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Your Top 10 Favorite Films


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A friend (@trillmoregirls) is soliciting top ten lists for a film twitter version of the Sight and Sound poll. It had been a while since I did this particular thought experiment, and I was surprised by what I came up with. Five were no-brainers; five could be swapped with 50 others. I'm not sure if I can justify this, but I couldn't bring myself to pick a 21st-century film. I guess I don't trust they'll hold up.

So, what's your top 10? My only rule is you can only name 10 films. Rank/list them however you please. No cheating with honorable mentions or "It pains me to have left off . . ." Of course, it pains you. That's the point.

Sherlock, Jr. (Keaton, 1924)
Frisco Jenny (Wellman, 1932)
The Long Voyage Home (Ford, 1940)
In a Lonely Place (Ray, 1950)
Singin’ in the Rain (Donen and Kelly, 1952)
The Young Girls of Rochefort (Demy, 1967)
Faces (Cassavetes, 1968)
Mirror (Tarkovsky, 1975)
Les baisers de secours (Garrel, 1989)
Beau Travail (Denis, 1999)

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If I were filling out a Sight and Sound ballot, it would probably look like this:

2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)
Carlito's Way (De Palma, 1993)
City Lights (Chaplin, 1931)
Contempt (Godard, 1963)
Hiroshima Mon Amour (Resnais, 1959)
M (Lang, 1931)
Mysteries of Lisbon (Ruiz, 2010)
Napoleon (Gance, 1927)
Once Upon a Time in the West (Leone, 1968)
Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958)

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Oh, yeah. It's time to revisit my top ten list anyway. The top five are pretty set; the latter five could be swapped around. I actually lean pretty heavily toward 21st C films.

Highest to lowest:

The Third Man (Reed, 1949)

Mulholland Drive (Lynch, 2001)

2046 (Wong, 2004)

Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958)

Zodiac (Fincher, 2007)

Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941) 

There Will Be Blood (Anderson, 2007)

Raiders of the Lost Ark (Spielberg, 1981)

Once Upon a Time in the West (Leone, 1968)

The Thin Man (Van Dyke, 1934)

Edited by NBooth
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Here's what my list would be today, in alphabetical order:

The 400 Blows (Truffaut, 1959)

Casablanca (Curtiz, 1942)

The Kid with a Bike (Dardennes, 2012)

Lost in Translation (Coppola, 2003)

Magnolia (Anderson, 1999)

The Night of the Hunter (Laughton, 1955)

Rashomon (Kurosawa, 1950)

Secrets & Lies (Leigh, 1996)

Star Wars (Lucas, 1977)

The Tree of Life (Malick, 2011)

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In alphabetical order:

2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)

4 Months, 3 Weeks & 2 Days (Mungiu, 2007)

Babe (Noonan, 1995)

Fargo (Coens, 1996)

The Godfather Part II (Coppola, 1974)

Of Gods and Men (Beauvois, 2010)

Raiders of the Lost Ark (Spielberg, 1981)

The Son (Dardennes, 2002)

Spirited Away (Miyazaki, 2001)

Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958)

Edited by Benchwarmer
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11 minutes ago, Darren H said:

Two mentions of Raiders of the Lost Ark already. I'm curious, have you both watched it recently? I'm sure I haven't seen it in 20 years and am wondering how much I'd enjoy it today.

I'm pretty sure I last rewatched it about six months ago, so its placement on my list isn't a recent phenomenon (it's actually been on various versions of my top ten for about five years now). It's just that much fun.

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4 minutes ago, Darren H said:

Two mentions of Raiders of the Lost Ark already. I'm curious, have you both watched it recently? I'm sure I haven't seen it in 20 years and am wondering how much I'd enjoy it today.

I enjoy it more as a technical achievement these days than anything else. 

Maybe I've just seen it too many times, or maybe my tastes have evolved, but it just doesn't ring my bell anymore. (My go-to Jones flick these days is actually Temple, if only for that exuberantly mad opening sequence.)

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31 minutes ago, Darren H said:

Two mentions of Raiders of the Lost Ark already. I'm curious, have you both watched it recently? I'm sure I haven't seen it in 20 years and am wondering how much I'd enjoy it today.

