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When the Game Stands Tall

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Wait, Jim Caviezel made a faith-friendly sports film and we didn't have a thread prior to opening day? Eek. 

 

Well, here's my full review. Suz read it and said,

 

"Your 60-second review should go like this: 'I'm Steven Greydanus with my Reel Faith 60-second review of When the Game Stands Tall. [30 seconds of silence] Meh. [30 seconds of silence] End music." 

 

 


When the Game Stands Tall is morally earnest and sincere, with characters who talk about things that matter. The characters themselves, alas, are as thin as cardboard. Some of the actors add some extra depth, including Michael Chiklis as Bob’s assistant coach and Ser’Darius Bain as one of the Spartans’ three notable black players. But the dialogue largely consists of characters standing around explaining things to each other: their beliefs and principles, their motivations and struggles.
 
 
The film insists that there’s more to life than football. Yet the players urgently tell one another, not only at the outset, but even at the climax, “No matter where we go or what we achieve, nothing is going to come close to what we have here.” The idea of life climaxing at high school is depressing enough; more importantly, it undermines the movie’s bid for larger themes.
Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Heh. 

 

Via Facebook, someone asks: "Would an alternate headline be: When the Game Falls Flat?"

 

To which I responded that "that might be a LITTLE harsh. More like When the Game Stands Around Explaining Stuff."


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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What if "game" refers to deer or some other animal being hunted? The noun wouldn't be abstract any more then.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I was going to say I'd watch a movie about a football-playing deer, but then I remembered the Air Bud franchise.


It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
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You guys. Now you're making me think about all these other movies called When the Game Stands Tall I would have liked to review.


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Suz read it and said,

 

"Your 60-second review should go like this: 'I'm Steven Greydanus with my Reel Faith 60-second review of When the Game Stands Tall. [30 seconds of silence] Meh. [30 seconds of silence] End music." 

That's my reaction to 80% of the movies I see.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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trying to figure out the title... "when the game stands proud"? is that what it means? does tall mean "proud"? or "courage"? why not a person with courage, why a game? a game can't stand tall, or be proud, or have courage, so what does it mean? even then I would think a game (football or otherwise) generally doesn't require much courage to write home about, at least not like other situations that require courage. ...although, if the story has to do with a Christian football player who has to debate his atheist coach in front of the team, and will be benched if he fails to win the argument, and then he does win the argument, and wins the game, and the girl too, with then the team becomes all Christians (or thoughtfully curious), and the unrepentant coach ends up dying in a moment of audience schadenfreude - then that would stand tall in my mind.

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I am not a big analytics guru, but I was mildly surprised to look at IMDB's ratings breakdown: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2247476/ratings?ref_=tt_ov_rt

 

The two demographics giving the film the highest score? Women under 18 (9.9/10) and women over 45 (8.7/10). 

 

Lowest? Men aged 30-44 (6.2) followed by men 18-29 (6.5).

 

So this is really not a date movie. They just need to figure out how to get moms to take their daughters. Maybe double feature it with Mom's Night Out? 

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I am not a big analytics guru, but I was mildly surprised to look at IMDB's ratings breakdown: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2247476/ratings?ref_=tt_ov_rt

 

The two demographics giving the film the highest score? Women under 18 (9.9/10) and women over 45 (8.7/10). 

 

Lowest? Men aged 30-44 (6.2) followed by men 18-29 (6.5).

 

So this is really not a date movie. They just need to figure out how to get moms to take their daughters. Maybe double feature it with Mom's Night Out? 

 

I work with a number of evangelical women who are refreshingly straightforward in their conviction that Jim Caviezel is HOT, and certainly the hottest Jesus to grace the big screen. Perhaps that explains the above statistics.

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morgan1098 wrote:
: I work with a number of evangelical women who are refreshingly straightforward in their conviction that Jim Caviezel is HOT, and certainly the hottest Jesus to grace the big screen.

 

Oh dear. You mean Diogo Morgado hasn't supplanted him yet?


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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