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Peter T Chattaway

Star Trek: The Original Series

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Alright! For years now, I have found it rather silly that the original Star Trek was released in a series of about 40 DVDs, each of which had only two episodes, while all the OTHER shows in the franchise have been released in season-by-season boxed sets. For years, I have said that I might buy the original series if it came out in season-by-season sets (especially since there were only THREE seasons), but there was no way I was gonna waste time and money hunting down those other discs. Well, at last, someone at Paramount has heard my cry, and the cries of thousands of others like me ...

The question NOW is, do I pick up each season as it comes, or do I hold out in case there is some sort of uber-package which includes all three seasons?

- - -

Star Trek Set to Bow in New Season-by-Season DVD Box Sets

Paramount Home Entertainment delivers the highly anticipated Star Trek -- The Complete First Season on DVD this August 31, in an 8-disc collectible box set. The box will contain all 29 episodes -- in airdate order -- from Season One of the original Star Trek series, along with newly produced bonus features exclusive to this DVD release.

The contents of the DVDs are as follows:

Disc 1: "The Man Trap," "Charlie X," "Where No Man Has Gone Before,"* "The Naked Time"

Disc 2: "The Enemy Within," "Mudd's Women," "What Are Little Girls Made Of?" "Miri"

Disc 3: "Dagger of the Mind," "The Corbomite Maneuver," "The Menagerie, Part I,"* The Menagerie, Part II"*

Disc 4: "The Conscience of the King,"* "Balance of Terror," "Shore Leave," "The Galileo Seven"

Disc 5: "The Squire of Gothos," "Arena," "Tomorrow is Yesterday," "Court Martial"

Disc 6: "The Return of the Archons," "Space Seed," "A Taste of Armageddon," "This Side of Paradise"

Disc 7: "The Devil in the Dark," "Errand of Mercy," "The Alternative Factor," "The City on the Edge of Forever"

Disc 8: "Operation: Annihilate!"

* These four episodes have text commentary by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

Disc 8 of the DVD also includes the following special features:

• The Birth of a Timeless Legacy: The definitive telling of how it all began: from the first pilot, "The Cage," to reshooting the pilot with William Shatner, to the many challenges leading up to its premiere on NBC in 1966. Included are interviews with cast and network executives and producers. Also featured are new interviews with William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, and Robert Justman.

• Life Beyond Trek: William Shatner: Featured on each volume, this featurette follows one principal cast member around on their most current film and TV projects, charity events, conventions, trips, or hobbies. In Season One, William Shatner gives viewers an exclusive invitation to his ranch to discuss his love of horses.

• To Boldly Go...: Includes discussion of "The Naked Time," "The City on the Edge of Forever," "The Devil in the Dark" and "The Squire of Gothos" by cast and production crew members.

• Reflections on Spock: Leonard Nimoy discusses his character in depth, and explains why he chose to write two different books on the subject: "I Am Not Spock" and "I Am Spock."

• Sci-Fi Visionaries: A look at Star Trek's famous writers, featuring interviews with Gene Coon, Harlan Ellison, George Clayton Thomas, Richard Matheson, D.C. Fontana, Gene Roddenberry, Bob Justman and John D.F. Black.

• Original Preview Trailers

• Photo Log

This DVD set should retail for around $100. It is presented in full-screen format and in Dolby Digital English 5.1 and English Dolby Surround. The DVDs are subtitled in English and closed-captioned for the hearing-impaired.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Aha! According to Amazon.com it seems Season One comes out in August, Season Two in November, and Season Three in December -- so the entire series should be out by Christmas. They also have a page for "The Complete Seasons 1-3", but no graphic to indicate what this particular package might look like.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I've been waiting for these season sets as well. I'm not the Trek nut that you are, Peter, but I do really like the original cast and the classic series. This will be the only Trek series I buy, and I plan to buy all three seasons. (Actually, i'll pick up the animated one when and if they release it. I have faith...) I wish we knew how much that uber-set will cost. I'm willing to wait until Dec. or later if I can save a few bucks.

