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'Wildly Successful' Bible for Girls

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Christian wrote:

: Does this mean the upcoming Bible for guys will look like Maxim?

Actually, the first thing I thought, on seeing the subject header for this thread, was "Girls Gone Wild: The Bible!"

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Actually, the first thing I thought, on seeing the subject header for this thread, was \"Girls Gone Wild: The Bible!\"

That'd have to be the Old Testament & apocrypha. Judith! Jael! Rahab! Jezebel! Abishag the Shuhite! Tamar!

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Among its declarations: \"Revolve girls don't call guys.\" ... Whaley said, \"we've had a lot of questions\" about the don't-call-boys advice. \"I don't know if you'll see it in the second edition.\"

This reminds me of a youth group lesson on why wait? We had to look up Scripture verses on a variety of topics, and the verse for the topic "girls calling guys" was Proverbs 11:22:

"Like a gold ring in a pig's snout

is a beautiful woman who shows no discretion."

That one killed me.

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Argh. I don't know whether to be pleased at the possibility that girls will read the New Testament, skeptical that it will be parents who buy it for girls who won't read it (as with previous trendy teen versions), or just cranky.

As the "argh" indicates, I'm leaning toward cranky, but I should probably pray for a more charitable stance.

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\"Like a gold ring in a pig's snout  

is a beautiful woman who shows no discretion.\"

That one killed me.

I got a heavy dose of "girls should never call guys" while I was in Campus Crusade, but if my wife, Sarah, hadn't called me back after our disastrous second date, I'm 99% sure we wouldn't have had any relationship beyond those two nights out. I was prepared to be sad for a while before retreating back to singlehood. That was my m.o. about 5 years ago.

Her call changed everything, thank God.

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Christian wrote:

: Her call changed everything, thank God.

I can't say any one of D's calls to me have had that sort of effect, but I do know that the fact that SHE called ME sometimes in the early stages of our relationship, and that it wasn't just ME calling HER, helped.

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For those who might be interested, the next Sunday New York Times Magazine is going to have an interview with the woman behind "Revolve."

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My wife asked me out on our first date. And my girlfriend before that asked me out on our first date. And my girlfriend before that asked me out on our first date. And my girlfriend before that asked me out on our first date. And, um, that'd be all the girlfriends.

Dale

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Alright, I mounted a personal PR campaign (more crafty, but less expensive and pervasive than Finch's in American Pie) to get Dena to perceive me as a competitive suitor. It included precisely timed requests for dates as well as dates not being an issue at all at points. I never proposed to her. It would not have worked. I worked hard on a context for her to broach the idea.

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Does this mean the upcoming Bible for guys will look like Maxim?

"The ILLEST translation yet! D'oh, wrong derivative mag reference. :oops:

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Very informative indeed. I suppose this "Biblezine" can do some good, but ultimately, I think I agree with the author's conclusion:

It's not a magazine. It's not a Bible. It's not even a study Bible, Whaley told me. It's "an inspirational and motivational Bible product."

The Word of God is not the only thing this product is selling.

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Yes, it was most illuminating that all of the 'Top 10 Great Christian Books' listed in a Revolve sidebar were Thomas Nelson products.

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Yes, it was most illuminating that all of the 'Top 10 Great Christian Books' listed in a Revolve sidebar were Thomas Nelson products.

Ironically, this is sleazy even by secular standards. I long ago lost expectation of "higher" standards for "christian" businesses. I never understood why the anecdotal evidence I had compiled of bad practice seemed so much worse than elsewhere. Now, I think that it is the discipline of market forces. In a free market there is no a priori reason to compell use of anyone's service instead of someone elses. OTOH, when you create a protected niche on artificially moral grounds you can appeal to the moral imperative of niche participation and can disguise the substandard service, or explain it away with some justification having nothing to do with the transaction or its economic rationale.

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To me, this is just as troubling because it signifies the progressive dumbing-down of the American populace: heaven forbid a teen would actually read something that doesn't have photos or advertising fluff in the margins! As Mark Twain said, "The man who does not read books has no advantage over the man that can not read them."

Also, I'm increasingly troubled with the whole Study Bible phenomenon, and how the study notes seem to receive equal or greater attention than the actual Word of God. In 'Revolve,' this appears to play out in its anti-egalitarian stance towards relations between the sexes (and who knows what else - probably some good ol' American-style ethnocentrism).