I saw it about 4 months ago. I definitely recommend re-visiting it soon.

FWIW, I know at least two other Arts and Faith regulars who are likely to list it in their favourites also.

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Babette's Feast (Axel, 1987)

Blade Runner (Scott, 1982)

Laurence of Arabia (Lean, 1962)

Life of Brian (Jones, 1979)

Mistress America (Baumbach, 2015)

Miller's Crossing (Coen Brothers, 1990)

My Neighbor Totoro (Miyazaki, 1988)

Moonrise Kingdom (Anderson, 2012)

The Iron Giant (Bird, 1999) 

The Descent (Marshall, 2005)

Edited by Cunningham

Scott -- 2nd Story -- Twitter

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Man, I haven't updated mine in a long time. A long, long time. Here's what I've come up with for today, with some horribly painful exclusions.

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (Kubrick, 1968)

BLADE RUNNER (Scott, 1982)

DAYS OF HEAVEN (Malick, 1978)

THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK (Kershner, 1980)

FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE (Young, 1963)

MIRROR (ZERKALO) (Tarkovsky, 1975)

MY NEIGHBOUR TOTORO (TONARI NO TOTORO) (Miyazaki, 1988)

RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK (Spielberg, 1981)

THE THIRD MAN (Reed, 1949)

VERTIGO (Hitchcock, 1958)

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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4 hours ago, Darren H said:

Two mentions of Raiders of the Lost Ark already. I'm curious, have you both watched it recently? I'm sure I haven't seen it in 20 years and am wondering how much I'd enjoy it today.

And now there are two more, tied with 2001 and Vertigo as our most-mentioned films thus far.

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1 hour ago, Rushmore said:

I can confidently name at least four of my top five:

Into Great Silence (Gröning, 2005)
The Tree of Life (Malick, 2011)
2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)
Raising Arizona (Coen brothers, 1987)

Didn't you include The Mill and the Cross in that top five at one point?

 

I published a top 100 on Letterboxd a couple years back, but I've been meaning to update it due to seeing many more films and changing taste. So, I guess this will be a good start. The top six are easy, after that, I'm not as sure.

  1. The Double Life of Veronique (1991, Kieslowski)
  2. WALL-E (2008, Stanton)
  3. Babette's Feast (1987, Axel)
  4. A Man For All Seasons (1966, Zimmermann)
  5. Singin' in the Rain (1952, Donen and Kelly)
  6. Faust (1926, Murnau)
  7. Rebecca (1940, Hitchcock)
  8. The Red Shoes (1948, Powell and Pressburger)
  9. The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964, Demy)
  10. Sweeney Todd: the Demon Barber of Fleet Street (Burton, 2007)

 

 

 

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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2 minutes ago, Evan C said:

Didn't you include The Mill and the Cross in that top five at one point?

Yes, and it would still be in my top 10 or 20, but I'm not so sure now about including it with the other four. (Although my opinion of it hasn't gone down, and I don't have specific films in mind that would replace it. Just following my gut.)

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In chronological order:

You Can't Take it with You (Capra, 1938)

Lawrence of Arabia (Lean, 1962)

The Silence (Bergman, 1963)

2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)

Aguirre, the Wrath of God (Herzog, 1972)

Brazil (Gilliam, 1985)

Henry Fool (Hartley, 1997)

Punch-Drunk Love (P.T. Anderson, 2002)

A Serious Man (Coen Bros., 2009)

Moonrise Kingdom (W. Anderson, 2012)

 

"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

"If apologetics could prove God, I would lose all faith in Him." -- Josie

"What if--just what if--the very act of storytelling is itself redemptive? What if gathering up the scraps and fragments of a disordered life and binding them between the pages of a book in all of their fragmentary disorder is itself a gambit against that disorder?" -- NBooth

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Can't do this. Grading papers right now. So really off the top of my head:

 

The Mirror

Beau Travail

The New World

L'Atalante

Playtime

City Lights

The Cyclist

The Wrong Man

Mothlight

In Praise of Love

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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I've seen L'ATALANTE twice, and I think it should have topped our films about marriage list. It's amazing. Count me among Jean Vigo's big fans. ZERO DE CONDUIT is also an all time great film, without which the French New Wave doesn't exist.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

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