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A Very Long Engagement

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Sir DougC the Brave has endured the bleeping wands of the Department of Homeland Security in order to bring you this sneak peek of A Very Long Engagement, the new film by Jean-Pierre Jeunet, starring Audrey Tautou.

Way to go, Doug.

But I ask you, did you endure all of that and then get assaulted by the blasting music of a local radio station while they ask inane trivia questions, bounce around like cheerleaders, and throw t-shirts at the crowd... people who are jumping to catch them and barking and bellowing like a bunch of seals crying for herring? Did you have ushers pushing concessions-carts up and down the aisles calling out for people to take this last chance to buy a super-size soda and popcorn?

It can be worse. Believe me!


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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"Sorry! There was an error: The account . . . has been blocked from access to this service."


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Ah, now I know why I'm getting all these incoming hits from A&F . smile.gif

Thanks for the plug, Jeffrey. No bouncing seals or barking ushers--it was definitely a test screening rather than an official premiere. Some of the color timing was still off.

I'll be interested to hear what you think of the film. You liked Am

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For folks having trouble, try going straight to http://filmjourney.weblogger.com/.

DougC, I admired the inventiveness of Amelie, but I'm a much bigger fan of Delicatessen. I enjoy Jeunet for about 90 minutes, and then the style starts trying my patience, due to the shallowness of the story.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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I endorse that appraisal 100%. I still love Delicatessen, though.

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Jeffrey Overstreet wrote:

: For folks having trouble, try going straight to filmjourney.com.

Already tried that; doesn't work.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I enjoy Jeunet for about 90 minutes, and then the style starts trying my patience, due to the shallowness of the story.

I'm in the same camp -- except I enjoy his style for 30 minutes, tops.

I'm not eager to see his latest film.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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I'm looking forward to this, not because I'm a fan of Jeunet (though in a sense I am), but because I am head over heels for Sebastian Japrisot, who wrote the book. I can't think of a more bizarre combination though, telling Japrisot's story through Jeunet's lens. I've read five or six of Japrisot's books and they don't exactly cry out for that.

And it's interesting that Tautou in the film plays "a woman with a severe limp" while Mathilde Donnay in the book is "confined to a wheelchair since childhood," as the Amazon review of the book reminds me. Talk about the power of film! smile.gif

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Ha--that's really funny, in the film she actually plays up her disability in order to manipulate people. She only uses a wheelchair whenever she wants to look pathetic and/or harmless.

I'm really curious how it compares to the novel, because I find it hard to believe the novel would adopt such an ironic, absurd tone for the story. And there are lines in the film I just can't imagine any author writing, like when someone tries to explain something to Tautou, and she shoots back, "I'm lame, not dim!"

I kid you not.

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Trailer online.

I was having some trouble with this page, so the trailer had a "ghosting" effect throughout. Maybe that was just my system.

And, BTW, there are no English subtitles on this particular trailer.


Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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The trailer set to hit U.S theatres has been released. Very crafty of Warner Bros. There is no indication that this is a foreign language film. No scenes with dialogue, apart from an old man calling out the names of the two main protagonists. It's all visual, with an English narration.


Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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Jeffrey Overstreet wrote:

: I enjoy Jeunet for about 90 minutes, and then the style starts trying my patience,

: due to the shallowness of the story.

FWIW, I began checking my watch at the 60-minute mark during this particular film. The first word that comes to mind when thinking of this film, for me, is "boring". There are occasional moments of creativity or amusement -- e.g., I like the running gag with the mail carrier who loves skidding to a stop on the gravel -- but the story itself doesn't do much for me. For one thing, it gets off to a shaky start, telling us all about these five WWI soldiers who are have been sentenced to death for self-mutilation (in a bid to be sent home from the trenches) but without settling its focus on any particular one of them, and then when it DOES settle its focus on one particular man -- or, rather, on the woman (Tautou) who is searching for him because she really, really wants to believe he is alive -- the film doesn't really give us any reason to care about or believe in their relationship. And it's pretty obvious throughout the film that Jeunet is much more interested in cool gadgetry (a wooden hand, a hidden gun) and creative, lurid ways to kill people (the death of one person by mirror shards comes to mind) than he is in matters of the heart or the larger issues of class and warfare.

