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[Kids] What's best for 4-5 year-olds?

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opus   

If you showed your daughter My Neighbor Totoro (and maybe Kiki's Delivery Service, though that might be a bit on the slow side), you'd be the coolest dad ever. IMHO, anyways... wink.gif

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My 5-year old (soon to be 6) doesn't like some of the more frightening material in otherwise good films. She loves the Air Bud films, but until recently found the villians too scary, especially the bad Russians in Golden Receiver. So I was surprised that she enjoyed Holes as much as she did. She loves Shrek, A Bug's Life, all of the Pixar films (esp. Finding Nemo), and Stuart Little. I should also say that she requests something from VeggieTales at least 25% of the time she gets a chance to watch something.

The films I'm looking forward to introducing are ones like Anne of Green Gables and The Princess Bride. We tried It's a Wonderful Life at Christmas, but she wasn't too interested. Maybe in a year or two...

It's actually a little depressing to look at a list of major films and realize how few of them are appropriate for her at this age. There are so many ideas that I'd like to protect her from while she's young. I'm looking forward to the suggestions that will be made here.

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Ann D.   

I recently bought An American Tail while on a nostagia kick. I loved this movie when I was younger, and still enjoy it even now. The themes of family and not giving up ("never say never again") are ones that kids this age could easily relate to.

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I asked my 5-year old specifically about her favorite movies this morning, and the one I had forgotten was the first one on her list: Snow Dogs.

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Andrew   

Speaking of Miyazaki, have you previewed Totoro? That's probably my kids' favorite Miyazaki film, with Kiki in 2nd (the witch element has not been a big deal for us or our kids - we just look on it as another bit of fantasy that's so common in good children's tales, with no connection to contemporary New Age spiritualism).

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Thanks, Alan, I'll check out Spirited Away as a possibility for viewing with my 4 year old daughter.

Although she isn't up for much violence at all. She refuses to watch Finding Nemo, having seen the first few minutes with the sharks. My wife and I struggle with this a bit - do we try to help her see that this is not scary (the sharks are nice!), that its just a story, etc, or do we rather appreciate and let her remain in her place of innocence for a while? What is our hurry?

We were thinking of Toy Story 2, but thanks for the heads up about the put-downs of each other. She just danced to "Spoonful of Sugar" in a ballet recital, so we'll probably be seeing Mary Poppins with her soon (though I've never seen Mary Poppins - so I'll want to check it out for violence first).

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DanBuck   

Jimmy Neutron

I didn't expect much from this film but it was on sale for $7 and you can only watch Nemo so many times (although - it's a lot!).

And I was pleasantly surprised. VERY inventive, real heart and a lot of fun. There are minor scary elements. I'd rank it half a step scarier than Nemo, maybe as scary as The Incredibles[/].

Worth a look for sure.

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Interesting viewing experience this week with my almost 5 year old grandson.  We gave him My Neighbor Totoro as an early birthday present (since he lives on the other side of the continent). We sat down to watch it.  It's still good.  Later in the day, when the adults were going to be busy, we put it on for him again and this time with the Japanese audio (just to see how long he'd put up with that).  He stayed just as engrossed with the Japanese.  So, I get it that there is something about animation that fascinates kids and holds their attention more that the story itself.

 

Then, later, I put on The General. As long as I narrated what was happening, he stayed interested. Kept wanting to know who were the good guys and bad guys. Here it seemed like story was more important than visual.

 

Hmmm.

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