart from the animated Kung Fu Panda films, where she voices one of the supporting characters).

 

The only other "reboots" I can think of this year are: Muppets Most Wanted (which is technically a sequel to a reboot of sorts), and yeah, it flopped; Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit, which struggled; and RoboCop, which did pretty well overseas.

 

So, "reboot" culture is skewing *somewhat* positive for the studios, I think. At any rate, I imagine many executives are thinking, "Just imagine how much *worse* shape we'd be in if we were releasing films that didn't have this kind of brand-name recognition!"

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It's a weird hodgepodge, isn't it?  I forgot about the Planet of the Apes movie (which is a 2nd reboot!) but I saw that and liked it.  Spiderman, I haven't seen, and Godzilla I forgot about, too. 

 

The "reboots" seem to fall into three categories:  1) New and pseudo sequels a la Muppets, Terminator and X men, 2) Complete remakes/repurposing like Apes, Robocop and Star Trek, and 3) New versions of same non-film source material like Spiderman and Dredd.  And success seems to favor categories 1& 2... I get the business case behind re-using established properties, but am not a happy consumer about it (no surprises to this community, I'm sure).  I'd like to see more attempts at category 3--new envisionings of existing non-film work--almost like a new staging of a Shakespeare play, with a different lens and approach brought to bear on great stories.

 

Or maybe I'm just grumpy about having Arnold's glory days turned into crappy remakes.

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Shane Black says the movie won't be a reboot. Or that's his and Dekker's preference, at least.

 

 

While the initial report said that Black’s new Predator film would be a reboot, Black tells us that he and Dekker see the project as definitely not a reboot, “As far as Fred and I are concerned anyway,” Black said, adding “Why start over, when you’ve all this rich mythology yet to mine?”  Black said he doesn’t like reboots generally, but can “really get behind inventive sequels”, noting that he likes “the idea of expanding and exploring the existing Predator mythology, rather than hitting the restart button.”
Edited by Tyler

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This was one of the more incoherent, poorly edited action films I've ever seen, up there with the Transformers films and Suicide Squad. Perhaps it was the theatre I was in, but the night scenes--which are almost all of them--are so poorly lit and blocked that it's quite hard to discern what is happening. I'm a fan of the Predator series, but not a fan of this.

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