Doug C wrote:

: And there are lines in the film I just can't imagine any author writing, like when

: someone tries to explain something to Tautou, and she shoots back, "I'm lame,

: not dim!"

Really? I didn't catch that line. Which scene was that?


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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twitch wrote:

: . . . it's the least Jeunet of Jeunet's films . . .

Eh!? The calculated absurdism and romantic sentiment seemed of a piece with Amelie, at least.

In other news ...

- - -

'Amelie' Director Defends French Credentials

The new film "A Very Long Engagement" was filmed and set in France and uses French actors, extras and technicians. And now its French director is fighting in French courts to prove his film is French. Director Jean-Pierre Jeunet of "Amelie" fame is battling to prove his credentials after a court challenge by rival producers who want to block his new film from French government subsidies because they say it received U.S. funding.

Reuters, November 11


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Oh, it's still a Jeunet film, but I found the tone very different from his other stuff. It's much darker and as one of the production people points out in the notes they gave out at the screening here it's the first time he's made a film that isn't a fairy tale ...

I saw that funding fight article, too ... and here I thought stupid stuff like that only happened here in Canada ... our government funders have a check list of items that qualify as 'Canadian' and if the film doesn't have enough 'Canadian content' you don't get funded ... and we wonder why most of our talent moves to the US ...

twitch wrote:

: . . . it's the least Jeunet of Jeunet's films . . .

Eh!?  The calculated absurdism and romantic sentiment seemed of a piece with Amelie, at least.

In other news ...

- - -

'Amelie' Director Defends French Credentials

The new film "A Very Long Engagement" was filmed and set in France and uses French actors, extras and technicians. And now its French director is fighting in French courts to prove his film is French. Director Jean-Pierre Jeunet of "Amelie" fame is battling to prove his credentials after a court challenge by rival producers who want to block his new film from French government subsidies because they say it received U.S. funding.

Reuters, November 11


twitch

independent and cult film.

news. reviews. discussion.

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twitch wrote:

: Oh, it's still a Jeunet film, but I found the tone very different from his other stuff.

: It's much darker . . .

Really? I thought the relative brightness of Amelie was the aberration, not the standard. I don't remember Delicatessen very well, but certainly City of the Lost Children and Alien Resurrection were fairly dark, weren't they?


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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twitch wrote:

: Oh, it's still a Jeunet film, but I found the tone very different from his other stuff.

: It's much darker . . .

Really?  I thought the relative brightness of Amelie was the aberration, not the standard.  I don't remember Delicatessen very well, but certainly City of the Lost Children and Alien Resurrection were fairly dark, weren't they?

The other stuff is dark in a very silly way ... this one's just plain dark.

And I like to pretend Alien Resurrection never happened.


twitch

independent and cult film.

news. reviews. discussion.

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I watched another 2004 Tautou offering last night (Nowhere to go but Up a.k.a. Happy End) and it was quite simply terrible. Now at least I'm convinced that not everything she's in is brilliant, but I'm still somewhat interested in this director/actress re-pairing. I really liked Amelie, but I don't really expect another film of that quality. I'd settle for something that's just interesting.

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Jeunet joined a Seattle crowd for a screening last night.

It's a taxing, exhausting film. Imagine Saving Private Ryan and Amelie colliding at top speed in an intersection. I know that's hard to picture, but that's the best way to describe the movie. Huge, awe-inspiring imagery; a good deal (too much) graphic war footage; dozens of Jeunet's famous tangents and flashbacks; scenes of such crowded visual details that it rivals and even surpasses Moulin Rouge and Amelie; a performance by Tautou that isn't different enough from her Amelie performance; another fine soundtrack by Badlamenti.

It's overwhelming, tough to process, and hard to recommend considering how intense and gratuitous some of the footage is.

But as a lovers-separated-by-war movie, I'd be just as interested in seeing it again as I would Cold Mountain. The highs of the film, primarily aesthetic, are very very high. And the lows are considerably low. It's up to you.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Jeffrey Overstreet wrote:

: Imagine Saving Private Ryan and Amelie colliding at top speed in an intersection.

: I know that's hard to picture, but that's the best way to describe the movie.

Throw in Paths of Glory as a wounded pedestrian bystander and you'd have it just about right.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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A performance by Tautou that isn't different enough from her Amelie performance...

Why would she need to do something different from Am


In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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