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Great quote from Mark Twain Andrew. I hadn't heard that before.

I too am troubled by the study bible phenomenon as well. As a teacher of a regular Sunday School class, I find that at least once a day, someone has got to quote me an extended passage from their study bible. And while I'm all for using sources, reading, and developing our understanding of God's word, I sometimes begin to wonder if people aren't putting those notes on the same level as the Scripture itself.

I know that when we taught High Schoolers, they did this - especially when we differed from their SB's. If their study Bible says it, then it must be right. It seems that the book begins to take the place of the pastor/teacher on one side, and it takes the place of any independent thinking on their part.

I don't know though. I'm conflicted because I like that people are reading about the interpretation of the Bible and how to read it properly. It just seems it takes an unhealthy role sometimes.

And as for the direct topic of this thread, the girl's teen magazine, er Bible, I am just not sure the right direction is to try and find shallow reasons (cool covers and quizzes) for them to pick it up. If they don't realize the importance of the Bible in their lives, I don't know that snazzy covers are going to help all that much (especially knowing that the people making the snazzy covers are ultimately interested in sales over what becomes of those sold 'Bibles.' I think the responsibility falls on both the teens and the adults in their lives who are not teaching them properly its importance.

I also don't know that I'm ready to go to any length just to make sure someone picks up a Bible. There's a certain level of seperateness there. I'd like to keep it distinct somehow, because it is distinct. There is no other book like it. It is God's special revelation of Himself. Yet when some are so busy making sure it looks just like everything else, it seems to take away some of what is special about it.

Ah well, this is much longer than originally intended :oops:

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Perhaps longer, but worthwhile, IMO -- some good thoughts in there, John, with which I agree completely.

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John, unless kids are completely different today, or the church has stumbled in its mission to teach scripture, I think there is not too much to worry about. When I was in college, we quoted study notes, but only as a guide to "solving" the passage. Heck, I remember getting into arguments over the legitimacy of various translations (in seeking to undermine "troubling" notes), but never questioning the legitimacy of the passage itself. Further, weren't Scofield's notes a hot ticket to understanding the Bible at one time?

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Rich Kennedy wrote:

: Further, weren't Scofield's notes a hot ticket to understanding the Bible at

: one time?

The guy who helped make rapture theology mainstream dogma? This is supposed to help us NOT worry? wink.gif

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A couple more thoughts on these subjects:

1) Picking up on John's comment about the specialness of the Bible, as God's uniquely inspired revelation to mankind - what message is it sending when this unique and in many ways timeless Book is packaged in the manner of one of the most ephemeral print media, the magazine? Tying it in with dating tips, Old Testament beauty secrets, whatever, only furthers the appearance of trivialization.

2) Re: study Bibles, I'm less concerned about what Rich is describing, i.e. the use of notes to aid in understanding. Heck, I've got 2 study Bibles that I regularly use in this fashion.

Rather, I'm troubled by those who use the comments at the bottom of the page to short-circuit learning and reflection. I recall one small group I was a part of: whenever we came upon a challenging Scripture passage, one group member would soon be reading out her Life Application note, and the group reaction was as if the conundrum were instantaneously resolved.

It's the old contention, that too often Christians are taught what to think, not how to think.

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2) Re: study Bibles, I'm less concerned about what Rich is describing, i.e. the use of notes to aid in understanding. Heck, I've got 2 study Bibles that I regularly use in this fashion.

Rather, I'm troubled by those who use the comments at the bottom of the page to short-circuit learning and reflection. I recall one small group I was a part of: whenever we came upon a challenging Scripture passage, one group member would soon be reading out her Life Application note, and the group reaction was as if the conundrum were instantaneously resolved.

It's the old contention, that too often Christians are taught what to think, not how to think.

What he said. smile.gif Especially that last line. I want my students to reflect and think, and to grow in their abilities to do those things. So I want them to grapple with the issues before running right to the 'answer.'

That said, I think study Bibles and commentaries are great tools (my first post might have come off a bit too hard on them). They provide a dialogue partner of sorts that helps to spur the mind on. In fact, I have a few that I use regularly to help further my thinking, but only after I've wrestled with the passage myself for a bit.

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