JiM T


Find my twitchin' film reviews at Twitch

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Peter...buy them all at the same time. That's an Amazon thing-they will sell you all of them together. Paramount will not be putting them out in uniquely different packaging. If you wait you are buying the exact same set you would buy one at a time. Nothing different. Amazon does that with pretty much all the TV show sets. They did it when the 7th season of Friends came out, for example. But there was no special packaging.


"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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Well, I know that the seven Next Generation seasons were all sold in a big Borg-shaped boxed set, so I'm wondering if there might be something like that for this, too.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I suppose it's possible. I just know that when Amazon mentions a Seasons 1-(whatever number of seasons), it's usually not a special set. For example, everytime a new season of the X-Files came out, they offered a special where you could buy all the seasons available at that point at once. Have any of the other Treks been completely released on DVD at this point? Or do they still have a season or two to go on Deep Space Nine and Voyager? If either has every season out in stores...have they done anything special for them? I wasn't considering that this was paramount, who puts out a new Box set of the movies everytime they release a special edition 2 disc set.


"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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Nezpop - I know what you mean about Amazon and their bundle offers, but I'm pretty sure I read at digitalbits.com and elsewhere that Paramount would be releasing the three-season set of classic Trek.

JiM T


Find my twitchin' film reviews at Twitch

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Okay, help me make a choice here.

The Season One set is available for exactly the same price at Future Shop and A&B Sound.

However, the Future Shop set comes with a $10 gift certificate AND, if I read the flyer correctly, a bonus disc which I'm guessing is the Best Buy bonus disc referred to here ("if you buy this set at Best Buy, Musicland, Suncoast, Sam Goody or Media Play, you'll get an exclusive bonus disc that includes two more featurettes - Kiss 'N' Tell: Romance in the 24th Century and Trek Connections").

So. If I buy Season One on its own at all, I would be buying it at Future Shop. But ... does anyone know what the plans are, if any, for that uber-set that would include all three seasons?


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Okay, help me make a choice here.

The Season One set is available for exactly the same price at Future Shop and A&B Sound.

However, the Future Shop set comes with a $10 gift certificate AND, if I read the flyer correctly, a bonus disc which I'm guessing is the Best Buy bonus disc referred to here ("if you buy this set at Best Buy, Musicland, Suncoast, Sam Goody or Media Play, you'll get an exclusive bonus disc that includes two more featurettes - Kiss 'N' Tell: Romance in the 24th Century and Trek Connections").

So. If I buy Season One on its own at all, I would be buying it at Future Shop. But ... does anyone know what the plans are, if any, for that uber-set that would include all three seasons?

DigitalBits says all three seasons will be released together in a 3-pack on Dec. 14.

user posted image

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Oh, tish. If THAT'S all they're going to do with the three seasons, then I'm glad I went ahead and bought the first season with the bonus disc at Future Shop. I was wondering if they might do something more "special", like the Borg cube in which you can reportedy get all seven seasons of The Next Generation, but apparently not.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Did you just say "Oh, tish"??

In public?

(tee hee!)


In case you were wondering, my name is spelled "Denes House," but it's pronounced "Throatwobbler Mangrove."

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Having recently relived the death of James T. Kirk in Star Trek: Generations, I figured now was a good time to go back to the beginning of his career, and to finally start going through the original-series DVDs. I had intended to simply watch them, but it became apparent to me very quickly that I might want to take notes -- nothing systematic, just whatever tickles my fancy. Watching these episodes is especially intriguing to me as I have not really seen any of the original episodes in years, and there are quite a few that I have only seen once or twice and barely remember at all; the Trek I know and love best is the Trek of the movies, not the TV show. So in some ways, these discs are new territory for me, yet in other ways, they represent a fun stroll down memory lane.

The episodes are lined up in the order in which they were first broadcast, NOT the order in which they were produced (though each episode is given a number indicating where it fits into the production sequence). I rather like this, since it means I can get a sense of how the show's original audience became acquainted with the characters.

So, here begin my comments on Season One.

