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Not a lot of info yet, but still exciting.

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Universal and Focus Features won a worldwide rights auction for an untitled film that Paul Thomas Anderson wrote and will direct, re-teaming him with There Will Be Blood star Daniel Day-Lewis. Focus won the deal after a ferocious bidding battle with Fox Searchlight. The deal puts the lie to press reports speculating that buyer appetite has vanished going into Toronto.

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The new PT Anderson picture is set in the fashion world in London in the 1950s, and the plan is to start production early next year and release it in late 2017.

 

Edited by Tyler

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According to his spokeswoman in a statement to Variety it is, but you never know...maybe he changes his mind eventually. Of course he could be like Sean Connery, who actually kept his retirement surprisingly.

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Well, Connery turned 73 the year that his last film (The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen) came out, whereas Day-Lewis is currently 60, so... I guess that's not *too* big a gap, but I do think Connery's commitment to his retirement is not that surprising.

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The title is officially Phantom Thread. The first trailer:

And the first poster:

image.png.53b136e0a0b484bf2004edafb1974f76.png

Edited by Joel Mayward

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So, this is the first time PTA has ventured out of America in his subject matter. Interesting.

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Finally saw this last night, and it's exquisite. The kind of film I immediately wanted to rewatch as soon as it ended, as I wanted to revisit the story and characters, as well as better appreciate the beauty of the environments and costumes. And the Jonny Greenwood score is magnificent. I hope to write a full review, but as an initial reaction, it seems PTA-and-DDL films are *much* more interesting to me than PTA and Joaquin Phoenix.

Edited by Joel Mayward

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I really loved it as well.  A few bits of dialogue rang false, and I thought the 4th act dragged a little, but otherwise all the pieces clicked wonderfully.  The Jonny Greenwood score is gorgeous, probably the best thing I've heard at the movies in 12 months.  And the dark humor, especially in the second half, was delectable.  I'm glad that Day-Lewis and Manville got their Oscar noms, but Krieps deserved one as well.

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Mike_tn wrote:
: And then use of the F-word suggested a more modern tham 50s time.

The f-word is centuries old. Is there a particular *way* it was used here that felt anachronistic for the 1950s? (Have you heard the story about J.R.R. Tolkien reading sections of The Lord of the Rings to the Inklings before it was published in the 1950s, and one of the Inklings exclaiming "Not another f---ing elf!"?)

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Mike_tn wrote:
: My point of view above is probably biased/uninformed and was more a recognition of word use in old vs new film.

Yeah, movies were generally censored back in the '50s to eliminate stuff like that. You could barely even say words like "damn" and "hell". But these words did exist in the language at that time. (Military expressions like "FUBAR" and "SNAFU" -- which were very popular during World War II, if not earlier -- were based on expressions like "F---ed Up Beyond All Recognition" and "Situation Normal All F---ed Up", respectively. And that was in the 1940s, the decade before this film is set.)

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Mik_tn wrote:
: I always thought foobar use was rooted in program codes but they probably got it from the military.

I vaguely recall that the soldiers in Saving Private Ryan said "FUBAR" a lot. I can't recall any other World War II movies that have used the expression, though I was familiar with it before I saw that movie (partly because I was already a fan of books like Jesse Sheidlower's The F Word, which catalogues all the ways that the f-word has been used over the centuries).

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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