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Peter T Chattaway

Star Wars: Han Solo origin story spin-off

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NBooth   
37 minutes ago, Justin Hanvey said:

Perfect choice.

I'm a fan, although I would be much happier if I knew this movie would just be Han and Lando goofing around instead of the dreary hit-the-points affair I fear it will be. I don't want to see Solo get the Falcon from Lando; I want to see him and Lando have a totally unrelated adventure together. 

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Glover is also six years older than Ehrenreich, just as Williams is six years older than Ford. (Technically Williams is more like five years and three months older than Ford, but The Empire Strikes Back came out between their birthdays, so at the time of its release, if you counted their ages in integers, Williams was six years older.)

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Things aren't really going all that smoothly with these spin-off movies, are they?

Josh Trank's movie was cancelled outright.

Rogue One was heavily re-shot, allegedly by someone else, though Gareth Edwards put on a brave face and was allowed to keep calling himself the director.

And now the directors of the young Han Solo movie have left the project mere weeks before finishing principal photography.

And this, at a time when people have wondered if the flopping of The Book of Henry might spell trouble for Colin Trevorrow's involvement with Episode IX...

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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NBooth   

 

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Honestly I feel like if any Star Wars film needed comedic elements it would be a Han Solo movie. He's basically Star Lord or something like that. Lord and Miller were good choices. Hope it's not too serious come re edits. 

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Is this a sign of Ron Howard's decline or what? The fact that he'd take over a franchise spin-off at the last minute so that he could take his marching orders from Lawrence Kasdan -- how else are we supposed to read this?

Howard will also, interestingly, become the oldest director of a Star Wars movie ever. George Lucas's four films came out when he was 33, 55, 58 and 61. The Empire Strikes Back came out when Irvin Kershner was 57. All of the other films -- Return of the Jedi, The Force Awakens, Rogue One, The Last Jedi, Episode IX -- came out (or are going to come out) when their directors were (or will be) in their 40s. (Though Tony Gilroy, who did *not* receive a credit for his work on Rogue One, was 60 when that film came out.) Lord & Miller are both in their 40s, too. Meanwhile, Ron Howard is 63 and will be 64 by the time this film comes out.

This is, of course, at least the second time that Howard has worked (as a director) with characters created by Lucas, following their collaboration on Willow almost 30 years ago.

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I don't know what Ron Howard's idea of a science fiction universe really looks like...or what kind of individual aesthetic he'll bring to the film, but it seems to me it will be "serious Star Wars", and honestly I don't want Star Wars to just be serious, or epic, I'd also enjoy a couple films that are just fun space romps like Guardians of the Galaxy, which I'd kinda hoped Lord and Miller could bring to the table, even with Kasdan doing the script. There are some elements of that in original trilogy, and Force Awakens, but I think it would have been cool to see Lord and Miller's more comedic touch on the films.

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NBooth   

I don't have a clear idea of Howard's style, either. Based on Willow, I think he could do a pretty good Han Solo movie--if he was in on it from the ground floor. With three weeks left in filming, I have no idea how Howard could even attempt to put a distinctive stamp on the movie.

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Quote

...Kasdan favors a strict adherence to the written word — what is on the page is what must be shot.

 

This from the man who directed and shares screenplay credit on Dreamcatcher.

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: Kasdan favors a strict adherence to the written word — what is on the page is what must be shot.

Which is funny, when you consider that some of the best moments on The Empire Strikes Back were, if not improvised, then at least workshopped by Irvin Kershner and the actors (chief among these everything in the carbon-freeze scene leading up to Han Solo's immortal "I know").

NBooth wrote:
: With three weeks left in filming, I have no idea how Howard could even attempt to put a distinctive stamp on the movie.

Reshoots, NBooth. Reshoots. (See also: the changes between the Richard Donner and Richard Lester versions of Superman II.)

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I have to say, that I don't think that Disney's project to set up Star Wars as a second cinematic universe alongside Marvel is going to succeed.

Star Wars was showing signs of serious creative exhaustion even before Disney picked it up, and Disney has done nothing since to suggest that they have any ideas as to how to reinvigorate it. If we look at Star Wars, the first and second movies (episodes IV and V) can claim to be really fresh, but even the third (episode VI) was showing signs of creative exhaustion, recycling locations and events from the original even as it struggled across the finish line to complete the story. The prequel trilogy, of course, suffered necessarily in that its main story line was known to us before it started, but beyond that they showed a tendency to recycle and re-use even when it seemed perverse to do so (as examples, the strange decisions to have had C3P0 built by Anakin and to have Boba Fett be a clone of the same original as the clone army). By the end of the prequels, the Star Wars Universe looked a lot smaller and more inbred than it had before.

Far be it from me to fault the commercial calculations behind episode VII, but creatively, it doesn't so much continue the original story as reboot it. When Han, seeing the newest Death-Star-like-object, remarks "So, it's bigger, so what?" I said to myself, "Great question!" and left the theater. For me, as an audience member, the sense of déjà vu was simply overwhelming. There was just no reason for me to be there.

Since then, Disney has launched Rogue One, an interstitial that leaves us with exactly nothing that we didn't have before, and is soon to release another interstitial, that looks to have the same problem. These two interstitial movies are not parallels to the various Marvel single-superhero properties because they can't go anywhere or do anything: they are in a narrative vice between a known past and a known future.

If we look at the Marvel cinematic universe, whatever its faults, it is a toy box full of toys from which new stories can be constructed, and each new Marvel movie adds more toys and opens up new possibilities. Star Wars isn't like that. At its best, it has been a single linear story, and at its worst it is just a recycling and gap-filling of places and events in that story.

I believe that, from a story-telling perspective, the Star Wars "universe" isn't Marvel, it's Pirates of the Caribbean.

Edited by Rachel Anne

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