Ron Reed

TWIN PEAKS

187 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

This series would have grabbed me more, without the supernatural/horror elements--but it’s interesting how many actors were also in Star Trek shows and films…

Madchen Amick (Anya in “The Dauphin”)—Michael J. Anderson (Rumpelstiltskin)--Richard Beymer -- John Billingsley (Dr. Phlox) –Frank Collison --Cullen Douglas--Miguel  Ferrer (commanded the Excelsior, ST3)–Patrick Fischler– Meg Foster (Jake Sisko’s “Muse”) - Hank Harris (Jack in “Carbon Creek”, ENT)-- Ashley Judd (Wesley Crusher’s first kiss)-- Robert Knepper (Wyatt, Troi’s fiance)—David Lander --Rob Mars -- Derek Mears --Wendy Robie –Brenda Strong --Carel Struycken (Lwaxana Troi’s valet, Mr. Homn) – John Savage (Capt. Ransom, VOY) – David Warner (Gorkon in ST3)--Ray Wise (Liko in “Who watches the watchers”)

[Shouldn’t this thread be in the TV section?]

Edited by phlox

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3 hours ago, phlox said:

This series would have grabbed me more, without the supernatural/horror elements--but it’s interesting how many actors were also in Star Trek shows and films…

Madchen Amick (Anya in “The Dauphin”)—Michael J. Anderson (Rumpelstiltskin)--Richard Beymer -- John Billingsley (Dr. Phlox) –Frank Collison --Cullen Douglas--Miguel  Ferrer (commanded the Excelsior, ST3)–Patrick Fischler– Meg Foster (Jake Sisko’s “Muse”) - Hank Harris (Jack in “Carbon Creek”, ENT)-- Ashley Judd (Wesley Crusher’s first kiss)-- Robert Knepper (Wyatt, Troi’s fiance)—David Lander --Rob Mars -- Derek Mears --Wendy Robie –Brenda Strong --Carel Struycken (Lwaxana Troi’s valet, Mr. Homn) – John Savage (Capt. Ransom, VOY) – David Warner (Gorkon in ST3)--Ray Wise (Liko in “Who watches the watchers”)

[Shouldn’t this thread be in the TV section?]

The supernatural/horror elements were - for me - what made Twin Peaks so memorable. I haven't been able to catch this 3rd season yet, but the original is still the most frightening thing I've ever seen; like the nightmare of a sensitive soul, or the fantasy of a perverse one. I know a lot of people remember it for the Log Lady or the damn fine cherry pie and coffee or the homespun, gosh-darn decent facade of small-town America, but for me it all resonates with an almost unbearable sadness. I suppose that's not too surprising if you consider the main storyline. I still love it though. Should probably rewatch to see how I feel about it eight years on from my initial viewing; I was a pretty sheltered and very young man the first time I saw it.

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2 hours ago, Anodos said:

 I know a lot of people remember it for the Log Lady or the damn fine cherry pie and coffee or the homespun, gosh-darn decent facade of small-town America, but for me it all resonates with an almost unbearable sadness. I suppose that's not too surprising if you consider the main storyline. 

Indeed, based on Fire Walk With Me, I would argue that the gosh-darn decent facade is only important insofar as you have the main storyline. The supernatural bits (if that's what they are) are interesting precisely insofar as they underline the essential horror of the Laura Palmer case. Indeed, BOB is at one point posited as "the evil that men do," and although on a strictly literal level he's more than that, he certainly isn't less than that. I would argue that the supernatural elements, however they function on a plot level, demand to be read metaphorically as, for instance, the seamy underside of small-town America, rather than literally (that is to say, Twin Peaks operates on a wholly different register than, say, The X-Files).

I've wondered about this going in TV as well, but since Lynch is apparently thinking of--and, more importantly, structuring--the new season like an 18-hour-long movie, I think a case could be made that this thread is now more properly situated in this forum.

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15 hours ago, Anodos said:

 Should probably rewatch to see how I feel about it eight years on from my initial viewing; I was a pretty sheltered and very young man the first time I saw it.

Please do! I have watched it several times since I watched the Bravo run as a teenager. Most of it ages very, very well (excepting the spotty bits in Season 2). But I keep coming back to it the same way I do the novels or theology texts I revisit as I get older. It is not that I find anything new; it is just good to treasure my connection to the work.

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phlox wrote:
: . . . Miguel  Ferrer (commanded the Excelsior, ST3) . . .

He didn't command it (that was Captain Stiles); he was the executive officer. :)

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Posted (edited)

3 hours ago, Peter T Chattaway said:

phlox wrote:
: . . . Miguel  Ferrer (commanded the Excelsior, ST3) . . .