06 THE MAN TRAP

-- Dr. McCoy's nickname, at least where that old flame of his is concerned, was "Plum"? Somehow I'm not surprised this never caught on.

-- The villain (though perhaps not so much a villain as a creature that is tragically compelled to kill for its own survival, or to die) of this, the first episode ever broadcast, is a shape-shifter, and probably not the only shape-shifter the crew will meet on its voyages. Thus it is odd when Kirk or McCoy claims in ST6:TUC that they thought shape-shifters were mythical.

-- Love Sulu's exotic flowers, especially the one that looks like a pink glove on a human hand.

-- It's intriguing to see how things were done when certain conventions had not yet been developed yet or were still in flux. In fact, if you compare this episode to the next one that was produced, 07 The Naked Time, it is striking to see certain things we now take for granted were introduced between these two episodes. For example, in this episode, Yeoman Rand is seen walking down a long stretch of corridor to bring a tray of food to Sulu's quarters; but the very next episode will introduce replicators, at least in the mess. Also, Spock has a cut, and his blood is red; but the very next episode will include a line about his blood being green.

-- On the flip side, the Vulcan nerve pinch was invented in the PREVIOUS episode, 05 The Enemy Within, yet here we see an almost comical scene in which Spock clasps his fists together and wacks the monster-posing-as-woman across the face, back and forth, while saying to McCoy, "If she were Nancy, could she take THIS!?" The whole thing seems too action-oriented for Spock. But I guess we can always rationalize this on the grounds that Spock wasn't familiar enough with this monster's anatomy to know where the proper nerve would be.

08 CHARLIE X

-- My roommate walked in on the scene of Kirk, topless and wearing bright-red leotards, trying to show Charlie a few gymnastic tricks, and my roommate remarked that this seemed like the "gay-est" episode of Trek ever. Imagine what he would have said if he had seen the scene where one (black) guy in engineering says to another (white) guy, "You got a deal, friend!" and then slaps him on the ass. (I mention the race of the characters because I'm wondering if this scene reflects a practice common among African-Americans in the mid-1960s or something; certainly I as a white Canadian have never seen guys do this to each other.)

-- Rand tries to match Charlie up with a younger yeoman who is "someone your own age", and since McCoy seems to indicate that Charlie is only 17, I'm guessing this means there are teenagers on the Enterprise crew?

-- Spock's emotions are never all THAT far below the surface, are they? I swear I saw him almost smile when Uhura begin singing along to his harp-playing.

-- Kirk says at one point that it is Thanksgiving "today, on Earth." Is that the Canadian Thanksgiving (Shatner IS a Canuck, after all) or the American Thanksgiving? I am not sure which intrigues me more, the implication that a quasi-religious holiday persists into the 23rd century, or that one can speak of celebrating "the Earth's" holidays on an interplanetary starship when the holidays in question are actually quite particular to specific nations; would they also celebrate, I dunno, Robbie Burns Day for Scotty?

-- Kirk also says something about "synthetic meatloaf" being shaped to resemble "real turkey". Okay, I guess they're still working the bugs out of those replicators.

02 WHERE NO MAN HAS GONE BEFORE

-- Intriguing thematic crosshairs here. The main storyling involves a couple of crewmembers who develop god-like powers, and the arrogance that goes along with that; this gives Kirk the opportunity to bark the line, "Above all else, a god NEEDS compassion!" But something I had forgotten was the degree to which this episode, being the second pilot and the first episode to make a point of Spock's extremely logical nature, also underscores the fact that even the good guys need compassion. Spock, being perfectly logical (although Leonard Nimoy still hasn't figured out how to hold back his smiles and such), advises Kirk to kill Gary Mitchell while he has the chance, before Gary's powers become so great that he destroys the ship, and several people remark that this seems rather heartless of Spock; but at the end of the episode, Spock stands next to the captain's chair and says, softly, "I felt for him too," to which Kirk replies, "I believe there's some hope for you after all, Mister Spock." So, it turns out Spock has a heart after all, and the episode emphasizes, both positively (via Spock) and negatively (via Gary Mitchell), the essential quality of compassion.

