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Peter T Chattaway

300 (2006)

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We have to remember that all violence is God's violence. Therefore, when the psalmist speaks of dashing infant's heads upon the rocks, we are not dealing with a bronze age barbarian who doesn't know God yet. We are dealing with someone to whom God said "my enemies dying is a good thing." Violence is inherent to justice. It is part of creation as we know it. Fallen creation, yes, which means that we have innate knowledge of an order in which violence does not exist, and we yearn for it. Yet we also know that war, like divorce, exists because hearts are hard toward God. The great burden is to understand how to prosecute things like war and divorce in a way which protects the weak and helpless and keeps the truly hardened at bay. Thus, we know of the great warrior at the end of time who wreaks havoc upon his enemies in spectacular fashion in order to protect the weak and helpless.

In the meanwhile, of course, knowing that we are reconciled when we deserved to be destroyed, we have a new kingdom in which we sense God destroying his enemies not by killing them, but by converting them. So we work in this paradigm. Yet we seek, with varying levels of success, to apply these truths in realms like the magistrate, where they seem awfully hard to apply sometimes. The great tragedy of human life is that we, as a race, resist mercy, and have to be restrained by our fellow sinners from harming one another.

Excellent thoughts. I've been turning this over in my head lately, but in the context of Sin City. Coincidence?

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Theoddone33, I'll start a new topic in response under the politics section. Here.

Edited by Mairn

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Variety reports that a sequel... prequel... whatever... is in the works.

Legendary Pictures has confirmed it is developing a "300" follow-up for Warner Bros. that Frank Miller is writing and Zack Snyder is intended to direct.

Miller is writing the graphic novel the project will be based upon, although at this point it's not clear whether it will be a prequel or spinoff. Most of the characters, including Gerard Butler's King Leonidas, died in the original, making a follow-up tricky.

Snyder won't officially commit until after he sees Miller's take, but he's definitely interested, and the prospect of his involvement already has fanboys in a tizzy.

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300 Sequel/Prequel Storyline Revealed!

Snyder says he's spoken with Frank Miller who will be writing and drawing the graphic novel that the second film will be based on. Upon Miller's completion of the book, then, and only then, will they delve into writing a script for the movie. . . .

Snyder also said it will take place between the Battle of Thermopylae and the Battle of Plataea, the battle that narrator Dilios is at while re-telling the story of King Leonidas and the mighty Spartans to a new group of warriors at the end of 300.

IESB.net, October 1

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Seeing as how David Wenham's character is more or less the only one who could conceivably appear in this (barring supernatural plot elements that would bring back Leonidas and co.), the question is...can Wenham carry one of these actors-and-blue-screen comic book action flicks all by his lonesome? The prospect seems a tad underwhelming to me (though I loved him as Faramir in Lord of the Rings).

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Is there a working title yet?

If it's a prequel, I vote for 299. If it's a sequel ... you figure it out.

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Well, the Persians apparently had an army of 300,000 at the Battle of Plataea... so I'm thinkin' 300,000 could work as a title.

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Jeff wrote:

: . . . can Wenham carry one of these actors-and-blue-screen comic book action flicks all by his lonesome?

FWIW, I don't think he has to. He could still be a supporting charaacter. He would just be supporting someone ELSE.

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I revisit the film for my 10 Years Later series. 

Quote

There are great films that depict the horrors of war and honor those who sacrifice themselves as part of it. Saving Private Ryan and Fury come to mind. There are many as well about civilians who sacrifice money, career, and even lives to promote the progress of a cause or idea greater than themselves. Sacrifice is a noble thing. Of the one who sacrifices his life, the Bible says there is no greater love. It may well be that the Spartans at Thermopylae knew what they were fighting for and found the battle a perfect vehicle to express the values around which they ordered their lives. This review is a critique of their movie, not of them.



 

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This thing is on Netflix, which means I've finally gotten around to seeing it.  Ken's spot on with his 10 years review.  I'm surprised that the film with all its stylization was as inert as it was.  I also expected more gore, so I noticed that when the blood was flowing, the sand stayed unstained.  This led to an almost clinical feeling--that there's no weight to this thing, even as it purports to showcase Spartan valor in the face of unstoppable invasion.  The politics of this are a mess, I suppose, although it may have no politics to begin with.  The end coda, with Dilius leading the charge lend only the tiniest gram of weight to the sacrifice of Leonidas, which could have been supplied with a much stronger dramatic arc.  What if Gorgo was actually marshalling the army to come to their aid?  What if she was evacuating the city and only needed three days' time?  But nope--pretty much, what would it have looked like if we turned 300 the comic book into 300 the movie?  And that's about it.

One final shot--why the incessant narration?  So annoying.  My wife asked if I had the voiceover for visually impaired feature on.

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On 3/19/2018 at 12:28 PM, Buckeye Jones said:

This thing is on Netflix, which means I've finally gotten around to seeing it.  Ken's spot on with his 10 years review. 

 

Thank you for saying that. Made me smile.

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