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Sara

What is your favorite Hitchcock scene?

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Sara   

Without giving away any endings so as to spoil the movie for others, what is your favorite Hitchcock scene?

One of mine is the tennis match in "Strangers on a Train" where all the people watching the match are moving their heads with the ball, left then right, left then right - all but ONE person - Robert Walker who is looking straight at Farley Granger with a pleased look on his face, and I believe is eating popcorn. (Not sure it is popcorn, but I believe he is chewing...)

Sara

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stu   
Vertigo, the tree-trunk cross section scene: "Somewhere here I was born, and there I die. It was only a moment for you, you didn't even notice..." I like the look of Kim Novak's gloves against the wood.

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MattPage   

I'm not sure if you can really class this as a scene per se because technicially all of the film is one scene, in fact you can't even classify it as favourite shot as it's part of one that goes on for 8 minutes, but nevertheless, one of my favourites would be the bit in Rope where we see him drop the rope into the draw on the other side of the swing door.

I also love the cleaning lasdy scene in Marnie, the murder scene in Torn Curtain, the second vertigo scene in , um, Vertigo, and probably lots more I can't think of.

Matt

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The crop-dusting scene in North by Northwest

The wine cellar scene in Notorious.

The scream turning into a train whistle in The Thirty Nine Steps.

Farley Granger thinking he's talking to Bruno's father in Strangers On A Train when it's Bruno all along.

The name appearing in the steam on the window in The Lady Vanishes.

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finnegan   

I have to agree with rathmadder and say the crop-dusting scene in NxNW--simply for the fact that there is no dialoge at all and you never even see what the pilot looks like. When I was watching Spielberg's Duel I realized he was essentially making an entire movie out of that one Hitchcock scene.

A close second is the long camera shot in Frenzy where the Rusk goes inside his apartment with that girl and the camera follows him, then they shut the door and the camera slinks back down the stairs into the street with all the street noise.

Vertigo, the tree-trunk cross section scene: "Somewhere here I was born, and there I die. It was only a moment for you, you didn't even notice..." I like the look of Kim Novak's gloves against the wood.

I love the fact that that scene ended up in 12 Monkeys when they're hiding out in the theatre.

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Sara   

I, too, love the scene rathmadder liked where Miss Foy's name disappeared in the train window after they went into a tunnel and came out. (Strangers on a Train)

Also, I was intrigued that Hitchcock's daughter, Pat, was in this movie, in which she looks similar to the hated wife of Farley Grainger.

Another great memory for me is Montgomery Clift's face throughout "I Confess."

This movie was powerful and thought provoking, don't you think?

Sara

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Mark   

An obvious choice, maybe, but the shower scene in Psycho is still a marvel to watch.

One that sticks with me (and which I went on and on about in the Favorite Hitchcock thread) is from Rope, where the camera stays on a chest that contains the corpse, as a housekeeper clears the top of the chest and prepares to return some empty dinner plates. Hitch builds a great sense of suspense by letting us see what the housekeeper's doing even as the killers are clueless.

From Vertigo, the whole "following" scene where Jimmy Stewart watches Kim Novak in a musuem and throughout San Francisco is so well done (and ripped off by Brian DePalma in Dressed to Kill).

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Sara   

From Vertigo, the whole "following" scene where Jimmy Stewart watches Kim Novak in a musuem and throughout San Francisco is so well done (and ripped off by Brian DePalma in Dressed to Kill).

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stu   
Vertigo, the tree-trunk cross section scene: "Somewhere here I was born, and there I die. It was only a moment for you, you didn't even notice..." I like the look of Kim Novak's gloves against the wood.

I love the fact that that scene ended up in 12 Monkeys when they're hiding out in the theatre.

Yeah, I think that's probably the reason I've picked up on it, as I really like 12 monkeys. And doesn't Bruce Willis think he's seen it before, or something, which is clever given that the whole scene is about in what context Madeline has seen the woods before (i.e. as herself, or as... er, um, that old dead woman).

Another great bit in Vertigo is that church yard section of the Steward-follows-Novak sequence; some of the camera angles are very strange, at one point the camera is at Stewart's feet, making him look like some kind of elongated freak.

I love Vertigo. I should go and watch it right now, instead of reading stupid Derrida books.

Edited by stu

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M. Leary   

The murder scene in Frenzy that is shot entirely by simply having the camera move backward away from the closed door, around and down the staircase, and then out into the street where the noise of cars and commerce and pedestrians drown out the terror of what is happening above. 

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Brian D   

I recall a sequence more than a scene: right around the climactic moment the train was stopped in the midst of wartime chaos in Lady Vanishes, I was coming to the conclusion that there isn't a more fun Hitchcock than this film.

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Many scenes in NOTORIOUS, but if I have to pick one, it's the scene where Devlin returns from his bosses to tell Alicia what her assignment will be. All the feelings they have for each other are now suppressed. All their real thoughts are unspoken and contradictory to the what is said aloud, but yet we know exactly what is in their minds. It's a terrific scene of writing, acting, and directing.

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