-- It's always an interesting question whether stories like this one are meant as a slam against the very notion of gods, period, or whether they are simply taking aim at mere mortals who play God. I think this episode tilts in the latter direction, at least when Kirk calls Gary "a god, but still driven by human frailty." The possibility is left open that some gods might NOT have these frailties.

-- Come to think of it, it's interesting how the Sally Kellerman character is implicitly pooh-poohed for trying to defend Gary as the next step in human evolution, since all the various incarnations of Star Trek have gone on to feature godlike aliens who clearly are NOT all that arrogant or power-trippy, and who surely must have gone through a similar kind of awkward growth stage.

-- It seems laughable now that these early episodes would try to depict Kirk as a guy who's too busy for the ladies. Gary Mitchell recalls that Kirk was into "longhair" philosophers at the Academy, and that Kirk was a "book with legs" whose only significant relationship, with a "blonde lab technician", was set by Mitchell himself. (Kirk says "I almost married her!" and the speculation these days is that this lab technician was Carol Marcus, father of Kirk's son David, as per ST2:TWOK.)

-- Speaking of women, it's also interesting to hear the Sally Kellerman character defend her aloofness by saying, "Women professionals do tend to overcompensate." This, of course, reflects the decade in which the series was made, but will this still be a problem in the 23rd century? (Or the 24th? Does Captain Janeway overcompensate?)

-- There is talk of getting to an "Earth base", not a "starbase".

-- Again, Kirk and Spock gang up on a guy, and there is no nerve pinch.

-- Gary Mitchell refers to a poem written in 1996 (oh, how futuristic!) as "one of the most passionate love sonnets of the past couple of centuries", which would seem to hint that this episode is taking place no later than 2196, though it has since been officially dated to 2265.

-- The story revolves partly around ESP, and Michael Okuda notes in his text commentary that research into ESP was thought to be at the cutting edge of science at that time, though it has largely been abandoned since then. This kind of reminds me of the original novel The Exorcist, in which the Jesuit psychiatrist struggles mightily to come up with a way of proving that Regan is possessed, because he thinks it's possible that she just has ESP and is reading his mind in a "natural" way; those elements were written out of the 1973 movie.

-- Love, love, love the creepy way that Gary stares with his silver eyes directly into the camera when Spock is spying on him. Why do I love this? Because in ALL the various episodes where people put things "on viewer" or otherwise watch things on a screen, I don't think it is EVER established exactly HOW those images are gleaned in the first place; in short, there is no camera, so how are those images being generated? (This problem is actually acknowledged, sort of, in ST4:TVH, when Kirk says "On viewer!" and the 20th-century woman with him says "How can you do that?" Not that her question is ever answered, of course.) So for Gary to actually know WHERE to stare just signals how supernaturally aware of things he has become!

-- Given that this, the first episode to feature Kirk, ends with a big fight scene on a barren planet between Kirk and the bad guy, I guess it might be kind of fitting after all that Kirk should die, nearly 30 years later, at the tail end of another big fight scene on a barren planet.

07 THE NAKED TIME

-- The first episode of the bunch that feels like the Trek I know and love -- even if the entire story is kicked into gear by one crewmember's very, very silly mistake, wherein he removes his glove while in a contaminated environment.

-- Interesting how the transporter decontaminates the suits after beaming the men aboard.

-- Kirk says "Earth science" requires the Enterprise to study the break-up of a planet; there's that geocentrism again!

-- Dated gender politics again, as Uhura takes Riley's place at the helm and Riley, doing the drunken-Irish thing, says he's all in favour of "universal suffrage".

-- Riley proposes having a dance in the bowling alley; does the ship have a bowling alley, then? I like bowling, myself, so that could be pretty cool, if true.

-- Spock reveals a quick flash of ironic humour when he nerve-pinches the sword-wielding Sulu and tells another member of the crew, "Take D'Artagnan here to sickbay."

