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Ron Reed

TWIN PEAKS

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Big news (well, rumors, anyway) for fans of "Twin Peaks" ... especially regarding that hard-to-get pilot episode:

From The Digital Bits:

10/25/04

A lot of you have been asking us when Twin Peaks: Season Two was finally going to be released on DVD. We'd heard rumors that Paramount had the rights (or would have them soon), but the studio had been quiet on the subject and hasn't commented officially. That said, LynchNet.com recently posted this bit of information on their site:

"Our sources within Paramount say it's almost a sure thing that you'll see Season Two, as well as a re-release of Season One with the Pilot included, released by Paramount as soon as the rights revert back to them around September 2005. The current rights holder, Lion's Gate (formally Artisan) has no plans to further exploit Twin Peaks or any of it's Spelling Entertainment titles due to the short time frame they have before the rights are lost."

Spelling Entertainment titles would obviously include Beverly Hills 90210 and Melrose Place. This is completely unofficial and we can't vouch for LynchNet's sources, but as I said, we HAVE heard that Paramount was going to be involved in a DVD release of Twin Peaks at some point in the future, so this would seem to corroborate that information. We'll do some digging and keep you up to date on anything we learn here.

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OK, I've watched most of Lynch's films, but I've never seen this series. I know there's also a film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me. There's been talk about the pilot episode and how it's different from the pilot in the dvd? I would appreciate any advice about how I should watch this series--i.e. which dvds to watch, should I watch the series then the movie, etc. How many seasons were there?

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Kyle   

I finished watching season one on DVD today. I'm disappointed that I watched it over a year, so I think I'll have to go back to episode one and start over. Not that I'll mind too much, it's such a great series.

I did a quick internet search to find out if season two had been released on DVD yet when I stumbled across this. (You will have to scroll down a bit to find the info on season one and two.)

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I watched every episode of the first two seasons of this show, if memory serves. (Hey, did it even last two seasons?) Some great stuff, especially the Lynch-directed episodes, which are such standouts that make the rest of show seem pedestrian at times.

Edited by Christian

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I watched every episode of the first two seasons of this show, if memory serves. (Hey, did it even last two seasons?) Some great stuff, especially the Lynch-directed episodes, which are such standouts they make the rest of show seem pedestrian at times.

Yep. Season 1 was uniformly brilliant. Season 2 started off very, very strongly (up to and including the episode where the identity of "Bob" was revealed; to this day I can't hear Louis Armstrong's "What a Wonderful World" and not get the creeps). But then it degenerated into weirdness for the sake of weirdess, only to be redeemed somewhat in the final episode.

But I'll be glad to have the new set. My old VHS tapes (made when the show originally aired) certainly need to be replaced.

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Season 1 was uniformly brilliant. Season 2 started off very, very strongly (up to and including the episode where the identity of "Bob" was revealed; to this day I can't hear Louis Armstrong's "What a Wonderful World" and not get the creeps). But then it degenerated into weirdness for the sake of weirdess, only to be redeemed somewhat in the final episode.

My review exactly.

Lynch's episodes were all five-star episodes. Mark Frost's episodes were usuall four-to-five-star episodes. And there were some other guys who contributed memorable stuff. But after season two, it really tested my loyalty. Ahhh, but the finale... what a fantastic cataclysm. And the last moment of the series is oh so perversely right.

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Anders   

Woo hoo! I'm ecstatic.

My brothers and I became big fans when we got the First Season on DVD through Zip.ca! (the Canadian Netflix). Even our mother sat down and was captivated (and she's not generally a fan of more "dark" fare, but still enjoyed it).

Agent Dale Cooper is now one of my favourite characters, and I think it's perhaps one of the best Lynch projects I've ever seen.

Oh, and the fact is that we haven't even watched the Second Season yet! I don't know how that killer cliff hanger resolves or anything, so this is exciting...and sad.

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Jeffrey Overstreet wrote:

: Here comes THE COMPLETE SERIES on DVD!

Will this include either of the movies (i.e. the theatrical version of the pilot episode, which has a different ending than the televised version; and the Fire Walk with Me theatrical prequel)?

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Sad news.

Farewell, Major Briggs.

I've been watching the Twin Peaks "gold box" DVDs, and they're wonderful. Don S. Davis's performance as Major Briggs is one of the highlights.

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Sad news.

Farewell, Major Briggs.

I've been watching the Twin Peaks "gold box" DVDs, and they're wonderful. Don S. Davis's performance as Major Briggs is one of the highlights.

Read this today, and tried to find some Major Briggs quotes... I only came across one, but I think it's pretty good...

Major Briggs: Achievement is its own reward, pride obscures it.
Edited by Baal_T'shuvah

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Tyler   

I've been catching up with the series (tried a couple times before when it was streaming from CBS, but they didn't include the pilot episode because of some production company dispute, so it was *really* hard to follow). Tonight I figured out that Zooey and Emily Deschanel's parents both worked on the show. Mom (Mary Jo) played Eileen Hayward, and dad (Caleb) directed a few episodes.

BTW, why is this in the Film forum?

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Yeah. And the girls got their mother's eyes.

