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Darren H

Your Top 10 Favorite Films

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M. Leary   

I have a long drive this weekend and am looking forward to thinking about this, as I have about 25 on my swap list and appreciate the nudge here to update my list. Does anyone have the thread link to the last time we did this?

The Wrong Man is a new entry for me this high, and I could spend a long time explaining why. 

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It's always hard to do this.  It's always an internal battle in attempting to define “favorite” for myself as films that I love out of sheer personal pleasure or experiential association vs. “favorite” meaning films that I have grown to love by an expanding appreciation for their depth, meaning and artistic perfection.

Currently, in alphabetical order:

A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1935) - Max Reinhardt & William Dieterle
The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) - Michael Curtiz
Andrei Rublev (1966) - Andrei Tarkovsky
The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) - David Lean
This Land is Mine (1943) - Jean Renoir
Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003) - Peter Weir
The Mirror (1975) - Andrei Tarkovsky
The New World (2005) - Terrence Malick
Ordet (1955) - Carl Theodor Dreyer
The Seventh Seal (1957) - Ingmar Bergman

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Darren H   
5 hours ago, M. Leary said:

I have a long drive this weekend and am looking forward to thinking about this, as I have about 25 on my swap list and appreciate the nudge here to update my list. Does anyone have the thread link to the last time we did this?

I looked for an earlier thread but couldn't find one. Maybe it was back in the Novogate or Chiaroscuro days?

I'm totally intrigued by Jeremy's mention of The Land is Mine, which I've never seen and know nothing about. I intended to watch a bunch of Renoir films a couple summers ago but didn't make much progress.

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Andrew   

In alphabetical order:

The 400 Blows (Truffaut, 1959)

The Big Lebowski (Coen Bros, 1998)

The End of Summer (Ozu, 1961)

The Great Beauty (Sorrentino, 2013)

Grizzly Man (Herzog, 2005)

Kings and Queen (Desplechin, 2004)

Moonrise Kingdom (Anderson, 2012)

Pom Poko (Takahata, 1994)

Red Beard (Kurosawa, 1965)

Spirited Away (Miyazaki, 2001)

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What Jeremy said.  This is hard.  So basically I went with whatever would make me stop what I'm doing if I came across it on TV, or would break previously made plans if I saw that a particular film was playing somewhere nearby.

Alphabetically.....

Apocalypse Now

Beauty and the Beast (Work in Progress) My most cherished LaserDisc

The Big Lebowski

Blade Runner 

Chinatown

The Empire Strikes Back

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Lawrence of Arabia

Melancholia

Ran

Edited by John Drew

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I always find it interesting to know the criteria/mindset for making these lists. I went only with films I own, I've seen the film 3+ times, mentioning a director only once, and (honestly) a bit of prayer.

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8 hours ago, Joel Mayward said:

I always find it interesting to know the criteria/mindset for making these lists.

The great films make us feel as though we didn't really know much about what cinema was until we saw them.

Each of the films I selected created a distinct "before" and "after" in my own understanding of the possibilities of cinema and still manage to take my breath away.

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11 hours ago, J.A.A. Purves said:

It's always an internal battle in attempting to define “favorite” for myself as films that I love out of sheer personal pleasure or experiential association vs. “favorite” meaning films that I have grown to love by an expanding appreciation for their depth, meaning and artistic perfection.

 

Oh, sure. That's why I was inspired to create this list of ten films I can watch at the drop of a hat.ten films I can watch at the drop of a hat, which only has slight overlap with my would-be "great films" ballot.

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Evan C   
21 hours ago, J.A.A. Purves said:

It's always hard to do this.  It's always an internal battle in attempting to define “favorite” for myself as films that I love out of sheer personal pleasure or experiential association vs. “favorite” meaning films that I have grown to love by an expanding appreciation for their depth, meaning and artistic perfection.

I usually fluctuate between both definitions when assembling a list of favorites. Thus I end up with things like Faust, Singin' in the Rain, and The Umbrellas of Cherbourg for the latter, and Rebecca and Sweeney Todd for the former.

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Brian D   

10 of my favorites, 1 per decade…

 

1920’s : Passion of  Joan of Arc

 

1930’s: Make Way for Tomorrow

 

1940’s: His Girl Friday

 

1950’s: Paths of Glory

 

1960’s : Sound of Music               

 

1970’s : Edvard Munch

 

1980’s : Paris, Texas

 

1990’s : A River Runs Through It

 

2000’s : In America

 

2010’s : Of Gods and Men

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These are great responses. Glad to v see MASTER AND COMMANDER: THE FAR SIDE OF THE WORLD on another list, too!

My ten favorite films, today, in no order are:

THE LIFE AQUATIC WITH STEVE ZISSOU

NOTORIOUS

CITIZEN KANE

CLOSE-UP

THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK

THE INCREDIBLES

THE SEARCHERS

SANJURO

A SHOT IN THE DARK

MASTER AND COMMANDER: THE FAR SIDE OF THE WORLD

This is brutal to leave off other favorites like Branagh's HAMLET, any Keaton films, Chaplin's CITY LIGHTS, every other Kurosawa film, and so much more.

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paeng   

Tokyo Story

Pather Panchali

400 Blows

The Phantom Carriage

El Haram

Raise the Red Lantern

Ivan the Terrible

Manila in the Claws of Light

The Official Story

Bicycle Thieves

 

Edited by paeng

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John   

Au hasard Balthasar (Bresson, 1966)

Certified Copy (Kiarostami, 2010)

City Lights (Chaplin, 1931)

The Decalogue (Kieslowski, 1989)

The Immigrant (Gray, 2014)

Late Spring (Ozu, 1949)

The Man Who Planted Trees (Back, 1988)

The Son (Dardenne, 2002)

The Sun Shines Bright (Ford, 1953)

The Third Man (Reed, 1949)

 

Darren, "This Land is Mine" is worth your while. A really interesting film. I had similar aspirations for a Renoir study a while back, and have recently been toying with giving it another go.

 

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