-- Nurse Chapel refers to a rumour to the effect that Vulcans treat their women "strange". I wonder exactly what the writers had in mind when they gave her this line, and how close it was or wasn't to what was eventually revealed of Vulcan gender relations.

-- The "sinner repent" graffiti is interesting; is religious hysteria being depicted as analogous to drunkenness, then?

-- I have to admit that the poignancy of the moment where Spock confesses his shame over his feelings of friendship for Kirk is ruined somewhat by the frantic way in which Kirk slaps his face to try to get him to snap out of his funk. Poor Spock, he opens up his heart and whack! whack! his friend hits him.

-- Scotty's remark that a certain calculation would require "a row of computers working weeks on the right planet" sound highly improbable, given that Spock ends up solving the problem with his Vulcan mind, and given how powerful and compact computers have become in the nearly 40 years since this episode ran. But hey, that's part of the charm of the thing.

-- And again, Kirk moans that he has no time for the ladies ("No beach to walk on..."). Well, no time for commitment, at any rate. But so far, his studliness has not come into play at all.

One other thing that occurs to me is that people have died in all four of the episodes so far -- in three of them, Enterprise crew members have died, while in 08 Charlie X, an entire ship is destroyed by the title character (though I don't believe any of the Enterprise crew members sustain any lasting damage). Death is so common on this show, I find it a little alarming.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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-- Rand tries to match Charlie up with a younger yeoman who is "someone your own age", and since McCoy seems to indicate that Charlie is only 17, I'm guessing this means there are teenagers on the Enterprise crew?

Closer to Charlie's own age doesn't mean "younger" or the "same age". Really, it does seem logical that there could be 18 or 19 years olds on the ship. And that would qualify as closer to Charlie's age of 17.


"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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As you can tell, I've given up on this episode-by-episode note-taking thing.

But I do want to say that I am now half-way through the second season, and I must say that my favorite episode by far -- the nearest thing to a perfect 48 minutes (and believe you me, there are MANY episodes that are ANYTHING but perfect) -- is 'Journey to Babel'. It's got intrigue, espionage, a space battle, comedy (including a great punchline), and, above all, an almost primal drama of family conflict revolving around Spock and his parents. Love it, love it, love it.

(Mind you, I'm a little curious as to why Kirk would ask Spock, in this episode, if he wants to visit his parents while they're orbiting Vulcan, yet in the slightly earlier episode 'Amok Time', Kirk and Spock actually WENT DOWN to Vulcan -- for a wedding ceremony! well, of sorts -- and no family members were present THEN.)

I must also say, having seen 'The Trouble with Tribbles' today, that I do NOT think it was the best of the original series' episodes, though it is certainly a nice comic romp, compared to some of the more earnest and "meaningful" episodes. I actually find the humour in this episode somewhat repetitive, consisting at times of little more than variations on "I've got something really serious to say! [beat] I really, really don't like those fuzzy things!" The humour in this episode is often quite good, but this particular gag gets weaker with each repetition, IMHO.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Picked up Season Three yesterday. Am suffering through 'Spock's Brain' (the first episode of the season) as I type. Anyhoo, the copy of Season Three that I picked up yesterday came with a 'bonus DVD' containing an extra featurette -- available for a limited time only at Future Shop and related stores -- and my copy of Season One came with one of those too, so I am wondering if there was a 'bonus DVD' with Season Two, because if there was, I evidently missed it.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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If somebody can find aerial pictures of this, it would probably add a lot to the following story....

The Star Trek Maize Maze


Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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YES!!!

This is the last Star Trek item to make it to DVD; I believe all the movies and TV shows have been released once or twice by now, but not this. And since I'm a classic-Trek kind of guy, I do think it would be nice to fill this gap in my collection. (Note: I have the original 1960s series and all ten movies, but I have no interest in getting any of the 1980s, 1990s, or 2000s series.)