Caleb Deschanel didn't just direct Twin Peaks episodes. He was director of photography for such wildly different films as The Black Stallion, The Passion of the Christ, and National Treasure.

And he directed his daughter Emily in an episode of Bones.

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M. Leary   

Yeah. And the girls got their mother's eyes.

Caleb Deschanel didn't just direct Twin Peaks episodes....

I had never made that connection. Nifty family.

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Persona   

I've been catching up with the series (tried a couple times before when it was streaming from CBS, but they didn't include the pilot episode because of some production company dispute, so it was *really* hard to follow). Tonight I figured out that Zooey and Emily Deschanel's parents both worked on the show. Mom (Mary Jo) played Eileen Hayward, and dad (Caleb) directed a few episodes.

BTW, why is this in the Film forum?

The series ended as a film. It was a prequel called Fire Walk With Me.

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Persona wrote:

: The series ended as a film. It was a prequel called Fire Walk With Me.

It also began as a film. The theatrical version of the pilot episode played at the Vancouver International Film Festival, and perhaps elsewhere, before the broadcast version aired on TV.

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Tyler   

Ugh. Avoid the second season if at all possible.

I'm about 2/3 of the way through it. I'm still watching it because there are a few things I'd like to have cleared up, even if the explanations aren't all that satisfying. FWIW, I haven't noticed a huge dropoff in the quality of the show yet.

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Persona   

The final show of the second season is the best it ever was.

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Tyler   

I finished the series today. The last episode made up for all the annoying, pointless subplots that never went anywhere after Laura Palmer's murder was wrapped up.

Anyone care to try talking me out of watching Fire Walk With Me?

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OK, just finished the first and second seasons after working at it for a month or two. Does anyone care to try to help me decipher the last 20 minutes of the series finale? Perhaps this would be best done offline somehow, or perhaps by pointing me to links that help those who are not Lynch-literate have even a remote idea what occurred in the long Black Lodge sequence? Thanks in advance for your mercy to someone who just doesn't get it, or at least not fully.

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NBooth   

I watched through this show last year and loved it. I think it's about time for another go.

Twin Peaks Online has a handy FAQ, andI've found Glastonberry Grove helpful as well. The latter has a quick-read mythos section.

I really need to go back and watch that last episode; it's been nearly a year, and the details (beyond a general feeling of mind-blowingness) have slipped my memory. As I recall, the movie helped clear everything up a (very little) bit, since it makes clear that

the Black Lodge is outside of time--Dale shows up and so does the waitress he was romancing--the Lodge Dwellers feed on dark energies (Garmonbozia--pain and suffering), and that the Man From Another Place is somehow Mike's arm (!)

A recent interview with Bob Engles was revelatory, but not necessarily in a good way (a poster here summarized the interview. On my browser, it's the last post on the page):

He confirmed that BOB, MIKE and the other Lodge spirits originated from Garmonbozia, a planet covered entirely in creamed corn and where everything moved backwards. He said that he revealed this to the guys from Wrapped in Plastic in an interview for their final issue, but they didn’t use it (because he thought they wanted to keep the secret to themselves).

Not very helpful or interesting. But there's also this:

I didn’t quite understand this bit 100%, but he did say that the key to Cooper’s rescue would have involved time travel; that we all have Black Lodge doppelgangers, and they all exist about 2 minutes (or hours? I don’t remember which one, sorry guys) behind us in time, which is why we don’t see them. So rescuing Cooper would have involved going back in time 2 minutes or hours to find his other self. (If that makes sense, I hope.)

My own pet theory is that

the Black Lodge and the White Lodge are the same place, and that both are somehow projections of the evil/good that men do. To enter the Lodge is to enter the subconscious, and to be confronted with terrifying possibilities. Though perhaps the Black Lodge is purgatory--this is hinted at in the movie, where Laura dies, enters the Black Lodge, and is ushered by Dale Cooper into the waiting arms of an angel).

It's helpful to watch Twin Peaks in connection with other Lynch films, I think; in the end, the Lynchian resolution nearly always depends on a descent into the Lodge (be it Club Silencio, the burning cabin in Lost Highway or Jeffery Beaumont's night of terror) which is analogous to the human trying to delve into itself and understand the subconscious. It's a confrontation with things that don't make rational sense and with the darker urges of the human heart, a process that leaves the characters (and the viewer!) off-kilter and not quite certain what just happened. Which is why I suspect that Twin Peaks would have gotten far less interesting if the answers suggested by Engles had ever come to fruition.

Edited by NBooth

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M. Leary   
It's helpful to watch Twin Peaks in connection with other Lynch films, I think; in the end, the Lynchian resolution nearly always depends on a descent into the Lodge (be it Club Silencio, the burning cabin in Lost Highway or Jeffery Beaumont's night of terror) which is analogous to the human trying to delve into itself and understand the subconscious.

I totally agree. And I think this is why I have found Lynch less and less interesting over the years. It is hard to shake the nuances of his vision, especially as his films are so informed by Lynch the painter. But the typical Lynchian resolution, which is about our descent into the subconscious, really isn't that interesting when repeated over and over again.

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