Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

embryonic stem cell death

27 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

From the "Flaming Kerry" thread...

There are thousands of fertilized eggs sitting in fertility clinics that are going to be tossed out into the trash... they are no longer available for stem cell research. What? You thought maybe people were fertilizing eggs EXPRESSLY FOR THE PURPOSE OF STEM CELL RESEARCH? Mr. Brooks' abject stupidity makes me gag.

This threw me at the time because I don't know nearly as much about this subject as I should. Certainly, destroying even these lives in the name of research is anathema to me, though not necessarily MORE so than destroying them simply by tossing them in the trash, and if that's all that Kerry's promises to provide federal funding for embryonic stem cell reearch meant, it might not necessarily mean more deaths, or lives being created in order to be destroyed.

Apparently, though, whether by fertilizing eggs, or by cloning embryos -- and apparently we DO clone human embryos, though so far no successful effort has been made to get a cloned embryo to grow up into a born-alive baby -- embryonic stem cell research, and much more embryonic stem cell therapy, DOES mean creating life in order to destroy it.

We are doing it now. Here's an example from Chicago. Here's another from North Korea.

From a CNN.com interview with Dr. Sanjay Gupta:

Q. What is embryonic stem cell research and how is it performed?

A. For the first time, scientists are actually creating embryos for the sole purpose of research. Embryonic stem cell research involves collecting undifferentiated cells from embryos. These cells can differentiate into many different cell lines, including cardiac, neuro, or even skeletal muscle. The cells themselves are programmed into a cell line using stimulation of growth techniques.

Just a little research online turned up much more documentation from respectable, neutral sources.

This is happening now with private funds. John Kerry wants to fund it on the federal level.

This is potentially far, far bigger than abortion. Abortion is an atrocity of circumstance -- a circumstantial response to an unwanted pregnancy. However many thousands of abortions occur every day, each abortion is essentially an isolated tragedy, something that happened because one particular woman happened to get pregnant.

Federally funded embryonic stem cell research threatens to be a programmatic atrocity -- an industry employing any number of people in the business of creating human beings in order to destroy them in the laboratory.

Beyond that, because patients reject embryonic stem cells that are not a genetic match, whatever embryonic stem-cell therapies come out of the research will require patients to donate genetic material that will then be used to generate embryonic clones to become new donors.

Why does federal funding make such a difference? It seems that the private sector isn't coming through here, in large part for the excellent reason that, apparently, adult stem-cell therapies are already delivering results and no one has yet accomplished any therapeutic results with embryonic stem cells.

I don't care what your beef with Bush is. If you're pro-life, this is bigger than that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

SDG wrote:

: This is potentially far, far bigger than abortion. Abortion is an atrocity of

: circumstance -- a circumstantial response to an unwanted pregnancy. . . .

: Federally funded embryonic stem cell research threatens to be a programmatic

: atrocity -- an industry employing any number of people in the business of

: creating human beings in order to destroy them in the laboratory.

Good point.

FWIW, I'm not sure whether this merits an 'Ahem' or not.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

Anyone see 20/20 on Friday?

http://abcnews.go.com/2020/GiveMeABreak/st...d=207216&page=1

Within his "Gimme a break" segment,

John Stossel emphasized the difference between supporting stem cell research vs supporting the government funding of stem cell research. He definitely was against forced federal funding for research and said that the rich and famous like Bill Gates and Brad Pitt, who are pursuading voters, could themselves get together and fund the research themselves. ($3 billion dollars in California?)

But, what exactly is the current law on stem cell research?

So do private institutions currently have the right to breed embryos solely for stem cell research purposes?

Edited by run

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

So do private institutions currently have the right to breed embryos solely for stem cell research purposes?

Yes. The issue being debated is Federal Funding for the destruction of new embryos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

And is it different from Federal funding of military, which as a pacifist, I'd rather not do? Should we be able to earmark our taxes? Or does living in community mean we have to hold our noses?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

And is it different from Federal funding of military, which as a pacifist, I'd rather not do?  Should we be able to earmark our taxes?  Or does living in community mean we have to hold our noses?

I would think that living as a nation means that we have a say in how our taxes should be spent - we write our congresscritters, we form coalitions, and we vote. You have every right to agitate to not have tax money spent on the military. And when you are outvoted (which you will be) you have every right to make as big a stink about it as you can - though as a Christian, you still need to pay your taxes.

And that's what I plan to do when it comes to stem cell research. I am agitating about it, trying to persuade others, and praying that Bush wins the election. In the end, I will pay my taxes if I lose on this, but I will never stop raising the issue.

It's not so much holding our noses - which implies passive acceptance - as it is raising a stink! smile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

Welp, it didn't get mine or my wife's vote, but:

Proposition 71 passes in California.

Edited by Jason Bortz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

That's ok, it got two votes at our house.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Cool, we cancelled eachother out!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Steven: I love your sig line!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Wow, thanks for calling this out Alan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Looks like South Korea just might have beaten the US to the punch.

Paralyzed woman walks again after stem cell therapy

But here's the important thing to note:

SEOUL (AFP) - A South Korean woman paralyzed for 20 years is walking again after scientists say they repaired her damaged spine using stem cells derived from umbilical cord blood.

Hwang Mi-Soon, 37, had been bedridden since damaging her back in an accident two decades ago.

Last week her eyes glistened with tears as she walked again with the help of a walking frame at a press conference where South Korea (news - web sites) researchers went public for the first time with the results of their stem-cell therapy.

They said it was the world's first published case in which a patient with spinal cord injuries had been successfully treated with stem cells from umbilical cord blood.