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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An aside: Has your sister ever told you that the Star Trek theme is Mahler? ;)

Edited by The Invisible Man

We are part of the generation in which the image has triumphed over the word, when the visual is dominant over the verbal and where entertainment drowns out exposition. We may go so far as to claim that we live in an age of the image which is also the age of anti-word and potentially is the age of the lie. ~ Os Guiness

So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God (Romans 10:17)

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The Invisible Man wrote:

: An aside: Has your sister ever told you that the Star Trek theme is Mahler? ;)

Hey, Inviz, my sister FINALLY answered my e-mail to her on this subject:

Well, is he referring to the Seventh Symphony? Because I hear a lot of Star Trek in that. Rising melodic fourths and all that. Otherwise, I don't know what he means. It would help to know which Star Trek theme he's referring to.

And by the by, did you know that part of the Superman theme is pretty much cut'n'paste from Richard Strauss? (His tone poem "Ein Heldenleben" if memory serves - A Hero's Life - hmm!)

Is any of that what you were getting at?


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Yes, the seventh. I was actually being a tad naughty. I don't know if the composer of the Star Trek theme was actually aware of this piece (it seems likely to me), but whenever I hear the symphony and that haunting little motif begins, my mind immediately conjures up images of Captain Kirk and Mr Spock.

Your sister REALLY is a Mahler nut. :)

By the way, sorry for not replying to you sooner, Peter. This is such a big board with such a lot of interesting stuff to read that I frequently lose track of things.

Edited by The Invisible Man

We are part of the generation in which the image has triumphed over the word, when the visual is dominant over the verbal and where entertainment drowns out exposition. We may go so far as to claim that we live in an age of the image which is also the age of anti-word and potentially is the age of the lie. ~ Os Guiness

So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God (Romans 10:17)

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I've been expecting this for years, and I'm actually interested in seeing it. The original effects were good enough for my imagination to take flight long ago. Star Trek fanned my creative fires like nothing else. When the alien captain in Galaxy Quest is told the ship is a model, and replies mournfully, "but inside I have seen many rooms!" it sums up my childhood approach to the show. The Enterprise was real to me. Real, and huge.

That being said, I trust Michael Okuda and co far more than I trust George Lucas and co to make changes to the original that enhance it, without destroying it. I look forward to seeing what they come up with.


In case you were wondering, my name is spelled "Denes House," but it's pronounced "Throatwobbler Mangrove."

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This seems like the best of our Star Trek threads for this ... the following is from an e-mail that I sent to a friend of mine, and I'm wondering if anybody else here can help me out?

- - -

Hey B---, just wondering if you have any thoughts about those "Star Trek Fan Collective" DVD sets that have come out.

I am particularly intrigued because I've got all the TOS episodes on DVD, but I don't care enough about any of the other shows to collect them in their entirety ... and at least two of these "Fan Collective" sets (i.e. the Borg and Q sets) revolve around characters who didn't even *exist* during the TOS days, so there'd be no overlap at *all*, in those cases!

I remember you once sent me an essay which looked at the evolution of the character Q over the course of all his appearances, and I just checked John de Lancie's filmography at the IMDB and discovered that he only appeared in 12 episodes altogether (8 TNG, 1 DS9, and 3 VOY) -- and *all 12* of those episodes are in the "Fan Collective" Q set! (I love how the sets are all promoted as sets that were "voted on by the fans" -- as if there were any *other* Q episodes that this DVD could have chosen from!)

So I am thinking of getting *that* set, because it would suit at least one of my "completist" impulses without requiring me to buy all 21 seasons of all three shows. (Gadzooks, how much money would that cost!)

But I'm not sure about the other sets. The Borg set could be fun, but I don't know how "complete" it is. Obviously, there is no single character for me to search for at the IMDB, as there was for Q -- so I thought I would check with you first, to see if anything's missing.

The Borg set includes:

Regeneration (Enterprise 049)

Q Who? (TNG 142) -- also covered in the Q set

The Best of Both Worlds pts 1 and 2 (TNG 174-175)

I Borg (TNG 223)

Descent pts 1 and 2 (TNG 252-253)

Scorpion pts 1 and 2 (Voyager 168-169)

Drone (Voyager 196)

Dark Frontier (Voyager 824)

Unimatrix Zero parts 1 and 2 (Voyager 246-247)

Endgame (Voyager 828)

Now, if memory serves, the Borg are introduced by Q in Q Who?, and then they don't appear again until they lay waste to the Federation in The Best of Both Worlds, and then a single Borg is given individuality in I Borg, and then we discover that Lore (Data's twin) has exploited this in Descent. Are there any *other* TNG episodes that deal with the Borg?