He didn't command it (that was Captain Stiles); he was the executive officer. :)

Woops...sorry!

Here is Catherine Coulson (the Log Lady) working as camera assistant on ST 2 

BS2.jpg

Edited by phlox

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Is there anything on television as striking as the shot of Dougie-Cooper shedding a single tear? I'm serious--MacLachlan's face, and particularly his eyes, held worlds of melancholy in that one scene.

I didn't catch this live last night, so I watched it this morning. Twice. Plotty things are starting to come together a bit, all tying back to Twin Peaks, ultimately. It feels like the show is starting to click into a long-term pace, which is good because--as much as I loved the first two episodes--eighteen hours of Black Lodge stuff would probably not be the best way to go.

The Return has ruined television for me, though; I'm three episodes behind on American Gods--a show that apparently only has eight episodes, anyway? So it's near the end. And I haven't watched more than two episodes of House of Cards. I just...I can't work up the interest. Not with Twin Peaks around.

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Agent Cooper, Holy Fool.

I wish they were still releasing this in two-episode blocks. I want to stay in that groove for longer than an hour.

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There were two shots in this last episode which I can't recall seeing elsewhere in Lynch:

A night shot, wide, of Albert in really heavy rainfall. Excepting a few points in

Inland Empire, Lynch does not film scenes with heavy rain.

A very Malick, wandering, POV, shot of Carl looking up at trees dappled by sunlight

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15 minutes ago, M. Leary said:

There were two shots in this last episode which I can't recall seeing elsewhere in Lynch:

 

  Hide contents

A night shot, wide, of Albert in really heavy rainfall. Excepting a few points in

Inland Empire, Lynch does not film scenes with heavy rain.

 

 

  Hide contents

A very Malick, wandering, POV, shot of Carl looking up at trees dappled by sunlight

 

Both of those were great. We've not seen enough of Dern's character yet, but Carl is fascinating to me.

His ability--derived, apparently, from his childhood abduction as narrated in 

The Secret History (he was one of three children abducted; the Log Lady was another and the third is dead) to see the soul/garmonbozia leaving the dead child really puts him in a different position from that he occupied in FWWM. In the movie, he's just a colorful side-character; here, what with the meditation/treegazing and his attempt to comfort the mother, Carl is looking much more like one of these agents of empathy that Lynch is stocking the season with--Carl, Sonny Jim, the nameless security guard who takes Dougie home, the limo driver.... Every episode is overshadowed by Laura Palmer, simply because her face literally opens each one in a ghostly manifestation during the title sequence. And the notion of empathizing with or bearing with the suffering of others is central to the series now. I mean, it always has been--those uncompromising shots of Sarah Palmer weeping demand some sort of response--but it's more foregrounded here, less drowned out by eccentricities (or, rather, the eccentricities play more completely into the theme). Another example: Truman's wife, who was introduced--like Nadine--as a shrill caricature, but who is revealed in this episode to be deeply broken, which gives Truman's responses both to her and others around him a new dimension as well (his passivity is in some sense a way of loving his wife, but it's also possibly his own response to his son's suicide).

All television requires patience, and serialized television particularly so, but it's interesting to see the ways in which this series pushes back against contemporary recap culture. It's virtually impossible to make a hot-take out of it, because the story is rolling out so slowly and deliberately that any snap judgement is apt to be undone in the very next chapter.

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Vikram Murthi: In Praise of Dougie

The superficial pleasures of Dougie-Coop begin with Kyle MacLachlan’s performance, some of the best work he’s done in his career. Channeling characters like Peter Sellers’ Chance in Being There, Spielberg’s E.T., and Jacques Tati’s Monsieur Hulot, MacLachlan mines the full range of human emotion with his blank expression and clumsy movements. He approaches Dougie-Coop like walking Play-Doh, something to be molded by his environment, even as Agent Cooper lies dormant inside. By solely reacting to the actions of others, MacLachlan trades in his characteristic poise for stubborn passivity, in turn negating the traits that defined Agent Cooper. This minimalist technique succeeds on its own merits, but it also makes the smallest gestures — an imitated thumbs-up, a gracious smile, or a tearful face — feel remarkably significant. Every episode featuring Dougie-Coop adds new weight to MacLachlan’s performance, providing him with more avenues for subtle emotional engagement.

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This is Lynch's magnum opus. I started grinning about fifteen minutes into tonight's episode and didn't stop until the end. Just...beautiful and odd and offputting and wonderful. Thank God for Lynch and Frost and thank God for Showtime. 

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