So here's the billion dollar question - if further research proves that this technique works over embryonic stem cells, how would this affect the research done in this country?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Eggs 'fertilised' without sperm

Scientists have devised a way to make human eggs behave as if they have been fertilised - without using sperm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Could this make ethical objections against stem cell research nonexistent?

Doubtful, but it could make them irrelevant. smile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Stem cells: Now in amniotic fluid!

Media sound-bite takeaway: "This doesn't mean it's not imperative that we keep killing embryos!"

Nonetheless, Daley said, the discovery shouldn't be used as a replacement for human embryonic stem cell research.

"While they are fascinating subjects of study in their own right, they are not a substitute for human embryonic stem cells, which allow scientists to address a host of other interesting questions in early human development," said Daley, who began work last year to clone human embryos to produce stem cells.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

Simple switch turns cells embryonic: Technique removes need for eggs or embryos (Nature)

Research reported this week by three different groups shows that normal skin cells can be reprogrammed to an embryonic state in mice. The race is now on to apply the surprisingly straightforward procedure to human cells.

If researchers succeed, it will make it relatively easy to produce cells that seem indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells, and that are genetically matched to individual patients. There are limits to how useful and safe these would be for therapeutic use in the near term, but they should quickly prove a boon in the lab.

Edited by popechild

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Simple switch turns cells embryonic: Technique removes need for eggs or embryos (Nature)

Research reported this week by three different groups shows that normal skin cells can be reprogrammed to an embryonic state in mice. The race is now on to apply the surprisingly straightforward procedure to human cells.

If researchers succeed, it will make it relatively easy to produce cells that seem indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells, and that are genetically matched to individual patients. There are limits to how useful and safe these would be for therapeutic use in the near term, but they should quickly prove a boon in the lab.

Wow.

GREAT news. Thanks for sharing this, popechild!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Wesley Smith:

So thank you for your courageous leadership, Mr. President. Because of your willingness to absorb the brickbats of the Science Establishment, the Media Elite, and weak-kneed Republican and Democratic politicians alike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

What an article! Whew!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Once again: Media sound-bite takeaway: "This doesn't mean it's not imperative that we keep killing embryos!"

At least for the time being, says Dr. Douglas Melton, co-director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, embryonic stem cell research should continue, since it's not clear yet how robust and safe stem cell therapies from other methods might be. "My answer to that question comes from a different perspective," he says. "Not from a scientific or political one, but from a patient perspective. A patient doesn't care how we got there. They're suffering from a disease and want to get the therapies as fast as they can. Until this method produces cells that have fully normal behavior, and normal physiological behavior, we cannot eliminate any avenue of research."

And again:

Other scientists said it's too early for the field to follow Wilmut's lead. Cloning embryos to produce stem cells remains too valuable as a research tool, Jaenisch said.

Dr. George Daley of the Harvard institute, who said his own lab has also achieved direct reprogramming of human cells, said it's not clear how long it will take to get around the cancer risk problem. Nor is it clear just how direct reprogramming works, or whether that approach mimics what happens in cloning, he noted.

So the cloning approach still has much to offer, he said.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Simple switch turns cells embryonic: Technique removes need for eggs or embryos (Nature)

Research reported this week by three different groups shows that normal skin cells can be reprogrammed to an embryonic state in mice. The race is now on to apply the surprisingly straightforward procedure to human cells.

If researchers succeed, it will make it relatively easy to produce cells that seem indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells, and that are genetically matched to individual patients. There are limits to how useful and safe these would be for therapeutic use in the near term, but they should quickly prove a boon in the lab.

Wow.

GREAT news. Thanks for sharing this, popechild!

Semi-related followup:

I had lunch last Sunday with a scientist who's leading a team of researchers at the University of Alabama-Birmingham (UAB) in an effort to translate some of the recent stem cell advances into practical applications, specifically targeting Sickle Cell Anemia. It was incredibly exciting to hear about some of the advances they've been making, but it's always hard to know as a non-scientist what it all means in the "real world." Lo and behold, today I go looking for any news on a paper he had said to be on the lookout for, and I find this:

Researchers Say New Stem Cell Technique Cures Sickle Cell in Mice (Newswise)

Researchers at UAB (University of Alabama at Birmingham), along with a team from the Whitehead Institute, report successfully treating sickle cell anemia in mouse models using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, a new stem cell technique that uses skin cells and does not require embryos. The findings, published in Science Express Online on Dec. 6, are the first to actually use the iPS technique to treat disease in an animal model.

The iPS technique received widespread attention in November when two laboratories reported using the process to turn human skin cells into stem cells, cells which can then be induced to form any other type of cell. Scientists believe stem cells have great potential in treating a variety of human diseases.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I wish stories like this one weren't banner-headlined at the Drudge Report, because frankly, I'd rather not know about this stuff. But we all know this has been coming.

Interesting rationale, don'cha think?

A team has grown hybrid embryos after injecting human DNA into eggs taken from cows' ovaries, which had most of their genetic material removed.

The embryos survived for three days and are intended to provide a limitless supply of stem cells to develop therapies for diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and spinal cord injuries, overcoming a worldwide shortfall in human embryos.

Dr Teija Peura, director of human embryonic stem cell laboratories at the Australian Stem Cell Centre, said somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) had been done between animal species, but the "99 per cent human" embryos could boost research.

"If successful, they would provide an important additional research tool to help realisation of stem cell-based therapies for human diseases," Dr Peura said.

Sleep easy tonight, folks. Sleep easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Oh, God, God, God - forgive us. Or judge us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0