If not, then I think the Borg set would satisfy my "completist" impulse, inasmuch as it contains all the TNG episodes. Should I assume that DS9 never had any Borg episodes? If so, then all I have to worry about are the VOY and ENT episodes. I obviously don't want or need all the episodes with that Jeri Ryan character (whatever her name was), but if the ENT episode is a sequel to ST:FC (which I have heard it was) and if the VOY episodes include all the appearances of the Borg Queen (who was first introduced in ST:FC, one of my favorite Trek movies), then that, too, might contribute to satisfying some of my "completist" impulses.

So ... what can you tell me about the VOY and ENT episodes? Were there any *other* ENT episodes that are missing from this set? How "big a deal" are the VOY episodes that are included in this set? Are any really important VOY episodes missing (e.g., anything with the Queen)?

As for the *other* sets ...

Well, if I got the Borg and Q sets, then the Time Travel set would not be all that attractive, actually. I already have the two TOS episodes, of course, and VOY's Endgame is on the Borg set, and TNG's All Good Things... is on the Q set, so that's six episode-hours that would already be covered, out of the fourteen that are on the Time Travel set.

The episodes I would be missing by *not* getting the set are ...

Yesterday's Enterprise (TNG 163)

Cause and Effect (TNG 218)

Time's Arrow parts 1 and 2 (TNG 226-227)

Little Green Men (DS9 480)

Trials and Tribble-ations (DS9 503)

Year of Hell parts 1 and 2 (Voyager 176-177)

... and when there's *this much* redundancy ... well ... Don't get me wrong, I love the *subject* of time travel, but does it warrant buying this set?

The Klingon set is the least important to me. I already have the two TOS episodes, obviously, so that would leave:

Broken Bow (Enterprise 721)

A Matter of Honor (TNG 134)

Sins of the Father (TNG 165)

Redemption parts 1 and 2 (TNG 200-201)

The Way of the Warrior (DS9 718)

The Sword of the Kahless (DS9 481)

Trials and Tribble-ations (DS9 503)

Barge of the Dead (Voyager 223)

Is there any compelling reason I might want this set? (Oh, and look, it's got 'Trials and Tribble-ations', yet *another* episode that also appears on the Time Travel set. That set's looking even *more* redundant.) I note, for example, that this set does *not* include 'Blood Oath', the DS9 episode which featured three of the Klingons from TOS. (As a completist and a TOS fan, I would certainly be interested in *that* episode.)

Hope you don't mind my picking your brain like this! :)


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Wow - that Borg set looks awesome; some of the best episodes of all those shows.

"The Best of Both Worlds, Part 1" is an amazing episode, though the second part doesn't live all the way up to the tension of the first part.

On the Time Travel set, "Yesterday's Enterprise" is one of the best stories in Trek, bar none, and "Trials and Tribble-ations" is Trek heaven.

There are some good eps on the Klingon set, but no "Blood Oath"? That's shameful. "The Sword of Kahless" is a very interesting episode.


In case you were wondering, my name is spelled "Denes House," but it's pronounced "Throatwobbler Mangrove."

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I enjoyed "Little Green Men" for its campiness. One of the better Ferengi episode, IMO.

I would pass on the "Year of Hell". The resolution makes it not worth watching.

I've never been a big fan of the Klingon stories, though I did enjoy "Blood Oath" (shame it's not on the list!) and "Redemption". The rest, eh.

I love time-travel stories, so I would like that set. But that's just me. "Yesterday's Enterprise" is worth getting it just by itself. However, unless you are familiar with Tasha Yar and her storyline, I'm not sure it will have the same effect as it does on others.

Edited by Ann D.

Subtlety is underrated

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